December 23, 2013 | by

Fargo-Moorhead Fire Departments Unveil Emergency App

Fargo FD AppA new smart phone application will enable people in the community to help out in emergency situations around the Fargo-Moorhead area. The fire departments in Fargo and Moorhead unveiled the app in a joint news conference Monday.

The app is called PulsePoint. Once you download the app, you then select your location and mark certain emergencies you’d like to be notified about. Users who are trained in cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) are notified if someone nearby is having a cardiac emergency and may require CPR. If you decide to allow push notifications, you can also choose to be alerted during fire alarms, motor vehicle crashes, or medical emergencies, just to name a few.

As long as the GPS on your smart phone is turned on, and you are within a quarter-mile of the emergency, you will receive a notification. When you get an alert, you also have the option to see how many automated external defibrillators (AED) are in the area and where they are located.

The fire departments say the quicker victims are able to get help in an emergency, the better. They say the app will give users CPR instructions and other directions similar to those that dispatchers at Red River Regional Dispatch would give over the phone if you were to call 911. The app follows guidelines recommended by the American Heart Association regarding hands-only CPR.

Although not everyone may feel comfortable helping in an emergency situation, emergency responders say any type of assistance before they arrive could make a huge difference in an emergency situation.

“With only one quarter of all cardiac arrests victims receiving CPR, PulsePoint increases the odds that CPR and defibrillation will be provided even before emergency crews arrive on scene. Improving the chances of survival after a cardiac arrest,” explains Fargo Fire Chief Steve Dirksen.

Read the full story at NBCNews.com

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December 7, 2013 | by

Need to Save a Life? There’s an App for That.

Three years ago, San Ramon Valley Fire Chief Richard Price was eating dinner when he heard ambulance sirens. Someone next door had suffered a cardiac arrest and was unconscious.

“That whole time, while that crew was making their way to the scene, I had an AED in my car. I could’ve started CPR,” says Price. This event made Price realize that the system in place to help people during a cardiac crisis is not good enough. So, he — like many health care innovators today — turned to technology to enhance our society’s ability to save lives.

Every year, around 383,000 sudden cardiac arrests occur in the U.S. and less than eight percent of people who suffer them outside of a hospital survive. That’s because the first few minutes after cardiac arrest are vital to survival. After a person’s heart stops beating, brain damage can occur in four to six minutes. By 10 minutes, there is almost no chance of survival.

Even in Price’s former fire district, which he said had many advantages, ambulance response times were seven minutes in the city, eight in the suburbs, and fifteen in rural areas. Quality CPR given immediately after cardiac arrest can double, even triple, the chance of survival but this can only happen if CPR-trained people nearby know that someone needs their help.

That is the exact problem that Price is working to remedy.

Rather than merely reflecting on his experience as an unfortunate inevitability, Price was resolved to find out what more he could do to prevent similar situations in the future. That is how he came up with PulsePoint, an app that notifies CPR-trained bystanders of nearby cardiac arrests.

Read the full post by Taylor Kubota at the Xerox Healthbiz Decoded blog.

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November 11, 2013 | by

Here’s how to save a life

Daniel and Charlette SandersAfter Scott Hansen’s heart gave out last year, strangers used its power to give him another chance at life. When Bill Pelow’s heart stopped in 2011, Daniel Velazquez became his lifeline because of it.

Charlette Sanders isn’t a widow today and her children have a father because she learned the lifesaving technique during an emergency conversation with 911 operator Amy Breitenbach.

Cardiopulmonary resuscitation, better known as CPR, the only known method of keeping someone alive until medically necessary treatment can be administered, saves tens of thousands of lives in heart-related crises annually in the United States alone.

But as wonderful as that is, it is also true that tens of thousands of other Americans die because CPR isn’t used. The American Heart Association reports that less than one-third of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest victims — there are about 400,000 each year — receive CPR from a bystander.

David Slattery, Las Vegas Fire and Rescue’s medical director, said studies show that Americans find intervening “very scary” because they’re not medically trained and that fear often paralyzes them.

Considering that cardiac arrest survival falls an estimated 7 percent to 10 percent for every minute without CPR and that it takes an average of four to six minutes across the country for rescue personnel to arrive, the low rate of bystander CPR plays a critical role on outcomes.

Less than 8 percent of people who suffer cardiac arrest outside the hospital survive.

Read the full post by Paul Harasim at the Las Vegas Review-Journal.

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November 9, 2013 | by

Heart Health Demystified with Mobile Tech

iPad ECGAccounting for 600,000 deaths per year, heart disease is the leading cause of death for men and women in the United States. With the help of technology, however, you can monitor your diet, track workouts and make lifestyle changes to help decrease the risk of heart disease.

First, use technology to keep track of important vitals that can affect your heart health. The Heart Health 2 app allows you to record your blood pressure, cholesterol, blood glucose levels, pulse and other stats. Not only can you have a better idea of these factors, but you can share this information with your doctors to help them better evaluate your needs.

Exercise is key to a healthy heart, and today’s apps make it possible to track your activity and your heart rate. The Withings Pulse Activity Tracker, for example, offers an app that lets you monitor activity levels, food intake, heart rate and sleep quality from your mobile device anytime day or night. You can also use the American Heart Association’s Walking Paths app to find new routes and track your daily walks.

Read the full post by Karen Schulz at the Verizon Wireless News Center.

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September 19, 2013 | by

American Heart Association and Las Vegas FD Teach CPR and PulsePoint to 1,000 at Community Event

LAS VEGAS (KSNV & MyNews3) — Some local experts are teaching people how to save lives Wednesday.

News 3’s Denise Rosch was downtown as tourists and locals were pulled off the street for a mass CPR training session.

This is the American Heart Association’s hands only CPR training.


Click here if video not displaying properly.

A free, 15-minute session designed to teach as many people as possible the simple technique of proper chest compressions.

Melanie Baldwin is living proof, it works. In June her husband performed CPR on her when she collapsed, in full cardiac arrest. Now she’s helping spread the word that the life you save could be someone you love.

“My husband was my traumatized than I was, because you want to be able to help, you don’t want to feel helpless,” Baldwin said.

According to the American Heart Association, 90 percent of sudden cardiac arrest victims die before reaching the hospital.

But immediate CPR can double or even triple a victim’s chance of survival. Exactly what this event is all about.

The goal was to teach 1,000 people this simple procedure in the next five days and ask them, to turn around and teach someone else.

There is also an app for this.

“Your phone will send you an alert you’re within 200 yards of where somebody needs CPR,” said Chief Wille McDonald of Las Vegas Fire.

It’s called Pulse point and is free through iTunes. Las Vegas Fire Chief Willie McDonald says you can monitor fire calls right from your smartphone.

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August 14, 2013 | by

Saving lives through an app

ArvadaPressSmart phones these days can do much more than just making a call — and now that includes saving a life.

The Arvada Fire Protection District launched its own channel on the PulsePoint smart phone app on Aug. 5.

Once someone downloads the free app and sets Arvada Fire as their host location, the app alerts the user if a person in a nearby public place goes into cardiac arrest and needs hands-only CPR.

“All you need is CPR knowledge, you don’t have to be certified, just have knowledge of how to do chest compressions and it will notify you if CPR is needed in a public place within walking distance of where you are,” said Arvada Fire public information officer Scott Pribble.

Using GPS technology, the app notifies users about emergencies within about a 1,000 foot radius of where they are in a public place, such as a store, restaurant or park.

“I know it has saved lives,” Pribble said.

Read the full story by Sara Van Cleve at Our Colorado News.

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August 5, 2013 | by

PulsePoint app tells users someone nearby needs CPR

Fox31DenverARVADA, Colo. — The Arvada Fire Department is teaming up with a smart phone app developer in an effort to mix altruism with geo-location technology to save lives.
PulsePoint is a free app that can help someone who is having sudden cardiac arrest.

Users register through the app that they know CPR. The app will then notify the user if someone nearby is having cardiac arrest. It gives directions to the victim as well as show any nearby defibrillators.

The app is activated by 911 dispatchers and alerts go to anyone within walking distance of the victim, that is CPR trained and is willing to help.

The notifications are also only made if the victim is in a public place such as a mall or park, said Arvada fire spokesman Scott Pribble.

Read the full story by Thomas Hendrick at FOX31 Denver (KDVR).

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August 5, 2013 | by

New Arvada Fire Channel app launched by Arvada Fire could save a life

ARVADA – Arvada Fire launched the PulsePoint application on the Arvada Fire Channel, which could potentially help save lives.

Click here if video not displaying properly.

The free application notifies registered users of a cardiac arrest that has occurred in a public place nearby. PulsePoint puts out a map giving directions to the person, the location of the AEDs in the area, and in the future, it will also provide the radio traffic of the emergency responders.

To sign up for this application, a person has to be willing to do “hands-only” CPR, and the Good Samaritan Law covers anyone who is willing to help.

For iPhone users, PulsePoint can be searched and directly downloaded from the App Store. Android users can find the app under the same name on Google Play.

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August 5, 2013 | by

Turn Your Smart Phone into a Life Saver

Arvada FPD LogoARVADA – Your smart phone can do so many things from keeping your life on schedule, to checking your social media status and even playing games. Now your phone can help you save a life.

On Monday, August 5th, Arvada Fire will launch the Arvada Fire channel on the smart phone application, PulsePoint. The free PulsePoint app, which is available in your phone’s app store, will notify registered users of a cardiac arrest that has occurred in a public place that is in their vicinity. The app will give the citizen responder mapping directions, it will notify them of any automatic external defibrillators (AEDs) that are in the area and will, in the near future, even provide the radio traffic of the emergency responders.
When a person goes into sudden cardiac arrest, their heart, lungs and brain no longer receive the oxygen that they need to survive. For every minute that they do not receive chest compressions, their chance of survival decreases by 10%. Quick math would tell you that they would have zero chance of survival after just 10 minutes. That is why it is so important to get this process started before emergency responders arrive on the scene.

So, you want to help but mouth-to-mouth grosses you out? No problem. To sign up for this app, you only need to be willing to do “Hands-Only” CPR. According to the American Heart Association, Hands-Only CPR has been shown to be as effective as conventional CPR in the first few minutes of an out-of-hospital sudden cardiac arrest. Have you been trained in CPR but your card has expired? No problem. You do not need to be CPR certified to participate in this program. The Good Samaritan Law covers anyone who is willing to help as long as they do not attempt to do more than they are trained to do.

We are available to do interviews for the morning shows if you are interested. Shots could include an interview about how the app works and a brief lesson on “Hands-Only” CPR.

ABOUT PULSEPOINT
PulsePoint is a 501(c)(3) non-profit foundation based in the San Francisco Bay Area. Their mission is to make it much easier for citizens who are trained in CPR to use their life saving skills to do just that…save lives! Through the use of modern, location-aware mobile devices PulsePoint is building applications that work with local public safety agencies to improve communications with citizens and empower them to help reduce the millions of annual deaths from sudden cardiac arrest.

See more at: www.pulsepoint.org

Contact
Scott Pribble, Public Information Officer
Deanna Harrington, Public Information Officer
303-425-9203

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June 5, 2012 | by

“Heart of Gold” Award Presented to Chief Price

After receiving the 2012 “Heart of Gold” award from Jill DiGiacomo, Executive Director for the American Heart Association, Fire Chief and PulsePoint President Richard Price delivered these comments on Saturday, June 2, 2012 at the Wente Vineyards Gala in Livermore, California.

Chief Price addresses guests at AHA Heart of Gold Ball

Chief Price addresses guests at the Heart of Gold Ball

“I would like to express my sincere appreciation to the American Heart Association Board of Directors and to the Heart of Gold Nominating Committee for selecting me for this honor tonight.

I would also like to congratulate Dr. Khan, my co-honoree this evening, for his well-deserved recognition.

I would like to thank my wonderful wife Lisa, who runs our household everyday, so that I can be the community’s 24/7 Fire Chief, while still squeezing in a little foundation work each evening – and occasional weekend.

My beautiful 9-year old daughter Halle is here tonight. At $500 a plate, I told her she would probably be the only kid here, and that looks to be true. I’m certain that this is the first time she has been served Filet Mignon and a glass Cabernet Sauvignon. Hang in there little girl, we’re almost done. And I’m surrounded tonight with more of my family and friends including my parents, Richard and Sallie Price.

1,000 Americans die every day from Sudden Cardiac Arrest, making it the leading cause of death in the U.S. But many of these deaths could be prevented if CPR was initiated, and an AED was deployed, in the first few minutes after an arrest. Over the past 50 years, 300M people have been trained in CPR, yet today, CPR is only performed in about 25% of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest cases. And publicly available AED’s, the ones you see in airports, schools and other places of assembly, are retrieved and used only 1% or 2% of the time when available – primarily because lay rescuers don’t think about them, and don’t know where to find them.

Without intervention, a cardiac arrest victim has only about 10 minutes to live. But as we have heard tonight CPR suspends time, essentially stopping that 10-minute clock, and sustains life until more advanced care can arrive. So after 10 minutes you have no chance of survival; and brain damage begins several minutes before that. To put that into context consider the paramedic response time, right now, to this facility is about eight minutes. Not much room for error. This excruciatingly short window of opportunity is exactly why most people do not survive a sudden cardiac arrest. Today, more than ever, citizens helping citizens is the only way for the Chain of Survival to truly work. Local government response times are not improving in this economy – if anything they are getting worse.

Instead of relying on fate to place a CPR-trained citizen in the exact location needed at the exact time needed, the PulsePoint app is used to dispatch nearby CPR-trained citizens simultaneously with the dispatch of local paramedics, so CPR can begin immediately. The app also directs these citizens, with a live map, to the nearest AED.

This video tribute produced by Heart.org was played before Chief Price was invited to the stage.

In the Greater Bay Area we have some of the finest cardiac care facilities in the world. But if patients arrive at these hospitals already dead, our best doctors and our latest procedures have no opportunity to make any difference at all. So therein lies the promise of the PulsePoint App – to deliver patients that are still alive, so they can benefit from all the innovation and interventions that are available to cardiac patients today.

The PulsePoint Foundation has a talented and diverse board of directors drawn from public safety, tech, medicine and finance. It includes Dave Duffield from Workday who’s engineering team built the enterprise-class PulsePoint service for the foundation; Dr. Ben Bobrow, Medical Director for the State of Arizona who is also the Chair of the American Heart Association Basic Life Support Subcommittee; and Don Ledoux, with Summit Financial, who is here tonight representing the PulsePoint board.

The mission of the foundation is to extend the reach of the app around the globe and to do that at no cost to the implementing fire or EMS agency. If you would like to join us in this mission please reach out to me. We need your help.

Events like this are a tremendous amount of work and require the combined efforts of many people, including many volunteers. This is a very special night for my family and I, and we thank everyone that had a hand in bringing us together for this important cause. I believe the PulsePoint app represents a revolutionary step forward in cardiac arrest survival and I’m thrilled to be here tonight sharing that vision with an audience that also holds a very strong commitment to that goal.

Thank you.”

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