Dane Co Incident Map

February 6, 2015 | by

Dane County Community Partners to Introduce Life-Saving Program

App Alerts Bystanders to CPR need

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE February 06, 2015

Contact:
Leah Huibregtse
Sr. Communications Strategist, Meriter–UnityPoint Health lhuibregtse@meriter.com
Work: (608) 417-5685; Cell (608) 516-2256

(MADISON, Wis.) – Meriter – UnityPoint Health, City of Madison Fire and Dane County EMS are proud to introduce the community to PulsePoint, a mobile app to help keep your heart beating in an emergency.

“Effective CPR given right after sudden cardiac arrest can significantly increase a victim’s chance of survival,” said Dr. Joseph Bellissimo, Cardiologist at Meriter – UnityPoint Health, which is funding PulsePoint through the Meriter Foundation. “We are thrilled that we are part of the team that’s bringing PulsePoint to our community.”

“PulsePoint is the result of the hard work and collaboration of a number of organizations in Dane County,” said Joe Parisi, Dane County Executive. “We know that people in our community are willing to help and this program connects them directly to those who need it most.”

Connected with the Dane County 911 Center, the PulsePoint app alerts CPR-trained bystanders when a sudden cardiac arrest occurs in a safe public place within their immediate vicinity. Users will be able to quickly find the victim and begin CPR immediately rather than idly waiting for EMS to arrive. The app also gives detailed instructions and locations of nearby automatic external defibrillators (AEDs).

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“We know that PulsePoint has saved lives elsewhere, and I am confident it will be successful here, too. The City is pleased to collaborate with Meriter-UnityPoint Health, Dane County EMS and the 911 Center in this project. This is a great success for the public we serve,” said Madison Mayor Paul Soglin.

“When it comes to cardiac arrest, every second counts. Every minute a person waits for help, their chances of survival decrease by as much as 10 percent,” said Madison Fire Chief Steven Davis. “We are always looking for new and innovative means to improve survival from cardiac arrest, and we are all looking forward to the potential success of this technology.”

PulsePoint is not limited to emergency responders or those with official CPR certification. It can be used by anyone who has been trained in CPR. Those looking for a CPR training course or more information on PulsePoint should visit meriter.com/pulsepoint

Download Source: Dane County Press Release (PDF)

Related: WISC-TV (CBS) News Story

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Steve Lopez, LA Times

August 10, 2014 | by

App could boost chances of cardiac arrest victims

Later this month I’ll be marking the two-year anniversary of my death.

That’s not a line you see too often, is it?

My heart gave out after knee surgery, because of an arrhythmia. Even for those who suffer cardiac arrest in a hospital, the survival rate is low. But I was lucky. A nurse quickly used CPR and brought me back from the dead in less than a minute.

CPR-needed Alert MapLast week while driving to work I heard my cardiologist, Dr. Leslie Saxon, on KNX-AM (1070) talking about a new app that could save the lives of those stricken by cardiac arrest. The Los Angeles County Fire Department is encouraging civilians to download the app and join a growing army of crowd-sourced good Samaritans — 13,000 so far — who can keep someone alive until emergency crews arrive.

Before I tell you how the app works and how simple it is to use, let me tell you why it’s so important.

Cardiac arrest is a leading cause of death, killing more than 1,000 people a day in the United States. The victims, who include children, often have no symptoms and consider themselves perfectly healthy. As opposed to a heart attack (a plumbing problem in which blood flow to the heart is blocked), cardiac arrest is the sudden loss of heart function caused by an electrical malfunction in which the heart’s pumping action is disrupted.

Without CPR — and I mean chest compressions, not mouth-to-mouth resuscitation — death can occur within minutes. That means a five-minute response to a 911 call might be too late.

“It’s going to take a community to impact the dismal survival rates for out-of-hospital cardiac arrest patients,” Saxon said.

The idea for the app was hatched several years ago by a Bay Area fire chief who thought there must be a way to put the 13 million people with CPR training to better use. So, what if the moment someone dialed 911 in a case of cardiac arrest, nearby civilians could be notified on their mobile phones and do CPR until paramedics arrive?

Richard Price, now retired from the San Ramon Valley Fire Department, helped establish a nonprofit that has now linked its PulsePoint app to emergency systems in about 200 California fire departments and several hundred more around the country. He said the Los Angeles Fire Department may be signing on soon.

“There have been some pretty significant stories of lives saved, directly attributable to the app,” Price said.

Most interventions, so far, have been by off-duty emergency responders who downloaded the app. But as Price points out, any civilian can learn CPR in a matter of minutes. The PulsePoint app itself has a “how-to” feature with a diagram on how to place the heels of the hands in the center of the chest and push down firmly and rapidly, about 100 times per minute.

If you have the app and you’re in the L.A. County Fire Department coverage area, you’ll get a beep on your iPhone or Android device if you’re within one-quarter mile of where the fallen person is. Although it might be best in some cases to simply do CPR until trained responders arrive, a related app will give you a map showing where the nearest portable Automated External Defibrillator, or AED, is located.

Even if you’re not comfortable using one, you might be able to alert someone who is. Not all cases of cardiac arrest call for an AED, but the machines are designed for quick diagnosis, with clear and simple instructions on safe use by lay persons.

Price said it will take some time for the location of all AEDs to be loaded into the app. And it’s going to take some time, as well, for AEDs to become more prevalent. Concerns about cost ($1,200 or more per unit) and legal liability have impeded wider use.

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Bob Roy, a Riverside man whose 14-year-old son, Travis, went into cardiac arrest at his middle school in 2005 and later died, has been lobbying to require schools to have AEDs.

“You’re a hundred times more likely to need an AED than a fire extinguisher, and which of those two are required by law?” asked Roy, who has helped place dozens of the devices in schools through the nonprofit thetravisfund.org.

Former state Sen. Joe Simitian, now a Santa Clara County supervisor, said resistance to AEDs is based in part on fears of legal liability if the devices malfunction. But the technology has improved dramatically since regulations were written, he said, and it may be time to legislatively broaden legal protection for those willing to try to save someone’s life.

More people die each year from cardiac arrest than from lung, breast, prostate and colon cancer combined. And Dr. Frank Pratt, medical director for the L.A. County Fire Department, says it’s time for cardiac arrest to be addressed with the same urgency.

“If this number of people were dying from an infection or a defect in an automobile or a stove, there’d be a national uproar,” Pratt said. “The PulsePoint app gives us an opportunity to reinvigorate the dialogue on the whole public health problem of sudden cardiac arrest.”

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LA Times Logo

August 6, 2014 | by

LA County Fire Dept. cardiac arrest app to ‘crowd-source good Samaritans’

Hoping to turn regular cellphone-toting Angelenos into rapid responders, the Los Angeles County Fire Department has linked its dispatch system to a cellphone app that will notify CPR-trained good Samaritans when someone in a public place nearby is having a cardiac arrest.

The app, called PulsePoint, sends Fire Department alerts out to mobile phone users at the same time that dispatchers send the official message out to emergency crews — increasing the possibility that a cardiac arrest victim can get life-saving CPR from a bystander while medical responders are still on the way, department officials said Wednesday.

The program also provides cardiopulmonary resuscitation instructions and the location of defibrillators nearby.

“Every person who knows CPR, downloads this app and activates it has their own fire department radio in their pocket,” said Fire Department medical director Dr. Franklin Pratt. “They become the first first responder.”

Enlisting nearby citizens who are prepared to deliver “hands-only CPR” — hard and fast compressions in the center of the chest — could greatly improve survival rates among cardiac arrest sufferers, Los Angeles County fire officials said.

Fire Chief Daryl L. Osby, who was on hand for a press event in Inglewood debuting the system, told The Times that the average emergency crew response time for his department was 5 minutes countywide, and sometimes longer in lower-density, far-flung communities such as Lancaster and Palmdale.

“If a citizen can begin CPR before the paramedics arrive, it increases survival,” he said.

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Medical director Pratt said that when the heart stops beating, the opportunity for survival with a good quality of life diminishes after about 3 or 4 minutes because of injury to the brain and changes in the body that make the heart less responsive. But in the first couple of minutes after cardiac arrest there’s still oxygen in the blood, he added. Immediate CPR can keep that oxygen flowing to the brain.

View the full story by Eryn Brown at the Los Angeles Times.

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Los Angeles County Seal

August 6, 2014 | by

PulsePoint App Now Available to Los Angeles County

Mobile app empowers CPR-trained users and off-duty professionals to provide help immediately after cardiac arrest

Contact:
Captain Tom Richards
C: (213) 247-8524
O: (323) 881-2472

LOS ANGELES – August 6, 2014 – To aid cardiac arrest victims quickly, the Los Angeles County Fire Department, The PulsePoint Foundation and The Wireless Foundation are making the PulsePoint app available to individuals in the Los Angeles County area today. Aimed at average citizens and off-duty professionals trained in CPR, the app alerts registered users when a sudden cardiac arrest occurs in a public place in their immediate vicinity. Informed at the same time as emergency responders, users are given detailed instructions, including the location of automatic external defibrillators (AEDs) nearby.

More than 13,000 people in Los Angeles County have already downloaded the app, but local promotional campaigns are in development to help raise awareness among the County’s more than 4 million residents. The leading cause of death in the U.S., cardiac arrests outside hospitals are responsible for more than 1,000 deaths a day and 424,000 a year. Effective CPR administered immediately after a cardiac arrest can potentially double or triple the victim’s chance of survival, but less than half of victims receive that immediate help.

“Widespread deployment of the PulsePoint app can significantly strengthen the Chain of Survival by increasing the chance that lifesaving steps will be taken by CPR-trained individuals prior to the arrival of our personnel,” said Los Angeles County Fire Chief Daryl Osby. “Mobile technology can help us build a safer, more resilient community, and thanks to the donation by The Wireless Foundation, PulsePoint is available to Los Angeles County at no cost to our organization.”

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“This is a perfect example of the ‘connected life’ that provides enormous benefits for all thanks to this very simple concept, which is to alert CPR-trained individuals to a nearby cardiac arrest situation so they may assist until the professional responders arrive on the scene,” said Meredith Attwell Baker, President of The Wireless Foundation and President and CEO of CTIA-The Wireless Association. “If you’re CPR-trained, please download the PulsePoint app now to help save a life.”

In addition to the PulsePoint app, the Los Angeles County Fire Department will be launching PulsePoint AED app to help locate and record all public access defibrillators in the county for use during cardiac arrest emergencies. Once validated, these crowdsourced AED will be visible in the PulsePoint app as well as for dispatcher use during emergency calls. The PulsePoint apps are available for iPhone and Android and can be downloaded from the iTunes Store™ and Google Play™.

About the Los Angeles County Fire Department
Founded in 1923, the Los Angeles County Fire Department is an international leader of the fire service, and one of the largest emergency service agencies in the world. Each day, more than 900 emergency responders are on duty to provide fire protection, life safety and environmental protection services to more than four million residents and commercial businesses in Los Angeles County’s 2,296-square-mile area. When called into action following major international disasters, the Department’s Urban Search and Rescue Team responds around the globe as members of California Task Force 2. Once back in Los Angeles County, these same elite responders can be found at work in hometown neighborhoods in 58 cities and unincorporated areas. The Department proudly continues to be a frontrunner in firefighting technology, offering specialized training opportunities in Urban Search and Rescue, Emergency Medical Services, Hazardous Materials, Air Operations and Homeland Security. Behind the scenes, more than 800 dedicated business professionals help carry out the mission. Learn more at www.fire.lacounty.gov.

About the PulsePoint Foundation
PulsePoint is a 501(c)(3) non-profit foundation based in the San Francisco Bay Area. Its mission is to make it much easier for citizens who are trained in CPR to use their life-saving skills to do just that…save lives! Through the use of modern, location-aware mobile devices PulsePoint is building applications that work with local public safety agencies to improve communications with citizens and empower them to help reduce the millions of annual deaths from sudden cardiac arrest. Deployment of the PulsePoint app can significantly strengthen the “chain of survival” by improving bystander response to SCA victims in public settings and increasing the chance that lifesaving steps will be taken prior to the arrival of emergency medical services (EMS) professionals. PulsePoint is built and maintained by volunteer engineers at Workday and distributed by Physio-Control of Redmond, WA. The original idea came from Richard Price, the former chief of the San Ramon Valley Fire Department, who wanted to bridge the gap between the critical minutes following SCA and the 13 million Americans who are CPR trained, but often don’t know their skills are required. Learn more at www.pulsepoint.org or join the conversation at www.facebook.com/PulsePoint and @PulsePoint.

About The Wireless Foundation
The Wireless Foundation is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit dedicated to developing and supporting initiatives that use wireless technology to help American communities. The Foundation’s innovative programs benefit consumers in areas such as education, healthcare, safety and the environment. The Foundation was formed by CTIA-The Wireless Association® member companies in 1991. Learn more at www.wirelessfoundation.org.

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Los Angeles County Seal

August 5, 2014 | by

Los Angeles County Launches Pulsepoint CPR “Citizen Responder” Mobile App

Press Conference August 6, 2014, 10 A.M.

Home Depot, 3363 W. Century Boulevard, Inglewood

 

Contact: Contact: Contact:
Fire Inspector Rick Flores Amy Storey Shannon Smith
Los Angeles County Fire Department The Wireless Foundation PulsePoint Foundation
213-200-1829 202-736-3207 616-724-4256
rflores@fire.lacounty.gov astorey@ctia.org ssmith@smithmediarelations.com

 

WHAT: Los Angeles County is launching PulsePoint, a free mobile app that alerts registered users whenever a cardiac arrest occurs in a public place in their immediate vicinity. Informed at the same time as emergency responders, bystanders are given detailed instructions, including the location of the nearest automatic external defibrillator (AED), and can begin hands-only CPR until responders arrive. County officials will join PulsePoint Founder Richard Price and The Wireless Foundation to talk about how this mobile technology will aid cardiac arrest victims quickly and will improve survivability in Los Angeles County.

PulsePoint Demonstration: Following all remarks, a live narrated demonstration of how the PulsePoint app works will take place. A “victim” will experience a sudden cardiac arrest in the parking lot adjacent to the press conference podium. A “Good Samaritan” trained in CPR will receive a phone alert while inside the Home Depot and will run out to provide chest compressions while responders are dispatched. Los Angeles County Fire Station 173 personnel will arrive to simulate patient care and transport.

WHEN: Wednesday, August 6, 2014, 10 A.M

WHO:

  • Los Angeles County Second District Supervisor Mark Ridley-Thomas
  • Los Angeles County Fire Chief Daryl L. Osby
  • Dr. Franklin Pratt, Medical Director, Los Angeles County Fire Department
  • Athena Polydorou, Executive Director, The Wireless Foundation
  • Richard Price, Founder and President of the PulsePoint Foundation
  • Danny Gutierrez and Roslyn De La Torre, Bystander CPR Good Samaritans
  • Sudden Cardiac Arrest Victim Elbert Kirby, along with his wife Wanda Kirby

*Note: Fire Inspector Rick Flores will be available for Spanish language interviews.
A sign language interpreter will also be present.

WHERE: Home Depot Store, 3363 W. Century Boulevard, Inglewood

WHY: Survivability rates for sudden cardiac arrest are less than 8% nationwide and approximately 6% in Los Angeles County. Every two minutes, someone dies from sudden cardiac arrest. Survivability depends greatly on receiving immediate CPR. PulsePoint will provide immediate notification to those nearby who can provide chest compressions to double or triple a victim’s chance of survival. Learn CPR. Get the App. Save a Life.

VISUALS:

  • 40-foot PulsePoint promotional banner draped between two Los Angeles County Fire Department ladder trucks behind speaker area
  • A live, narrated demonstration of how PulsePoint works
  • Hands-Only CPR training booth featuring customized LACoFD CPR training kits
  • A Public Service Announcement video will be provided at the event (thumb drive)

Check-In, Refreshments:
A media check-in table will be provided.
Refreshments provided by Company 77 Pizza, courtesy of The Wireless Foundation.

We Thank Our Partners:
Special thanks to The Wireless Foundation, the PulsePoint Foundation, and Physio-Control for their generous partnership in launching this lifesaving app in Los Angeles County.

Press Conference Host:
Battalion Chief Anderson Mackey, LACoFD Public Affairs

Learn CPR.  Get the App.  Save a Life.

#PulsePointLA

Web: Social Media:
www.fire.lacounty.gov www.facebook.com/LACoFD
www.pulsepoint.org www.twitter.com/LAC0_FD
www.wirelessfoundation.org www.youtube.com/user/LosAngelesCountyFD
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San Diego Logo Trio

July 28, 2014 | by

San Diego County, City, Fire Partners Activate Life-saving CPR App

Technology Helps Citizens Become Heroes

NEWS RELEASE
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
July 28, 2014
Contacts: County: Michele Clock 619-531-4506
City: Lee Swanson 619-533-3780

Every minute a victim of sudden cardiac arrest waits for CPR, their chance of survival drops by up to 10 percent.

After four to six minutes, brain damage begins to occur.

After 10 minutes, it’s often too late. Few resuscitation attempts succeed.

Now PulsePoint, an innovative new smartphone application, lets citizens trained in CPR know when their help is needed, allowing them to step in during those critical moments before a paramedic arrives. It is now available in the San Diego region, thanks to the County and a coalition of local agencies.

County Supervisors Ron Roberts and Bill Horn, San Diego Mayor Kevin L. Faulconer, San Diego County Fire Chiefs’ Association President Dave Hanneman and other local fire and government officials on Monday announced the arrival of the cutting-edge technology at a news conference at San Diego Fire-Rescue Department’s Fire Station 1.

“Sudden cardiac arrest is a leading cause of death in our country, and just 8 percent of those who experience it survive,” Supervisor Ron Roberts said. “We can do better. This app can help us change these grim statistics.”

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The region is one of the largest in the U.S. to launch the app, which was developed by the Pleasanton, California-based nonprofit PulsePoint Foundation and distributed by Redmond, Washington-based emergency medical device company Physio-Control, Inc. San Diego joins the more than 500 localities around the nation that have begun using the app. Also available on Monday is compression-only CPR training from local ambulance providers Rural/Metro and American Medical Response.

“San Diego is again on health care’s leading edge by adopting this technology,” said Mayor Kevin L. Faulconer. “It is going to allow us as citizens to help one another in previously unimaginable ways. But it’s up to us to get trained, download this tool and use it.”

Mayor Kevin Faulconer

“Most of us have a friend or loved one who has suffered with a heart condition,” said Supervisor Bill Horn. “Sudden cardiac arrest can happen to one of those individuals, or out of the blue to any of us, at any time. You never know who or when you may be in the right place at the right time to help someone, thanks to this app.”

When a 9-1-1 call for sudden cardiac arrest comes in, an alert goes to the app at the same time first responders are dispatched. Citizens who are signed up for the app and nearby the incident are notified of the location of the victim as well as the closest publicly accessible AEDs.

How effective the app is in a community depends on citizen involvement. Get trained in CPR and sign up to receive the alerts. The American Red Cross, American Heart Association, and San Diego Project Heartbeat provide trainings throughout the year. You never know, you may just help save someone’s life! So please download the app through Google play or the Apple App store. Also available through PulsePoint is a companion app called PulsePoint AED, which allows the public to register the locations of publicly accessible AEDs in their community.

Cox Communications is supporting this program by airing this public service announcement (PSA) promoting the PulsePoint app on local cable channels. For more information, visit the County’s PulsePoint information page or to download the apps, visit PulsePoint.

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PulsePoint AED Logo

June 21, 2014 | by

PulsePoint AED (v1.1) is available in the store today

PulsePoint AED v1.1Among several usability improvements you’ll also find:

  • Landmark icons (such as restaurants, gas stations, etc.) are now suppressed in the map display to provide greater visibility of AED icons
  • A new “spotlight” map mask to indicate the area searched for the currently displayed AEDs
  • AED photos now support rotation

Plus, so much more in the works…

PulsePoint AED on the App Store on iTunes

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NationSwell Logo

June 18, 2014 | by

An App That Turns Everyday Bystanders Into Everyday Heroes

PulsePoint saves lives by improving the way we respond to those in distress.

Justin Sullivan/Getty ImagesWhen an airplane passenger is in physical distress, the flight attendant calls through the speakers asking if medical professionals are on board. It’s a simple action that can make a huge difference. What if we could mimic this same outreach, 10,000 feet below, everyday on the ground?

That’s exactly what the smart phone app PulsePoint (for download here) makes possible, according to Emergency Management. Using the gadgets we all carry every day, municipalities that use the free mobile service are able to send out alerts to CPR-certified citizens who are nearby someone in need. In many cases, there are just a few minutes between life and death, so every second counts. By quickening response times, this app can help save lives — before an ambulance is even in sight.

PulsePoint doesn’t replace dispatched responders, but as fast as ambulances and emergency medical technicians try to arrive, they’re often not quick enough. Once 9-1-1 is dialed and the available crew is actually with the patient, it can be too late – making those that can arrive quicker a vital resource.

San Jose became the first area city to use PulsePoint in 2012 — the app’s founder and CEO, Richard Price, is from the area, having worked as an ex-fire chief of the San Ramon Valley Fire Protection District. Since then, it’s caught on thanks to support from a local hospital and the results it provides. A local hospital is also planning a public registry of automated defibrillators through a new, related app, PulsePoint AED.

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With decreasing local budgets for emergency response, increasing populations and traffic congestion, the demand for innovations like PulsePoint is greater than ever. By alerting off-duty first responders, medical professionals, and other CPR certified individuals of a nearby need, PulsePoint turns them into valuable lifesavers, all with the tap of a phone, making the app early — and effective — when time means everything.

View the full story by Harrison Potter at NationSwell.

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