Bryan Hinds

June 29, 2014 | by

New Smartphone App Could Reduce Heart Attack Deaths

Rogers, AR — A new smartphone app is coming to Rogers, and it has the potential to help save lives. “PulsePoint” is a free app that notifies CPR certified people of a cardiac emergency nearby. When a 911 call is placed, the closest person in a public location that is certified to perform CPR will be alerted on their phone so they can respond before emergency crews arrive. The City of Rogers has been working to reduce the number of cardiac arrest deaths in the area for several years. They also want to increase the number of bystanders performing CPR.

Bryan Hinds of Rogers’ Fire Department says, “we were wanting to up that [CPR responses] percentage because we think we can significantly impact the number of survivals from cardiac arrest.”

View the full story on the NWA Homepage.

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Anderson County Dispatcher

June 14, 2014 | by

Smartphone app aims to save lives in Anderson County

ANDERSON, SC (FOX Carolina) – The Anderson County Sheriff’s Office is using a new high-tech tool that aims to turn ordinary bystanders into life-saving heroes.

Dispatchers in the county will now start pushing information to a new smartphone app called PulsePoint, which is an app that alerts CPR-trained bystanders about a nearby emergency where they may be able to help.

FOX Carolina

“You know the difference early CPR and defibrillation can make in a sudden cardiac arrest event. Fifty-seven percent of U.S. adults say they’ve had CPR training, and most would be willing to use CPR or an AED to help save a stranger’s life. Yet only 11 percent say they’ve used CPR in an actual emergency. That’s a number we can increase together,” PulsePoint says on its website.

The company also makes an app to help people locate automated external defibrillators (AEDs) nearby during cardiac emergencies.

It allows users to report the locations of AEDs whenever they see them, and that information is then shared with emergency dispatchers, who can share their location with people trained in CPR and off-duty firefighters, nurses and other professionals.

View the full story by Joseph Pereira at FOX Carolina.

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Portland Map on App

June 3, 2014 | by

Man reunites with firefighter who saved his life

PORTLAND, Ore. — It was a special reunion Tuesday morning for two men in Southeast Portland.

One is grateful to the other for saving his life, and it was all thanks to a phone app.

The meeting was the third for Drew Basse and Scott Brawner. Drew doesn’t remember the first time.
“I was not conscious at all,” he said. “I was completely incoherent.”

That was in a gym parking lot last month, he was having a heart attack.

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Scott performed CPR until rescue crews got there. But the off-duty firefighter and paramedic wouldn’t even have known Drew was in trouble if it wasn’t for the PulsePoint app on his phone.

Scott explained that an alarm goes off and, “If you do have a CPR call, then it will show the nearest location to that and help move the citizen responder to the closest position.”

He says you simple have to follow the dot on a map to find the person in trouble.

Drew knows Scott’s quick action and that app helped save his life.
“They need to make it make it mandatory on people’s phones. If you know CPR you should have the app on your phone.”

Anyone can download the PulsePoint app for free. You don’t even have to know CPR to have it. There’s a guide within the app and a timing to device to help you through “hands only CPR.”

View the newscast and full story by Mary Loos at KATU 2.

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PulsePoint AED

June 3, 2014 | by

PulsePoint App Aims To Get Emergency Care To Heart Attack Victims Quicker

An ingenious technology that’s saving lives in the Bay Area is now getting even more powerful. It’s a smartphone-based app that’s getting emergency care to heart attack victims much more quickly.

For ambulance crews, racing cardiac patients to the hospital is a life-saving routine. But often, it’s the first moments after a heart attack that make the difference.

“Success in the hospital for resuscitation is really dependent on rapid bystander CPR,” Chad Rammohan, M.D., said.

Rammohan is a director of the chest pain center at El Camino Hospital in Mountain View. Two years ago, the hospital helped launch a smartphone system designed to create an army of citizen CPR providers.

“And the best outcome is when there’s early defibrillation, meaning a defibrillator is available,” Rammohan said.

The system, known as PulsePoint was the brain child of former San Ramon Valley Fire Chief Richard Price.

When a cardiac call comes in to 911, the PulsePoint app can locate the closest trained responder via their smartphone and even help them perform CPR with an automated external defibrillator, known as an AED.

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“I’ll receive a tone on my phone and a map showing me exactly how to get where I am, to where the patient’s located,” says Price. “I’ve now arrived at the patient, so I’ve selected the CPR how to portion of the app.” he added.

Since being rolled out in Santa Clara County and the East Bay, the PulsePoint Foundation has expanded the system.

Beginning this year, the program now allows users to locate and mark the location of AEDs in schools and public buildings.

The goal is a powerful, searchable database that could locate the nearest defibrillator in an emergency. For photographer Brent Pederson the opportunity struck on a local tennis court, when he provided CPR to a player who’d collapsed with chest pain.

“So I just started pumping his chest and giving him mouth to mouth and we just kept it up for about 10 or 12 minutes until the medics arrived,” Pederson said.

Organizers are hoping the new features will help make the system even more powerful. Ultimately, stretching a life-saving safety net across the Bay Area.

View the newscast and full story by Eric Thomas at KGO-TV.

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Scott and Drew

June 3, 2014 | by

Smartphone app saves Milwaukie man’s life

CLACKAMAS, Ore. — A Milwaukie man believes a new smartphone app called PulsePoint saved his life when there were only minutes to spare.

May 9th seemed like a regular day for Drew Basse. The truck driver worked out at the 24-Hour Fitness on S.E. Sunnybrook Blvd. in Clackamas and then walked to his car.

Suddenly, he started feeling tired and light-headed. He doesn’t even remember what happened next: He had a massive heart attack.

“I was completely, completely gone,” Basse said as he talked to reporters from his bed at a rehabilitation center days later.

Luckily, a security guard had been watching and called Clackamas County 911, who sent out a PulsePoint alert. Off duty firefighter Scott Brawner was exercising inside the very same 24-Hour Fitness and his phone started buzzing.

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“When the app went off, I’d never heard it before. It turned my radio off and gave me a series of beeps,” Brawner said as he stood next to Basse’s hospital bed.

He had downloaded the app and checked the box that said he was willing to step in during an emergency nearby to give CPR.

The app brought up a GPS map with real-time locations of both men and that’s when Brawner saw the security guard kneeled down by Basse’s car door. He rushed over, saw that Basse, just seconds before, had a heart attack and he started doing hard and fast, hands-only CPR within one minute of the PulsePoint alert.

Paramedics came and Basse was brought back. He had surgery to install a pacemaker on his heart and will be recovering for the next six weeks. Doctors said he has no cognitive damage.

Both men are giving PulsePoint a lot of credit. “This PulsePoint app, it’s just a must,” Basse said. “It needs to get out to everybody, wherever people have a computer. They should make it mandatory on your phone.”

They also agree that it saved a life on May 9th.

“In a matter of minutes, somebody is there to save your life.” Basse said. “That’s what Scott did. He saved my life. I wouldn’t be here right now if it wasn’t for him.”

“I would love to see other people do the same thing,” Brawner said. “If you have the opportunity to do CPR, I mean just look at what we’ve given Drew back with everybody that’s helped him.”

Individual fire departments sign on to be a part of PulsePoint. It’s a non-profit and fairly new, so Clark County, Clackamas, and Tualatin Valley Fire and Rescue are the only local departments that have launched it at this time.

View the newscast and full story by Nina Mehlhaf at KGW.

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Rural/Metro FD

May 12, 2014 | by

Rural/Metro first in Arizona to use new emergency alert app

Rural/Metro FireWith a simple alert from your phone, you could help save a life.

“It means the community is now looking out for each other,” said Capt. Grant Cesarek with Rural Metro Fire, who says they are the first agency to start using PulsePoint.

PulsePoint is a free app for Android and iPhone, that tells you when emergency help is needed.

“Anyone that has their phone that’s been registered for the app and downloaded the app that’s within about 300 feet of a cardiac arrest event, would get a push notification and an alert that there’s a need for CPR,” said Cesarek.

Cesarek says the hope is that bystanders can start CPR before emergency crews arrive. The app will also walk someone through the steps of CPR if they don’t know how, and alert the user if there is an AED nearby to use as well.

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“If there’s a minute ahead of time before paramedics arrive then that’s a minute of good CPR and good blood flow and good circulation for that person,” he said.

The dispatch computers automatically send information to the app, so if Rural Metro gets a call and someone needs CPR, you get an alert.

“It’s all set up so that bystanders can be alerted and decide whether or not they want to help their own community members,” he said.

He says this technology will especially help in a near-drowning, where every second counts.

“There’s nothing wrong with us as firefighters and paramedics, showing up to a scene and CPR is started,” said Cesarek. “We say, ‘sir, ma’am, we’ll slide in,’ and then we take over from there.”

View the newscast and full story by Rikki Mitchell at KGUN9.

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West Tennessee Healthcare

February 26, 2014 | by

New App in West Tennessee Will Save Lives

WEST JACKSON– Seconds can separate life and death. First responders say they’re excited about the launch of a news app that will help them save lives.

Watch the ABC 7 Story.

Once downloaded, it notifies you if you’re within a mile of a CPR event in Madison, Benton, and Chester counties.

The app is called ‘PulsePoint’. It’s a free download in the Apple App Store and Google Play. Shannon Seaton with Emergency Management Services says it’s already had 400 downloads since its launch a few weeks ago.

The department is spreading the word and trying to get anyone connected who is certified in CPR.

If someone has a heart attack in your neighborhood, once the 9-1-1 operator has been dialed, it will go into the system and the alert will come through on your phone.

Medical experts say the first four to six minutes after a heart attack are crucial.

“It’s shown that after just a few minutes of oxygen to the brain, brain death can occur, so in that time it takes for EMS to get there, if CPR isn’t started, the chance of survival gets less and less,” Emily Garner with West Tennessee Heart and Vascular Center said.

She hopes that anyone that is CPR certified will download the app, and be a part of a community that saves lives.

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The List Logo

February 16, 2014 | by

Apps That Could Save Your Life

Technology is making it easy for strangers to save the day or even for you to keep the kiddos from catching the crud. You’re already carrying a medical device and it’s a smartphone full of life-saving apps.

First, turning everyday citizens into superheroes, the PulsePoint App notifies CPR Certified users if someone nearby, is having a cardiac emergency. The app also pinpoints the nearest defibrillator. Without one, the chances of survival for cardiac patients, decreases 10 percent each minute. The PulsePoint App is free

Next, Sleep Apnea Treatment Centers of America’s SnoreOMeter gives you information you can use to shame your significant other, but it can also help diagnose a serious underlying issue. Record your snore for up to 30 seconds, including any lapses in breathing, then rate the decibel level. The SnoreOMeter compares your snore to a jackhammer or a blow dryer. You can even put your friends to sleep when you share the results on Facebook. This app is also free.

And, the flu is no joke! Tracking hot zones is easy with the Sickweather App. It scours social media for posts with key words like ‘flu’ and ‘sick’, then lets you know when you’re approaching Sick Town. You can download Sickweather for free in the app store.

Trouble viewing video? Try this link to the original story.

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