February 15, 2014 | by

App to help heart attack victims

PulsePoint turns anyone into a first responder if there’s a cardiac arrest nearby

Sudden cardiac arrest? There’s an app for that.

Joe Simitian, Santa Clara County Supervisor for District 5 and Mike Wasserman, President of the Santa Clara County Board of Supervisors, representing District 1

Santa Clara County Supervisors Joe Simitian and Mike Wasserman

Health and safety officials from Mountain View and around the county are endorsing the local launch of the PulsePoint system, a mobile app that alerts users when someone nearby is having a heart attack, giving good Samaritans the chance to lend a potentially life-saving hand until emergency responders arrive.

PulsePoint functions as a direct link between individuals and local emergency dispatchers. Starting Feb. 14, the app’s local launch date, 911 dispatch centers in Santa Clara County will have the ability to send out a location-based alert to PulsePoint users in the vicinity of a reported heart attack, according to a press release from El Camino Hospital.

“It’s an Amber Alert for cardiac arrest victims,” said Richard Price, president of the PulsePoint Foundation and the former chief of the San Ramon Valley Fire Protection District.

The application comes with built-in guides that train people in basic “hands-only” cardio-pulmonary resuscitation (CPR) which, Price said, can be learned in minutes and has the potential to make the difference between life and death.

“This is really all about response times,” Price said, explaining that when it comes to sudden cardiac arrest, every minute counts. When someone’s heart stops beating, brain damage can set in after about six minutes and without intervention in the first 10 minutes, the likelihood of death is nearly certain. Very often, he said, “the emergency response crews can’t get there in time”

Basic, hands-only CPR rapid, two-inch-deep chest compressions can help prevent brain damage and keep a person alive until EMTs or paramedics arrive.

“Bystander CPR use is critical,” Price said.

According to the American Heart Association, about 1,000 people have an out-of-hospital cardiac arrest in the U.S. every day, but only 32 percent of cardiac arrest victims receive CPR from a bystander. Given statistics like those, Price said he figures that the more people that adopt the PulsePoint app, the better. “We’re pretty much putting a radio in everybody’s hand, so we can dispatch people,” he said.

Jaime Garrett, public information officer for the Mountain View Fire Department, said the department is looking forward to the PulsePoint launch.

“It really increases our community members’ chances of survival should a cardiac arrest or a cardiac incident happen in a public place,” Garrett said. “With any cardiac incident, the sooner CPR is initiated, the better the chances of survival. It gives our residents the tools necessary to be able to respond in a timely manner.”

Garrett, like Price, recommended that everyone with an Android, or iOS device download the app. PulsePoint can be found in the Apple App Store and the Android marketplace on the Google Play site.

Anyone with the PulsePoint app on a mobile device will get a notification of cardiac events occurring within a quarter mile of their location at the time the alert is issued. The app’s users will also be given directions from their location to the site of the reported victim, as well as information on any nearby automated external defibrillators a device that uses electricity to restart the heart of victims of cardiac arrest.

Price, who developed the app in coordination with cloud application maker Workday, said the idea first came to him when he was on a lunch break during his tenure as chief of San Ramon Valley Fire.

He was in uniform, eating his lunch, when an ambulance pulled up outside the restaurant. Someone was having a heart attack in the building next door and he had no idea it was happening.

“It was a pretty shocking experience,” Price recalls especially considering the fact that he could have helped if he only had known. “That was the genesis of the app.”

View the entire news story by Nick Veronin at the Mountain View Voice.

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January 26, 2014 | by

Smart phone app to help save lives

ABC News12SAGINAW COUNTY (WJRT) – When a heart attack strikes, seconds matter.

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death in the United States, topping cancer and strokes.

Two local organizations are doing everything they can to connect people with technology that saves lives.

The Pulse 3 Foundation and Mobile Medical Response are using a smart phone app. It’s called PulsePoint. It’s free and you can find it in the app store on your phone.

“It’s an amazing app,” said Lynn Schutter, Director of Communications at Mobile Medical Response.

When seconds matter, “You need to act immediately in instances of cardiac arrest,” Schutter said.

According to Schutter, Saginaw County averages one heart attack a day.

“Our response times are six and eight minutes, within the city of Saginaw,” Schutter said.

“If an ambulance gets to you in six minutes, which is a phenomenal response time, your chance of living is already down to 40 percent, so we want to get help to you as soon as we can,” said Diane Fong, CEO of Pulse 3 Foundation.

While emergency crews are on the way, they’ll use PulsePoint to save time and lives.

“An alert will go out when it’s in a public location,” Fong said.

“Similar to an amber alert,” Schutter said.

If someone is having a heart attack, 911 will dispatch an ambulance, and MMR will send an alert through the app to get the attention of people nearby who are trained in CPR. PulsePoint also lets them know where the nearest automated external defibrillator can be found.

“We are the only service provider to bring the Pulse app to the state of Michigan,” Schutter said.

Right now, the feature is only available in Saginaw, Isabella, Gratiot and Clare counties. More than 3,000 people have already signed up to get the alerts, and the search is on for more volunteers.

“What we want is people who are willing to step in to help,” Fong said.

“If we can get bystanders to step in and give that immediate help while we are on the way, we can really save a life,” Schutter said.

Read the full story by Candace Burns at ABC.

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January 25, 2013 | by

Emergency CPR Mobile App Could Save Lives

techvibes-logoCrowdsourcing is changing the way we handle digital information. It helps us distribute tasks, share photos, fund projects, and expand our professional networks.

Through a clinical trial in Toronto, one company is poised to take crowdsourcing in Canada a step further with a CPR app that could save lives.

The PulsePoint Foundation, a non-profit organization based in the San Francisco Bay Area, has developed the PulsePoint app to help victims who have gone into sudden cardiac arrest. The app alerts people in the area who have CPR training when someone nearby is experiencing a cardiac event.

Using the app, which is available for Android and iOS, 911 dispatchers will send out a message to users in the vicinity. If you have the PulsePoint app on your smartphone, you’ll immediately receive a notification, whether you’re in the grocery store, the mall, or even at a hockey game.

Read the full article by Taryn McMillan at Techvibes.

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