August 5, 2013 | by

PulsePoint app tells users someone nearby needs CPR

Fox31DenverARVADA, Colo. — The Arvada Fire Department is teaming up with a smart phone app developer in an effort to mix altruism with geo-location technology to save lives.
PulsePoint is a free app that can help someone who is having sudden cardiac arrest.

Users register through the app that they know CPR. The app will then notify the user if someone nearby is having cardiac arrest. It gives directions to the victim as well as show any nearby defibrillators.

The app is activated by 911 dispatchers and alerts go to anyone within walking distance of the victim, that is CPR trained and is willing to help.

The notifications are also only made if the victim is in a public place such as a mall or park, said Arvada fire spokesman Scott Pribble.

Read the full story by Thomas Hendrick at FOX31 Denver (KDVR).

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August 5, 2013 | by

New Arvada Fire Channel app launched by Arvada Fire could save a life

ARVADA – Arvada Fire launched the PulsePoint application on the Arvada Fire Channel, which could potentially help save lives.

Click here if video not displaying properly.

The free application notifies registered users of a cardiac arrest that has occurred in a public place nearby. PulsePoint puts out a map giving directions to the person, the location of the AEDs in the area, and in the future, it will also provide the radio traffic of the emergency responders.

To sign up for this application, a person has to be willing to do “hands-only” CPR, and the Good Samaritan Law covers anyone who is willing to help.

For iPhone users, PulsePoint can be searched and directly downloaded from the App Store. Android users can find the app under the same name on Google Play.

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August 5, 2013 | by

Turn Your Smart Phone into a Life Saver

Arvada FPD LogoARVADA – Your smart phone can do so many things from keeping your life on schedule, to checking your social media status and even playing games. Now your phone can help you save a life.

On Monday, August 5th, Arvada Fire will launch the Arvada Fire channel on the smart phone application, PulsePoint. The free PulsePoint app, which is available in your phone’s app store, will notify registered users of a cardiac arrest that has occurred in a public place that is in their vicinity. The app will give the citizen responder mapping directions, it will notify them of any automatic external defibrillators (AEDs) that are in the area and will, in the near future, even provide the radio traffic of the emergency responders.
When a person goes into sudden cardiac arrest, their heart, lungs and brain no longer receive the oxygen that they need to survive. For every minute that they do not receive chest compressions, their chance of survival decreases by 10%. Quick math would tell you that they would have zero chance of survival after just 10 minutes. That is why it is so important to get this process started before emergency responders arrive on the scene.

So, you want to help but mouth-to-mouth grosses you out? No problem. To sign up for this app, you only need to be willing to do “Hands-Only” CPR. According to the American Heart Association, Hands-Only CPR has been shown to be as effective as conventional CPR in the first few minutes of an out-of-hospital sudden cardiac arrest. Have you been trained in CPR but your card has expired? No problem. You do not need to be CPR certified to participate in this program. The Good Samaritan Law covers anyone who is willing to help as long as they do not attempt to do more than they are trained to do.

We are available to do interviews for the morning shows if you are interested. Shots could include an interview about how the app works and a brief lesson on “Hands-Only” CPR.

ABOUT PULSEPOINT
PulsePoint is a 501(c)(3) non-profit foundation based in the San Francisco Bay Area. Their mission is to make it much easier for citizens who are trained in CPR to use their life saving skills to do just that…save lives! Through the use of modern, location-aware mobile devices PulsePoint is building applications that work with local public safety agencies to improve communications with citizens and empower them to help reduce the millions of annual deaths from sudden cardiac arrest.

See more at: www.pulsepoint.org

Contact
Scott Pribble, Public Information Officer
Deanna Harrington, Public Information Officer
303-425-9203

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May 29, 2013 | by

Columbus Division of Fire Uncovers the PulsePoint of Community Heroism

Division of Fire adds Smartphone App that Dispatches and 
Transforms CPR Trained Citizens into First Responders

COC-Logo300pxCOLUMBUS, Ohio – Red light. It was a beautiful sunny afternoon, and Kylie Salvadore waited for the traffic signal to change. Green light. The vehicles ahead of her don’t move. Yellow light. Horns blow and the cars ahead her begin to maneuver around the trucks stopped ahead.

“I noticed a man from the second vehicle walk up to the driver’s side window and reach in,” said Salvadore, a recent Columbus Division of Fire paramedic graduate. “I pulled up and asked if the man needed help. He told me yes.”

“There was something wrong with his friend. I knew I could help,” she continued.

In an instant, Salvadore became the first responder. Fortunately, she was a trained paramedic and cardiac pulmonary resuscitation (CPR) instructor.

She began administering CPR until the paramedics arrived on the scene and took over the care. Her quick actions saved his life. Currently, the driver is recovering in the hospital.

How can the average citizen have access to trained CPR personnel within seconds or minutes of a sudden cardiac event? Well, thanks to smartphone technology, anyone certified in CPR can be a potential lifesaving first-responder.

PulsePoint is an app that notifies citizens trained in CPR of a nearby emergency that requires their expertise. Those within a half-mile radius, who have downloaded the app will receive a text message informing them of the incident. A notice appears with the location or address if in a public place. If the event occurs at a private residence, only the street name is displayed.

The app works in conjunction with 911 technologies. This is done in a continued effort to minimize the time between the sudden cardiac arrest events and the start of CPR. The hope is to increase survival rates.

The City of Columbus Division of Fire added the app to its repertoire of services. On May 20, 2013, the app became available to division members.

“We want to encourage all citizens trained in CPR to download the app,” said City of Columbus Division of Fire Chief Gregory A. Paxton. “So, we decided to start in-house first.”
To date, 392 firefighters have downloaded the smartphone app.

“Our ultimate goal is to decrease the amount of time between the initial incident and CPR implementation,” Paxton continued. “It allows trained citizens to bridge the gap until paramedics arrive. Survival of cardiac arrest is all about timing.”

To install the PulsePoint app simply search PulsePoint in the Apple App Store or in Android Apps on Google Play.

Contact
B/C Patrick Ferguson
Public Information Officer
(614) 645-7859

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April 23, 2013 | by

APCO Launches Application Community (“AppComm”) Website

AppCommAlexandria, VA – Today the Association of Public-Safety Communications Officials (APCO) International launched the Application Community – “AppComm” – a new website dedicated to public safety and emergency response apps for use by the general public, app developers, and first responders.

AppComm is the single, trusted online forum where public safety professionals, the general public, and app developers can rate and comment on apps, submit ideas for new apps to serve public safety needs, and suggest additional apps for inclusion on the site. The site provides clickable links to download the apps from external developer websites and app stores.

As the world’s largest organization of public safety communications professionals, APCO is lending its considerable collective expertise and reputation to create AppComm because it recognizes the importance of providing a platform that the public safety community can trust and rely upon to aggregate and develop the most effective apps for public safety and emergency response.

Read the full press release by APCO International in Public Safety Communications.

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March 6, 2013 | by

PulsePoint Foundation President, Richard Price, Named JEMS EMS Innovator for 2012

EMS10Header600pxWashington, D.C. – At the EMS Today Conference tonight, March 6, 2013 PulsePoint Foundation President Richard Price, along with other progressive professionals who have driven the practice of EMS forward in 2012, were celebrated at the Innovators in EMS Dinner and Award Ceremony. The EMS 10: Innovators in EMS Award, sponsored by the Journal of Emergency Medical Services (JEMS) and Physio-Control Inc., “recognizes ten individuals who are models of quality service and have taken great risks in an effort to advance the art and science of prehospital emergency care. Their efforts serve as an inspiration and a challenge to the rest of the EMS community.”

Chief Price was recognized for his vision to empower citizen responders with the lifesaving PulsePoint mobile app. The app aims to improve the frequency of bystander CPR by increasing awareness of cardiac events beyond the traditional “witnessed” area and by increasing the awareness and speed of public access defibrillator (AED) deployment by providing precise location information of nearby devices in real-time and in context with the rescuers current location.

The EMS Today Conference and Expo is being held at the Walter E. Washington Convention Center in Washington D.C. from March 5-9, 2013.

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February 9, 2013 | by

Contra Costa Fire Districts Launch Life-Saving Mobile App

CCC Fire Agency LogosA new cellphone app launched by fire departments throughout Contra Costa County this week is designed to give everyday citizens a chance to save lives.

The PulsePoint app notifies smartphone users who are trained in CPR and willing to respond to emergencies when someone nearby is suffering a cardiac emergency and may require CPR.

Watch PulsePoint’s video

With the help of the app, trained people in close proximity to a possible cardiac emergency can begin life-saving measures that may stabilize a heart attack victim while waiting for emergency responders to arrive, according to Contra Costa County Fire Protection District Fire Marshal Lewis Broschard.

Users of the app can check their phones to see the exact location of a reported cardiac emergency and how far arriving emergency responders are from that location at any given time.

“The deployment of the PulsePoint app is the next step in developing a comprehensive network of life-saving efforts that includes fire department first responders, ambulance transport providers, the placement of publicly accessible AEDs, hospital emergency departments and members of the public who are trained in CPR,” said Contra Costa County Fire Protection District Chief Daryl Louder.

Read the full article by Bay City News at Walnut Creek Patch.

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January 30, 2013 | by

Michigan CardioVascular Institute (MCVI) Foundation and Mobile Medical Response (MMR) Collaborate on New APProach to Saving Lives

Michigan CardioVascular Institute Foundation – Saginaw, Michigan(SAGINAW) – As part of the MCVI Foundation’s Shocks & Saves initiative, the Foundation and MMR have teamed up to release a life-saving smartphone app called PulsePoint at their upcoming Shocks & Saves Charity Hockey Game on Saturday, February 2, 4:30 p.m., at the Dow Event Center.

The free app, designed for both Android and iPhone, uses GPS to notify people with CPR training when an emergency cardiac event is happening near them.

Initially being piloted in Saginaw County, PulsePoint works in conjunction with MMR’s Medical Communications Center to create a community CPR/AED alert system

Here’s an example of how it works:

Someone at Best Buy collapses and isn’t breathing. A cashier calls 911. While an ambulance is dispatched to the scene, the message is simultaneously sent to PulsePoint. The app uses GPS to notify users within a quarter-mile of the scene.

A shopper at nearby Guitar Center is a PulsePoint user and receives a text alert that CPR is needed at Best Buy. The app includes a map showing the location of the victim and the nearest AED. The Guitar Center shopper can proceed to Best Buy, begin CPR, and deploy the automated external defibrillator (AED) before the ambulance arrives, significantly increasing the victim’s chances of survival.

The purpose of the app is to empower ordinary citizens, who are willing and trained, to become bystander rescuers.

“Sudden cardiac arrest is not the same as a heart attack,” says Diane Fong, MCVI Foundation executive director. Sudden cardiac arrest occurs when electrical impulses in the heart become rapid or chaotic, causing the heart to suddenly stop beating. Cardiac arrest can be reversed if CPR is performed or a defibrillator is used quickly to shock the heart back to a normal rhythm. “Minutes – even seconds – are precious,” Fong explains.

By providing CPR immediately after sudden cardiac arrest – while the ambulance is on the way – bystanders can double or triple a victim’s chance of survival of a teammate, nearby shopper, congregation member, fellow diner, spectator, neighbor, or loved one. “We know so many stories of ordinary people being in the right place at the right time to save a life. Obviously, the survivors are grateful. But the rescuers are truly moved by the opportunity to make a difference, pay it forward, and save a life.”

MCVI Foundation and MMR have teamed up for their annual Shocks & Saves Charity Hockey Game for six years now, explains Lynn Schutter, MMR director of community relations and strategic planning. “We’re extending the Shocks & Saves brand beyond hockey to include our year-round efforts to empower people to save lives. There are many people out there who are willing and able to perform CPR, and when available, use AEDs to improve survivability of sudden cardiac arrest victims.”

Part of the program includes free CPR training for chest-only compressions and AED use. Both MMR and MCVI Foundation offer several opportunities for free non-certified CPR training throughout the year. To kickoff the Shocks & Saves initiative, the first training blitz will be on Saturday, February 16, at Freeland Sports Zone at 9 a.m., 10:30 a.m. and 12 noon. Each class lasts just an hour.

Tickets to this year’s hockey game, which features local physicians, EMTs, and NHL celebrities, cost $12 and include admission into that evening’s Saginaw Spirit game. All proceeds will go to fund the PulsePoint phone app, to purchase and place AEDs throughout the region, to offer CPR training at schools, and to educate the public about heart disease.

For more information, visit www.shocksandsaves.org or to donate text the key word SHOCKS to 56512.

Contacts
Diane Fong
President/CEO, MCVI Foundation
(989) 754-3319 or (989) 293-2217

Lynn Schutter
Community Relations Director, MMR
(989) 907-2013 or (989) 798-2115

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January 29, 2013 | by

TVF&R First Fire Department in Oregon to Introduce Life-Saving Smartphone App

A free CPR smartphone app called PulsePoint is now available in Tualatin Valley Fire & Rescue’s (TVF&R) service area. The PulsePoint app enables subscribers who have indicated they are CPR trained* to be alerted to a cardiac arrest event simultaneously with TVF&R’s firefighters EMT/paramedics. The app uses sophisticated location-based services to alert citizens of the need for CPR in a public place, and directs them to the exact location of the nearest public access automated external defibrillator (AED). The free PulsePoint app can be found in the Apple App Store or in Android Apps on Google Play.

Tualatin Valley Fire & Rescue is the first fire department in Oregon to implement the PulsePoint app. Media are invited to attend a press conference in which Fire Chief Mike Duyck will officially launch the first CPR alert for a cardiac arrest. Watch our PulsePoint video at TVF&R’s YouTube site.

What: Press Conference to unveil Oregon’s first PulsePoint smartphone app
When: Tuesday, January 29th, at 1 pm
Where: TVF&R Fire Station 51 (8935 SW Burnham Street, Tigard 97223)
Activities: TVF&R’s YouTube video unveiled; Cardiac arrest survivor to speak on the importance of citizen response and CPR; App demonstration; Oregon’s first PulsePoint App activation

TVFR300pxIn addition to cardiac arrest incidents, the PulsePoint app also provides a virtual window into TVF&R’s emergency activity. Users can view active incidents and dispatched units, and pinpoint incident locations on an interactive map. Users also can choose to be notified of incidents by type and monitor emergency radio traffic via this modern version of the traditional fire scanner.

Businesses, schools, and other public sites with an AED are asked to visit TVF&R’s website to see if their AED is listed in TVF&R’s PulsePoint database. If not, email us at aed@tvfr.com to add your AED.

Fire Chief Mike Duyck states, “We are honored to bring this lifesaving tool to this region. TVF&R’s cardiac survival rates are some of the highest in the nation and this technology is another way in which we can—in partnership with our community—save even more lives.” Learn more about this powerful app at www.pulsepoint.org.

* “CPR trained” can be knowing how to administer Hands-Only CPR (no rescue breaths) or traditional CPR (with rescue breaths). Individuals can find information for both types of CPR on TVF&R’s website at www.tvfr.com

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January 20, 2013 | by

Kansas City Kansas Fire Department, University of Kansas Hospital to launch CPR program

KCKFD EMS UnitsKCKFD plans PulsePoint app deployment as integral part of HeartSafe Community strategy

Have you ever been in a situation where you’ve seen someone suddenly collapse and didn’t know what to do?

Remember, the difference between doing something and doing nothing could be the difference in saving someone’s life.

This is why the Kansas City, Kansas Fire Department is partnering with the University of Kansas Hospital to launch a new program that provides Hands- Only CPR training to citizens in Wyandotte County.

“Effective bystander CPR provided immediately after sudden cardiac arrest dramatically increases a victim’s chances of survival,” says KCK Fire Chief, John Paul Jones. “The HeartSafe Community mission is to empower our citizens to know what to do and the ability to act immediately. The life they save could be a member of the community, a loved one or a friend.”

Read the News Release at the Kansas City Kansan.

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