Portland Map on App

June 3, 2014 | by

Man reunites with firefighter who saved his life

PORTLAND, Ore. — It was a special reunion Tuesday morning for two men in Southeast Portland.

One is grateful to the other for saving his life, and it was all thanks to a phone app.

The meeting was the third for Drew Basse and Scott Brawner. Drew doesn’t remember the first time.
“I was not conscious at all,” he said. “I was completely incoherent.”

That was in a gym parking lot last month, he was having a heart attack.

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Scott performed CPR until rescue crews got there. But the off-duty firefighter and paramedic wouldn’t even have known Drew was in trouble if it wasn’t for the PulsePoint app on his phone.

Scott explained that an alarm goes off and, “If you do have a CPR call, then it will show the nearest location to that and help move the citizen responder to the closest position.”

He says you simple have to follow the dot on a map to find the person in trouble.

Drew knows Scott’s quick action and that app helped save his life.
“They need to make it make it mandatory on people’s phones. If you know CPR you should have the app on your phone.”

Anyone can download the PulsePoint app for free. You don’t even have to know CPR to have it. There’s a guide within the app and a timing to device to help you through “hands only CPR.”

View the newscast and full story by Mary Loos at KATU 2.

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PulsePoint AED

June 3, 2014 | by

PulsePoint App Aims To Get Emergency Care To Heart Attack Victims Quicker

An ingenious technology that’s saving lives in the Bay Area is now getting even more powerful. It’s a smartphone-based app that’s getting emergency care to heart attack victims much more quickly.

For ambulance crews, racing cardiac patients to the hospital is a life-saving routine. But often, it’s the first moments after a heart attack that make the difference.

“Success in the hospital for resuscitation is really dependent on rapid bystander CPR,” Chad Rammohan, M.D., said.

Rammohan is a director of the chest pain center at El Camino Hospital in Mountain View. Two years ago, the hospital helped launch a smartphone system designed to create an army of citizen CPR providers.

“And the best outcome is when there’s early defibrillation, meaning a defibrillator is available,” Rammohan said.

The system, known as PulsePoint was the brain child of former San Ramon Valley Fire Chief Richard Price.

When a cardiac call comes in to 911, the PulsePoint app can locate the closest trained responder via their smartphone and even help them perform CPR with an automated external defibrillator, known as an AED.

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“I’ll receive a tone on my phone and a map showing me exactly how to get where I am, to where the patient’s located,” says Price. “I’ve now arrived at the patient, so I’ve selected the CPR how to portion of the app.” he added.

Since being rolled out in Santa Clara County and the East Bay, the PulsePoint Foundation has expanded the system.

Beginning this year, the program now allows users to locate and mark the location of AEDs in schools and public buildings.

The goal is a powerful, searchable database that could locate the nearest defibrillator in an emergency. For photographer Brent Pederson the opportunity struck on a local tennis court, when he provided CPR to a player who’d collapsed with chest pain.

“So I just started pumping his chest and giving him mouth to mouth and we just kept it up for about 10 or 12 minutes until the medics arrived,” Pederson said.

Organizers are hoping the new features will help make the system even more powerful. Ultimately, stretching a life-saving safety net across the Bay Area.

View the newscast and full story by Eric Thomas at KGO-TV.

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December 3, 2013 | by

Unique app alerts trained citizens to victim in their area who needs CPR

San Diego BOS Mtg 12/3/2013SAN DIEGO – The San Diego County Board of Supervisors unanimously agreed Tuesday to begin negotiations with the maker of a smartphone app that notifies people with CPR training that someone nearby is suffering sudden cardiac arrest.

County officials said sudden cardiac arrest occurs in outwardly healthy people, and claims nearly 1,000 lives daily throughout the country. It can be treated with early CPR, defibrillation, advanced cardiac life support and mild therapeutic hypothermia, which is most effective when started in three to five minutes

However, emergency response times are often six minutes or longer, Supervisor Ron Roberts said.

“Clearly the faster first responders can get to the victim, the greater the opportunity for saving lives,” Roberts said.

Read the full story by ABC 10News San Diego.

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May 20, 2013 | by

PulsePoint App growing in Sioux Falls

Avera Heart HospitalIf you saw a complete stranger having a cardiac arrest would you step in and help? In Sioux Falls the answer is yes. Hundreds of everyday citizens have already downloaded the Pulsepoint App and are just waiting to help save a life. In the KSFY Medical Minute Jake Iversen shows us how the program continues to grow in the Sioux Falls community.

Click here if video not displaying properly above.

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April 9, 2013 | by

New medical emergency smartphone app could help save lives

WXYZ DetroitDo you know CPR? Are you willing to help save a life?

Well, a new tool could enable you to act in the event of an emergency.

When someone is going into cardiac arrest, every minute counts. That’s why an app called PulsePoint helps put trained citizens at the scene of an emergency.

This app could really be the future of rescue operations. The app uses GPS and directs citizen rescuers to the exact location of the person in need of assistance.

Read the full article and watch the news segment by Alexandra Bahou at WXYZ-TV Channel 7.

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