KRQE News 13

January 29, 2017 | by

Albuquerque paramedic recognized by Mayor for “off-the-clock” response

David ZamoraDavid Zamora was recognized for helping someone suffering a heart-attack while off the clock using the PulsePoint app. The app is linked to the dispatch system and lets people know if someone is in need of medical help in a public place near them.

Zamora said he and his wife had been shopping all day when he got the alert that someone needed CPR. He was honored for his effort, but Zamora said his wife is the real hero.

“This came right at the end where I promised her we would be home. She could see that it was nagging on me and she said, ‘Turn around, let’s go check.’”


vimeo.com/201614031

Source: KRQE News 13

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September 29, 2015 | by

Mobile App Helps Save Life of Santa Clara Cardiac Arrest Victim

Life-saving CPR performed after mobile app notifies nearby off-duty ER physician to emergency

SANTA CLARA, Calif., September 30, 2015 – On Sunday, May 24, 2015, 53-year old Santa Clara resident Kory Trebbin was attending church when, without warning, he suffered a sudden cardiac arrest (SCA) and was left unresponsive and without a pulse. Witnesses dialed 9-1-1 to alert authorities and while professional first responders were called to the scene, a nearby off-duty ER physician simultaneously received an alert via her smartphone notifying her of this emergency just blocks from her house. The alert was sent via PulsePoint, a 9-1-1 connected mobile app designed to alert CPR-trained citizens of SCA emergencies in their vicinity.

KTVU Newscast: PulsePoint app alerts nearby CPR-trained bystanders

The PulsePoint mobile app is designed to reduce collapse-to-CPR and collapse-to-defibrillation times by increasing CPR-trained citizen awareness of cardiac events beyond a traditional “witnessed” area. The app also directs users to the precise location of nearby public Automated External Defibrillators (AEDs).

The PulsePoint app directed the off-duty ER physician to the exact location of the emergency based on the 9-1-1 call information. Using this information, the physician made her way to the nearby church where Mr. Trebbin had collapsed and remained lifeless. The off-duty physician, who handles these medical emergencies everyday on the job, performed CPR until a Santa Clara Police Officer arrived equipped with an AED. The AED was used to deliver a shock before fire department paramedics arrived on the scene.

Because of the physicians’ advanced training she presented her credentials to the arriving paramedics and assumed patient responsibility onsite. The physician, alongside paramedics, delivered three additional shocks to Mr. Trebbin before his heart established a productive rhythm. The team then transported him to the closest hospital, which happened to be where the off-duty physician was a practicing emergency room doctor. She was able to alert the attending doctor to Mr. Trebbin’s condition from the ambulance, seamlessly transferring his care.

Mr. Trebbin was without a heart beat for a reported 18 minutes, but walked out of the hospital, healthy and without cognitive impairment, just four days later.

“It’s a miracle I’m alive,” said Kory Trebbin. “I’m so thankful to those who called 9-1-1 and to the professional first responders who rushed to the scene. But the reason I’m alive today is because PulsePoint connected me to someone who could, and did, save my life.”

Santa Clara County was one of the first counties in the nation to fully integrate this technology with its 9-1-1 system. The collaboration and allocated resources from the Santa Clara County fire departments, the PulsePoint Foundation, El Camino Hospital and the tech company Workday brought this lifesaving technology to Santa Clara County citizens. The coordinated effort by the Santa Clara Fire Department, the Santa Clara Police Department, the PulsePoint-notified citizen responder and the care provided by the emergency room combined to save Mr. Trebbin’s life.

About the PulsePoint Foundation
PulsePoint is a 501(c)(3) non-profit foundation based in the San Francisco Bay Area. Through the use of location-aware mobile devices PulsePoint is building applications that work with local public safety agencies to improve communications with citizens, empowering them to help reduce the millions of annual deaths from sudden cardiac arrest (SCA). Deployment of the PulsePoint app can significantly strengthen the “chain of survival” by improving bystander response to cardiac arrest victims and increasing the chance that lifesaving steps will be taken prior to the arrival of emergency medical services (EMS). PulsePoint is supported by the Wireless Foundation, built and maintained by volunteer engineers at Workday and distributed by our marketing and implementation partner Physio-Control, Inc. Learn more at www.pulsepoint.org or join the conversation at Facebook and Twitter. The free app is available for download on iTunes and Google Play.

About Cardiac Arrest
Out-of-hospital cardiac arrest is a leading cause of death in the United States, accounting for an estimated 424,000 deaths each year, more than 1,000 deaths per day. The American Heart Association estimates that effective bystander CPR, provided immediately after cardiac arrest, can double or triple a person’s chance of survival. However, less than half of cardiac arrest victims receive bystander CPR and even fewer receive a potentially lifesaving therapeutic shock from a public access AED. Improving bystander CPR rates and access to AEDs is critical to the chain of survival, which requires: (1) early recognition of the emergency and phoning 911 for EMS, (2) early bystander CPR, (3) early delivery of a shock via a defibrillator if indicated and (4) early advanced life support and post-resuscitation care delivered by healthcare providers. Different than a heart attack, sudden cardiac arrest is caused when the heart’s electrical system malfunctions and the heart stops working properly. For every minute that passes without a SCA victim receiving resuscitation, the chances of that person surviving decrease 10 percent. After 10 minutes the chances of survival are minimal.

About Santa Clara
Santa Clara is a family-oriented and business-friendly city, led by a city government that has developed an award-winning ethics program and a commitment to fostering public trust. Located in Santa Clara County at the southern end of San Francisco Bay, about 45 miles south of San Francisco, Santa Clara is a strategic regional hub, convenient to freeways, airports, railroads, expressways, light rail and other public transportation. Home to global companies such as Intel and Citrix, world-class educational institutions like Santa Clara University, and the San Francisco 49ers who play at Levi’s Stadium. The City of Santa Clara offers history, innovation, culture, sports and fun and represents The Center of What’s Possible.

Media contact:
Shannon Smith
ssmith@smithmediarelations.com
O: (616) 724-4256
C: (773) 339-7513

###

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September 3, 2015 | by

Off-Duty Firefighter and Neighbor Rescue Resident From House Fire

Two residents of a home located at 18111 SW Kramien Road in Wilsonville were awoken by a quickly moving fire at approximately 6:05 a.m. today.

One resident was able to escape safely. A second resident was still inside the house.

As neighbors called 911, an off-duty TVF&R firefighter who lived nearby, was alerted to the fire via the PulsePoint app on his smartphone. TVF&R Firefighter Chris Mills and neighbor Jesse Keller pulled one adult woman to safety to on-scene medical crews.

Crews en route to the scene saw a large column of black smoke prompting escalation of the incident to a second-alarm response. This brought additional resources, including water tenders to shuttle water to the scene for firefighting.

On arrival, crews found a single-story house fully involved in fire. Crews began fighting the fire while additional crews tended to the rescued patient. Firefighters searched the home and confirmed no additional occupants were inside.

One patient sustained life-threatening injuries as a result of the fire and was transported by Life Flight helicopter to a local hospital. One patient was assessed on scene and taken to a local hospital for evaluation as a precaution. A number of animals were found on-scene, including four dogs, one cat, one parakeet, and a number of ducks and geese. Two dogs perished as a result of the fire.

Approximately 70 firefighters responded to the incident, including crews from Newberg Fire Department and Dundee Fire Department.

TVF&R investigators are on-scene and continue to interview witnesses and evaluate material evidence to determine the cause of the fire. No damage estimate is available at this time.

TVF&R would like to remind everyone that working smoke alarms can save lives. Combined with a family escape plan and central meeting place, families can better prepare themselves in the event of a fire emergency in your home.

Source: Tualatin Valley Fire & Rescue

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April 13, 2015 | by

PulsePoint App Helps Save Life of Cardiac Arrest Victim

Media contacts:

Shannon Smith, PulsePoint Foundation
ssmith@smithmediarelations.com
O: (616) 724-4256
C: (773) 339-7513

Chris Ernst, El Camino Hospital
Chris_Ernst@elcaminohospital.org
O: (650) 962-5853
C: (415) 710-9445

Life-saving CPR performed after mobile app funded by El Camino Hospital
notifies nearby citizen responder

SUNNYVALE, Calif., April 13, 2015 – On Wednesday, March 25, 2015 lifelong Sunnyvale resident Walter Huber was sitting down to dinner when he received an alert through PulsePoint, a 9-1-1 connected mobile app designed to alert CPR-trained citizens of sudden cardiac arrest (SCA) emergencies in their vicinity. This app alert helped save a man’s life.

The PulsePoint app displayed a map showing Huber, 21, the location of the emergency, which was based on 9-1-1 call information. Using this map Huber made his way to the reported SCA patient’s location—a soccer field just steps from his home—where he found a man unconscious and surrounded by his teammates. Just minutes earlier the man had collapsed, unresponsive and without a pulse, prompting his teammates to call 9-1-1. Huber, who is CPR trained, immediately assessed the patient and began hands-only CPR. He provided chest compressions until a Sunnyvale Department of Public Safety Officer arrived in a patrol car equipped with an Automated External Defibrillator (AED). The AED delivered a life-saving shock, effectively bringing Farid Rashti, 63, back to life.

“When someone suffers a sudden cardiac arrest, the heart stops beating without any warning so time is critical,” said Dr. Chad Rammohan, M.D., medical director of Cardiac Catheterization Lab and Chest Pain Center at El Camino Hospital and a Palo Alto Medical Foundation physician. “It’s the ‘electrical shock’ from the AED that helps to restore the person’s heartbeat and it’s the mechanical pumping from CPR that helps the SCA victim to recover some blood flow to vital organs such as the brain, heart, and the rest of the body.”

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A family history of heart disease coupled with a 2004 heart attack, resulting in quadruple bypass surgery, has led Rashti, a Campbell, Calif. resident, to live a healthy lifestyle. However, while playing soccer on March 25th, he was hit by the ball on the left side of his chest. He felt a sharp pain, unlike during his earlier heart attack. He switched to goalie where he could catch his breath when, he recalls “suddenly everything started to go black and that is the last thing I remember.” Rashti had suffered a SCA. The only way for a person to survive a SCA is to immediately receive 1) CPR, 2) an electrical shock from an AED, and 3) transport to the closest hospital emergency room.

“Thankfully the PulsePoint app alerted me to someone in need, only steps away, so I could put my training to good use and, as it turns out, help save a life,” said Huber, a Mission College student. “The fact that you could potentially save a life with this app confirms how important it is for everyone to learn CPR and download PulsePoint.”

“I’m so grateful that I was in public, surrounded by people,” said Rashti from his home where he’s been recovering. “Without my friends calling 9-1-1, the PulsePoint responder starting CPR and the patrol officer shocking me back to life with an AED, I would not be alive today.”

Santa Clara County, in which the City of Sunnyvale is located, was one of the first counties in the nation to fully integrate this technology with its 9-1-1 system. The collaboration and allocated resources from the Santa Clara County fire departments, the PulsePoint Foundation, El Camino Hospital, and the tech company Workday brought this lifesaving technology to Santa Clara County citizens. The coordinated effort by Santa Clara County, Rashti’s teammates, the PulsePoint-notified citizen responder and the care provided by the emergency room at Kaiser Permanente Santa Clara Medical Center helped save Rashti’s life.

“Every element in this chain of survival was enhanced by quick action and cutting edge technology. All Sunnyvale public safety officers are trained as police officers, firefighters and EMTs so they arrive on scene and immediately bring life-saving support with an AED and first aid equipment,” said Steve Drewniany, Deputy Chief of the Sunnyvale Department of Public Safety. “It was the quick action by Farid’s friends and Walter that set the entire response in motion. You couldn’t ask for a better example of how technology like PulsePoint and AEDs can save lives, which is why we’re making full use of them here in Sunnyvale.”

The PulsePoint mobile app is designed to reduce collapse-to-CPR and collapse-to-defibrillation times by increasing citizen awareness of cardiac events beyond a traditional “witnessed” area. The app also directs users to the precise location of nearby public AEDs. The free app is available for download on iTunes and Google Play.

About the PulsePoint Foundation
PulsePoint is a 501(c)(3) non-profit foundation based in the San Francisco Bay Area. Through the use of location-aware mobile devices PulsePoint is building applications that work with local public safety agencies to improve communications with citizens, empowering them to help reduce the millions of annual deaths from sudden cardiac arrest (SCA). Deployment of the PulsePoint app can significantly strengthen the “chain of survival” by improving bystander response to cardiac arrest victims and increasing the chance that lifesaving steps will be taken prior to the arrival of emergency medical services (EMS). PulsePoint is supported by the Wireless Foundation, built and maintained by volunteer engineers at Workday and distributed by our marketing and implementation partner Physio-Control, Inc. Learn more at www.pulsepoint.org or join the conversation at Facebook and Twitter.

About Sunnyvale Department of Public Safety
Located in the San Francisco Bay Area, the City of Sunnyvale Department of Public Safety is one of the largest fully-integrated Police, Fire, and Emergency Medical Services (EMS) public entities in the United States serving a City of over 147,000 residents. All of the Department’s Officers are fully qualified cross-trained Police Officers, Firefighters, and EMT-Basic professionals. Public Safety Officers fulfill these roles in their daily duties, ensuring the highest levels of efficiency and competency for the Sunnyvale community.

About El Camino Hospital
El Camino Hospital is an acute-care, 443-bed, nonprofit and locally governed organization with campuses in Mountain View and Los Gatos, California. In addition to heart and vascular care, key medical specialties include behavioral health, cancer, men’s health, neuroscience, orthopedic and spine, senior health, urology, and the first Women’s Hospital in Northern California. The hospital is recognized as a national leader in the use of health information technology and wireless communications, and has been awarded the Gold Seal of Approval from The Joint Commission as a Primary Stroke Center as well as back-to-back ANCC Magnet Recognitions for Nursing Care. To learn more, visit our website, find us on Facebook, follow us on Twitter, or view videos on YouTube. For a physician referral, visit our website or call the El Camino Health Line at 800-216-5556.

About Cardiac Arrest
Out-of-hospital cardiac arrest is a leading cause of death in the United States, accounting for an estimated 424,000 deaths each year, more than 1,000 deaths per day. The American Heart Association estimates that effective bystander CPR, provided immediately after cardiac arrest, can double or triple a person’s chance of survival. However, less than half of cardiac arrest victims receive bystander CPR and even fewer receive a potentially lifesaving therapeutic shock from a public access AED. Improving bystander CPR rates and access to AEDs is critical to chain of survival, which requires: (1) early recognition of the emergency and phoning 911 for EMS, (2) early bystander CPR, (3) early delivery of a shock via a defibrillator if indicated and (4) early advanced life support and post-resuscitation care delivered by healthcare providers.

Different than a heart attack, sudden cardiac arrest is caused when the heart’s electrical system malfunctions and the heart stops working properly. For every minute that passes without a SCA victim receiving resuscitation, the chances of that person surviving decrease 10 percent. After 10 minutes the chances of survival are minimal.

Source: Business Wire

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Media Assets

PulsePoint App Visuals
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SpacerSanta Clara County/SF Bay Area Responders (Map View)

Farid Rashti (Survivor)
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Walter Huber (PulsePoint Responder)
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SpacerChildhood Photo Walter Huber grew up wanting to be in public service. This picture was taken while Huber was just at toddler, sitting in a Sunnyvale fire truck.

Deputy Chief Steve Drewniany, City of Sunnyvale Department of Public Safety (DPS)
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Richard Price, Founder/President, PulsePoint Foundation
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Dr. Chad Rammohan
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SpacerCPR/AED Audio Recorded from Sunnyvale Police Officer’s Dash Cam Belt Mic

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LA Mayor Logo

March 7, 2015 | by

Los Angeles Mayor Eric Garcetti Opens LAFD PulsePoint Press Conference


Trouble viewing video?

The Los Angeles Fire Department (LAFD) formally launched PulsePoint on Wednesday, March 4th at an event at Woodrow Wilson High School in El Sereno where 120 students became CPR trained. Fire Chief Ralph M. Terrazas was joined by Los Angeles Mayor Eric Garcetti, LAUSD ESC-East Superintendent Roberto Martinez, PulsePoint Foundation President Richard Price and The Wireless Foundation Executive Director Athena Polydorou to discuss the LAFD’s rollout of the free PulsePoint app.

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News 3 (WISC-TV) Logo

February 5, 2015 | by

App could help Dane County citizens save lives

WISC-TV (CBS) News Story

Dane County residents are being asked to download a new smartphone app that could turn them into citizen first responders when someone is having a sudden cardiac arrest.

It’s called PulsePoint, and two Madison firefighters have worked to bring the technology that’s currently operating in cities like Los Angeles, Las Vegas and Cleveland to the Dane County 911 Center. When an emergency call for a cardiac arrest comes in, if the event is in a public place, an alert will be sent to those who have downloaded the app who are within one-quarter mile of the incident, at the same time that it’s sent to paramedics.

The goal is to crowd-source Good Samaritans, and get CPR help to victims before paramedics can arrive. The app provides instructions on how to do CPR in addition to directions to the person who suffered the cardiac arrest.

“We know there’s people out there with the training. We know there are people out there willing to help, and we know that they’re presently unaware many times of incidents that are close to them,” Madison firefighter Christopher Carbon said. “When you show up on scene and you do have bystander compressions going on, you immediately know the chances of survival are better.”

Last year, there were 547 sudden cardiac arrests in Dane County. The Pulse Point Foundation reports an estimated 325,000 people die every year in America from sudden cardiac arrest or roughly one every two minutes. Doctors say permanent brain damage or death can occur within eight minutes of a sudden cardiac arrest.

“Cardiac arrest, you know you hear that and you know it’s go-time,” said Madison firefighter Paul Britain, who worked with Carbon to bring Pulse Point to Dane County. “It’s happening all over, all the time.”

Evidence of how the app can work came last fall in Spokane, Washington, when a 911 call came in for a non-breathing baby at a ballet studio. The Pulse Point alert went out and using GPS technology, an alert popped up two blocks away on the phone of a local mechanic who volunteered as an EMT. He left the car he was working on, raced to the scene, administered CPR and saved the baby’s life before paramedics could get there.

“I thought that’s what it means,” Britain said after hearing about the Spokane story. “That’s what this project means to me. That’s how it works and that’s how it should work.”

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Carbon, who also works with Meriter Hospital, brought the idea to the medical center’s foundation, which agreed to pay at least $20,500 to install, operate and promote the program for its first year. National estimates are that 55-60 percent of all Americans have had some form of CPR training. Carbon said people want to help and the app gives them the chance to do so.

“It’s sort of like somebody opening the door and yelling outside for help, but just having a larger radius and more reach to it,” he said. “I do think the willingness to help is there. The excitement here is that people can return to their normal lives. People can enjoy their families and enjoy their careers and enjoy the things they were doing before the (cardiac arrest) happened. So, I think that’s where some of this excitement comes about. That when it works, it can work really well.”

Carbon and Britain believe Wisconsin’s Good Samaritan law protects those who would offer help to those in need. Further, they say the app tracks phones or places that phones are rather than people, thereby protecting the privacy of those who have the phones.

“There is an option to respond, it’s not an obligation,” Carbon said. “At the end of the day, I think we would always say, doing something is better than doing nothing.”

The app is available on both Apple and the Android phones.

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Richard Price TEDx

January 11, 2015 | by

The Heart of a Big Idea

In his recent TED Talk Richard Price, president of the PulsePoint Foundation, describes the original inspiration for the PulsePoint app and the challenges of advancing a big idea.

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