LA Times Logo

August 6, 2014 | by

LA County Fire Dept. cardiac arrest app to ‘crowd-source good Samaritans’

Hoping to turn regular cellphone-toting Angelenos into rapid responders, the Los Angeles County Fire Department has linked its dispatch system to a cellphone app that will notify CPR-trained good Samaritans when someone in a public place nearby is having a cardiac arrest.

The app, called PulsePoint, sends Fire Department alerts out to mobile phone users at the same time that dispatchers send the official message out to emergency crews — increasing the possibility that a cardiac arrest victim can get life-saving CPR from a bystander while medical responders are still on the way, department officials said Wednesday.

The program also provides cardiopulmonary resuscitation instructions and the location of defibrillators nearby.

“Every person who knows CPR, downloads this app and activates it has their own fire department radio in their pocket,” said Fire Department medical director Dr. Franklin Pratt. “They become the first first responder.”

Enlisting nearby citizens who are prepared to deliver “hands-only CPR” — hard and fast compressions in the center of the chest — could greatly improve survival rates among cardiac arrest sufferers, Los Angeles County fire officials said.

Fire Chief Daryl L. Osby, who was on hand for a press event in Inglewood debuting the system, told The Times that the average emergency crew response time for his department was 5 minutes countywide, and sometimes longer in lower-density, far-flung communities such as Lancaster and Palmdale.

“If a citizen can begin CPR before the paramedics arrive, it increases survival,” he said.

Full Story

Medical director Pratt said that when the heart stops beating, the opportunity for survival with a good quality of life diminishes after about 3 or 4 minutes because of injury to the brain and changes in the body that make the heart less responsive. But in the first couple of minutes after cardiac arrest there’s still oxygen in the blood, he added. Immediate CPR can keep that oxygen flowing to the brain.

View the full story by Eryn Brown at the Los Angeles Times.

Less Story
Los Angeles County Seal

August 6, 2014 | by

PulsePoint App Now Available to Los Angeles County

Mobile app empowers CPR-trained users and off-duty professionals to provide help immediately after cardiac arrest

Contact:
Captain Tom Richards
C: (213) 247-8524
O: (323) 881-2472

LOS ANGELES – August 6, 2014 – To aid cardiac arrest victims quickly, the Los Angeles County Fire Department, The PulsePoint Foundation and The Wireless Foundation are making the PulsePoint app available to individuals in the Los Angeles County area today. Aimed at average citizens and off-duty professionals trained in CPR, the app alerts registered users when a sudden cardiac arrest occurs in a public place in their immediate vicinity. Informed at the same time as emergency responders, users are given detailed instructions, including the location of automatic external defibrillators (AEDs) nearby.

More than 13,000 people in Los Angeles County have already downloaded the app, but local promotional campaigns are in development to help raise awareness among the County’s more than 4 million residents. The leading cause of death in the U.S., cardiac arrests outside hospitals are responsible for more than 1,000 deaths a day and 424,000 a year. Effective CPR administered immediately after a cardiac arrest can potentially double or triple the victim’s chance of survival, but less than half of victims receive that immediate help.

“Widespread deployment of the PulsePoint app can significantly strengthen the Chain of Survival by increasing the chance that lifesaving steps will be taken by CPR-trained individuals prior to the arrival of our personnel,” said Los Angeles County Fire Chief Daryl Osby. “Mobile technology can help us build a safer, more resilient community, and thanks to the donation by The Wireless Foundation, PulsePoint is available to Los Angeles County at no cost to our organization.”

Full Story

“This is a perfect example of the ‘connected life’ that provides enormous benefits for all thanks to this very simple concept, which is to alert CPR-trained individuals to a nearby cardiac arrest situation so they may assist until the professional responders arrive on the scene,” said Meredith Attwell Baker, President of The Wireless Foundation and President and CEO of CTIA-The Wireless Association. “If you’re CPR-trained, please download the PulsePoint app now to help save a life.”

In addition to the PulsePoint app, the Los Angeles County Fire Department will be launching PulsePoint AED app to help locate and record all public access defibrillators in the county for use during cardiac arrest emergencies. Once validated, these crowdsourced AED will be visible in the PulsePoint app as well as for dispatcher use during emergency calls. The PulsePoint apps are available for iPhone and Android and can be downloaded from the iTunes Store™ and Google Play™.

About the Los Angeles County Fire Department
Founded in 1923, the Los Angeles County Fire Department is an international leader of the fire service, and one of the largest emergency service agencies in the world. Each day, more than 900 emergency responders are on duty to provide fire protection, life safety and environmental protection services to more than four million residents and commercial businesses in Los Angeles County’s 2,296-square-mile area. When called into action following major international disasters, the Department’s Urban Search and Rescue Team responds around the globe as members of California Task Force 2. Once back in Los Angeles County, these same elite responders can be found at work in hometown neighborhoods in 58 cities and unincorporated areas. The Department proudly continues to be a frontrunner in firefighting technology, offering specialized training opportunities in Urban Search and Rescue, Emergency Medical Services, Hazardous Materials, Air Operations and Homeland Security. Behind the scenes, more than 800 dedicated business professionals help carry out the mission. Learn more at www.fire.lacounty.gov.

About the PulsePoint Foundation
PulsePoint is a 501(c)(3) non-profit foundation based in the San Francisco Bay Area. Its mission is to make it much easier for citizens who are trained in CPR to use their life-saving skills to do just that…save lives! Through the use of modern, location-aware mobile devices PulsePoint is building applications that work with local public safety agencies to improve communications with citizens and empower them to help reduce the millions of annual deaths from sudden cardiac arrest. Deployment of the PulsePoint app can significantly strengthen the “chain of survival” by improving bystander response to SCA victims in public settings and increasing the chance that lifesaving steps will be taken prior to the arrival of emergency medical services (EMS) professionals. PulsePoint is built and maintained by volunteer engineers at Workday and distributed by Physio-Control of Redmond, WA. The original idea came from Richard Price, the former chief of the San Ramon Valley Fire Department, who wanted to bridge the gap between the critical minutes following SCA and the 13 million Americans who are CPR trained, but often don’t know their skills are required. Learn more at www.pulsepoint.org or join the conversation at www.facebook.com/PulsePoint and @PulsePoint.

About The Wireless Foundation
The Wireless Foundation is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit dedicated to developing and supporting initiatives that use wireless technology to help American communities. The Foundation’s innovative programs benefit consumers in areas such as education, healthcare, safety and the environment. The Foundation was formed by CTIA-The Wireless Association® member companies in 1991. Learn more at www.wirelessfoundation.org.

###

Less Story
Los Angeles County Seal

August 5, 2014 | by

Los Angeles County Launches Pulsepoint CPR “Citizen Responder” Mobile App

Press Conference August 6, 2014, 10 A.M.

Home Depot, 3363 W. Century Boulevard, Inglewood

 

Contact: Contact: Contact:
Fire Inspector Rick Flores Amy Storey Shannon Smith
Los Angeles County Fire Department The Wireless Foundation PulsePoint Foundation
213-200-1829 202-736-3207 616-724-4256
rflores@fire.lacounty.gov astorey@ctia.org ssmith@smithmediarelations.com

 

WHAT: Los Angeles County is launching PulsePoint, a free mobile app that alerts registered users whenever a cardiac arrest occurs in a public place in their immediate vicinity. Informed at the same time as emergency responders, bystanders are given detailed instructions, including the location of the nearest automatic external defibrillator (AED), and can begin hands-only CPR until responders arrive. County officials will join PulsePoint Founder Richard Price and The Wireless Foundation to talk about how this mobile technology will aid cardiac arrest victims quickly and will improve survivability in Los Angeles County.

PulsePoint Demonstration: Following all remarks, a live narrated demonstration of how the PulsePoint app works will take place. A “victim” will experience a sudden cardiac arrest in the parking lot adjacent to the press conference podium. A “Good Samaritan” trained in CPR will receive a phone alert while inside the Home Depot and will run out to provide chest compressions while responders are dispatched. Los Angeles County Fire Station 173 personnel will arrive to simulate patient care and transport.

WHEN: Wednesday, August 6, 2014, 10 A.M

WHO:

  • Los Angeles County Second District Supervisor Mark Ridley-Thomas
  • Los Angeles County Fire Chief Daryl L. Osby
  • Dr. Franklin Pratt, Medical Director, Los Angeles County Fire Department
  • Athena Polydorou, Executive Director, The Wireless Foundation
  • Richard Price, Founder and President of the PulsePoint Foundation
  • Danny Gutierrez and Roslyn De La Torre, Bystander CPR Good Samaritans
  • Sudden Cardiac Arrest Victim Elbert Kirby, along with his wife Wanda Kirby

*Note: Fire Inspector Rick Flores will be available for Spanish language interviews.
A sign language interpreter will also be present.

WHERE: Home Depot Store, 3363 W. Century Boulevard, Inglewood

WHY: Survivability rates for sudden cardiac arrest are less than 8% nationwide and approximately 6% in Los Angeles County. Every two minutes, someone dies from sudden cardiac arrest. Survivability depends greatly on receiving immediate CPR. PulsePoint will provide immediate notification to those nearby who can provide chest compressions to double or triple a victim’s chance of survival. Learn CPR. Get the App. Save a Life.

VISUALS:

  • 40-foot PulsePoint promotional banner draped between two Los Angeles County Fire Department ladder trucks behind speaker area
  • A live, narrated demonstration of how PulsePoint works
  • Hands-Only CPR training booth featuring customized LACoFD CPR training kits
  • A Public Service Announcement video will be provided at the event (thumb drive)

Check-In, Refreshments:
A media check-in table will be provided.
Refreshments provided by Company 77 Pizza, courtesy of The Wireless Foundation.

We Thank Our Partners:
Special thanks to The Wireless Foundation, the PulsePoint Foundation, and Physio-Control for their generous partnership in launching this lifesaving app in Los Angeles County.

Press Conference Host:
Battalion Chief Anderson Mackey, LACoFD Public Affairs

Learn CPR.  Get the App.  Save a Life.

#PulsePointLA

Web: Social Media:
www.fire.lacounty.gov www.facebook.com/LACoFD
www.pulsepoint.org www.twitter.com/LAC0_FD
www.wirelessfoundation.org www.youtube.com/user/LosAngelesCountyFD
Full Story
Drew in Wheelchair

June 4, 2014 | by

Heart Attack Rescue? There’s an App for That

A new smartphone app that aims to turn ordinary bystanders into heart attack heroes did just that last month, saving the life of a 57-year-old truck driver from Portland, Oregon, who had collapsed outside a gym.

Drew Basse is the first high-profile rescue attributed to PulsePoint, a free mobile app that alerts users when someone is in cardiac arrest nearby.

“Without people like Scott Brawner, I wouldn’t have had a second chance,” said Basse, referring to the off-duty local firefighter who answered the PulsePoint ping.

Basse, a father of two and grandfather to four, is recovering in a Portland rehabilitation center after the May 9 incident that Brawner said was the highlight of his 34-year career.

“I can’t believe that it worked,” said Brawner, 52, of Tualatin, Oregon. “It was just awesome. It still gives me chills.”

Full Story

Created on a shoestring budget by Richard Price, a former San Ramon, California, fire chief who didn’t want to miss an emergency call, PulsePoint has gained slow traction since 2009, rolling out to 911 dispatch centers that now cover some 600 U.S. cities.

“We’ve found that people are very willing to put their hand up and say, ‘I’ll help,’” said Price. More than 140,000 people have signed up for PulsePoint so far and more than 7,300 have responded to nearly 2,300 alerts.

Every year in the U.S. there are about 360,000 out-of-hospital cardiac arrests, or about 1,000 a day. Experts who research the problem say PulsePoint may be one way to boost the ranks of those who can perform bystander CPR, which doubles or triples the chances of surviving.

“It’s a great use of technology to enlist the aid of people who are willing and able to help save lives from cardiac arrest,” said Dr. Michael Sayre, an emergency medicine doctor with the University of Washington in Seattle and an leader in resuscitation medicine.

In Basse’s case, he was saved by Brawner, who happened to be working out at the same gym. Brawner’s fire district signed up for PulsePoint about a year ago.

But even he wasn’t expecting the alert that showed up on his phone as he walked on the treadmill, telling him that someone needed CPR, or cardiopulmonary resuscitation, right away. He saw a map, an icon of where he was, an icon showing the closet AED or automated external defibrillator — and an icon showing a victim. He quickly ran down two flights of stairs.

“I saw a security guard standing in the parking structure and it just didn’t look right to me,” Brawner said. “That’s where Drew Basse was. He was literally sitting in his car, unconscious, not breathing, no pulse.”

In fact, Brawner thought he looked like a “fresh code,” firefighter slang for someone who is already dead.

Brawner pulled Basse out of his car and started performing CPR. Within minutes, emergency crews arrived and took over, but the time that Brawner kept Basse’s blood pumping was crucial, doctors said.

That’s just what PulsePoint founder Price, 52, had in mind. He was a veteran of 32 years as a firefighter and fire chief, focused on improving bystander CPR and rapid response.

He was at lunch one day when he heard sirens and saw a fire truck pull right up to the business next door. “I wasn’t even aware of it,” he said. “I was actually in uniform. I had an AED in my car. We just weren’t plugged into those types of calls.”

Using technical skill gleaned from years of operating dispatch centers, Price worked with engineering interns from Northern Kentucky University to develop the app. Now, it’s updated and maintained by the firm Workday, which provides technical services for free.

View the full story by JoNel Aleccia at NBC News.

Less Story
PulsePoint AED

June 3, 2014 | by

PulsePoint App Aims To Get Emergency Care To Heart Attack Victims Quicker

An ingenious technology that’s saving lives in the Bay Area is now getting even more powerful. It’s a smartphone-based app that’s getting emergency care to heart attack victims much more quickly.

For ambulance crews, racing cardiac patients to the hospital is a life-saving routine. But often, it’s the first moments after a heart attack that make the difference.

“Success in the hospital for resuscitation is really dependent on rapid bystander CPR,” Chad Rammohan, M.D., said.

Rammohan is a director of the chest pain center at El Camino Hospital in Mountain View. Two years ago, the hospital helped launch a smartphone system designed to create an army of citizen CPR providers.

“And the best outcome is when there’s early defibrillation, meaning a defibrillator is available,” Rammohan said.

The system, known as PulsePoint was the brain child of former San Ramon Valley Fire Chief Richard Price.

When a cardiac call comes in to 911, the PulsePoint app can locate the closest trained responder via their smartphone and even help them perform CPR with an automated external defibrillator, known as an AED.

Full Story

“I’ll receive a tone on my phone and a map showing me exactly how to get where I am, to where the patient’s located,” says Price. “I’ve now arrived at the patient, so I’ve selected the CPR how to portion of the app.” he added.

Since being rolled out in Santa Clara County and the East Bay, the PulsePoint Foundation has expanded the system.

Beginning this year, the program now allows users to locate and mark the location of AEDs in schools and public buildings.

The goal is a powerful, searchable database that could locate the nearest defibrillator in an emergency. For photographer Brent Pederson the opportunity struck on a local tennis court, when he provided CPR to a player who’d collapsed with chest pain.

“So I just started pumping his chest and giving him mouth to mouth and we just kept it up for about 10 or 12 minutes until the medics arrived,” Pederson said.

Organizers are hoping the new features will help make the system even more powerful. Ultimately, stretching a life-saving safety net across the Bay Area.

View the newscast and full story by Eric Thomas at KGO-TV.

Less Story
PulsePoint AED Logo

June 3, 2014 | by

PulsePoint Foundation and Physio-Control Launch App to Build Comprehensive Automated External Defibrillator (AED) Registry

PulsePoint AED Will Complement Lifesaving PulsePoint Respond App

(LAS VEGAS, Nevada) – June 3, 2014 – PulsePoint AED, a new mobile application designed to build a comprehensive registry of automated external defibrillators (AEDs) available for use during cardiac emergencies, was released today by the PulsePoint Foundation at the Emergency Cardiovascular Care Update (ECCU) 2014 Conference in Las Vegas, Nevada. The PulsePoint Foundation is a non-profit organization dedicated to providing mobile technologies to help everyday citizens save lives. Physio-Control, the leading provider of emergency medical response technologies worldwide, is the marketing and implementation partner of the Foundation.

When a cardiac emergency strikes, finding an automated external defibrillator (AED) can help save a life. But that takes knowing where AEDs are located. “The PulsePoint AED registry is one of the largest and fastest growing defibrillator databases in the world,” said Richard Price, president of the PulsePoint Foundation. “The new PulsePoint AED app strengthens the chain of survival for cardiac arrest victims by empowering CPR/AED-aware citizens to report up-to-date AED location information to local authorities and to make that information immediately available to dispatchers and trained bystanders nearby.”

Full Story

Once the location of AEDs enters the database via the PulsePoint AED app, all validated AED’s become visible in the PulsePoint Respond app, which means that AED information is provided to the local emergency communications center for instant display on dispatcher consoles during calls for assistance. This allows the dispatchers to direct callers to public AEDs near them during an emergency.

“PulsePoint AED is a great way for agencies to build comprehensive AED registries while involving local citizens. Users of PulsePoint and subscribing local emergency responders all get updated information about the AEDs in their communities,” said Cameron Pollock, Vice President of Marketing, Physio-Control, Inc. “With PulsePoint AED and PulsePoint Respond, citizens, responders and medical care providers can effectively work together in their communities to help save lives.”

“Keeping AED location information current is a significant challenge,” said Jeff Helm, Division Chief, Sioux Falls Fire Rescue in South Dakota. “PulsePoint AED will increase community awareness of AED locations and will simplify the task of discovering devices missing from our registry.” In 2012 Sioux Falls Fire Rescue received the Harvard University Kennedy School of Government Ash Institute’s Bright Ideas Award for their public access defibrillator (PAD) program.

“We are pleased to continue our partnership with the PulsePoint Foundation on another life-saving resource for our community,” said Tomi Ryba, president and chief executive officer of El Camino Hospital in California. “This week is National CPR and AED Awareness Week and the launch of the PulsePoint AED app is a great opportunity for our community to actively participate in identifying local AEDs and educating themselves about the life-saving potential of CPR and AEDs.”

PulsePoint AED is the second app created by the PulsePoint Foundation. PulsePoint Respond was launched in 2011 and empowers everyday citizens to provide lifesaving assistance to victims of sudden cardiac arrest. Last month in Portland, Oregon, off-duty firefighter Scott Brawner was working out at a local health club when he received an alert through PulsePoint Respond. Brawner responded and performed CPR until advanced care arrived. Alerts provided by the PulsePoint Respond app helped save the cardiac arrest victim’s life. The PulsePoint Respond app has been downloaded more than 200,000 times to date.

PulsePoint AED and PulsePoint Respond are available to the public free of charge for Apple iOS and Google Android devices from the Apple App Store and Google Play. Engineering for both applications is provided by volunteers at Workday, Inc. Public safety agencies interested in implementing PulsePoint may contact their local Physio-Control representative or call 800-442-1142.

About sudden cardiac arrest

SCA is a leading cause of death in the United States, accounting for an estimated 325,000 deaths each year/1,000 deaths per day. The American Heart Association estimates that effective bystander CPR, provided immediately after sudden cardiac arrest, can double or triple a person’s chance of survival. However, only about one quarter of SCA victims receive bystander CPR and even fewer receive a potentially lifesaving therapeutic shock from a public access AED. Improving bystander CPR rates and access to AEDs is critical to survival.

About Physio-Control

Physio-Control, Inc. is headquartered in Redmond, Washington. The company operates in over 100 countries and is the world’s leading provider of professional emergency medical response solutions that predict or intervene in life threatening emergencies. To learn more visit www.physio-control.com, or connect at www.facebook.com/physiocontrolinc, https://www.linkedin.com/company/physio-control-inc-or @PhysioControl

About the PulsePoint Foundation

PulsePoint is a 501(c)(3) non-profit foundation based in the San Francisco Bay Area. Its mission is to make it much easier for citizens who are trained in CPR to use their life saving skills to do just that…save lives! Through the use of modern, location-aware mobile devices PulsePoint is building applications that work with local public safety agencies to improve communications with citizens and empower them to help reduce the millions of annual deaths from sudden cardiac arrest. Learn more at www.pulsepoint.org or join the conversation at http://www.facebook.com/PulsePoint and @PulsePoint.

# # #

Media Contact:

Matt Fikse, Tel: 425-867-4208, Email: matt.fikse@physio-control.com

Less Story
iPhone AED Photo

June 3, 2014 | by

El Camino Hospital Collaborates With PulsePoint Foundation To Launch Crowd-Sourced Automatic External Defibrillator (AED) Registry

Santa Clara County first in the nation to launch innovative AED app

MOUNTAIN VIEW, Calif., June 3, 2014 – Today, El Camino Hospital, in collaboration with the PulsePoint Foundation, announced the launch of the second PulsePoint mobile app, PulsePoint AED, which is designed to build the most comprehensive registry of public automated external defibrillators (AED) available for use during sudden cardiac emergencies. Santa Clara County is the first to roll out this new app, which is available for free download from the iTunes Store and Google Play.

In conjunction with the launch of the PulsePoint AED app, El Camino Hospital is hosting an AED Location Contest, where participants locate and submit unregistered AEDs in Santa Clara County using the PulsePoint AED app. The top three winners will each receive a prize, such as an iPad.

“We are pleased to continue our partnership with the PulsePoint Foundation on another life-saving resource for our community,” said Tomi Ryba, president and chief executive officer of El Camino Hospital. “This week is National CPR and AED Awareness Week and the launch of the AED app is a great opportunity for our community to actively participate in identifying local AEDs and educating themselves about the life-saving potential of CPR and AEDs.”

Full Story

“We are grateful for the ongoing support from El Camino Hospital and the PulsePoint Foundation in educating our community around the importance of CPR and AED use, “ said Chief Ken Kehmna, Santa Clara County Fire District. “This latest app is a vital resource in providing the most updated information on public AEDs to emergency first responders and CPR-trained citizen responders alike.”

The American Heart Association estimates that immediate cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) and early defibrillation with an AED can more than double a victim’s chance of survival. Yet, finding the nearest AED can be difficult at the time of a sudden cardiac emergency. The PulsePoint AED app enables users to report and update public AED locations simply by taking a photo of the AED using their iPhone or Android mobile phone and uploading the photo and location information to the registry. All validated information uploaded into the registry is also provided to the local emergency communications center for real-time display on dispatcher consoles during calls for assistance. Additionally, the app is integrated with the existing PulsePoint Respond CPR app, alerting CPR-trained citizen bystanders of the nearest AED location in the event of a sudden cardiac emergency.

For more information about the PulsePoint apps, please visit: www.elcaminohospital.org/CPRHelpNow

About El Camino Hospital
El Camino Hospital is an acute-care, 443-bed, nonprofit and locally governed organization with campuses in Mountain View and Los Gatos, Calif. In addition to state-of-the-art emergency departments, key medical specialties include behavioral health, cancer care, genomic medicine, heart and vascular, neuroscience, orthopedic and spine, senior health, urology, and the only Women’s Hospital in Northern California. The hospital is recognized as a national leader in the use of health information technology and wireless communications, and has been awarded the Gold Seal of Approval from The Joint Commission as a Primary Stroke Center as well as back-to-back ANCC Magnet Recognitions for Nursing Care.

To learn more, visit our website, find us on Facebook, follow us on Twitter, or view our videos on YouTube. For a physician referral, visit our website or call the El Camino Health Line at 800-216-5556.

About the PulsePoint Foundation
PulsePoint is a 501(c)(3) non-profit foundation based in the San Francisco Bay Area. Its mission is to make it much easier for citizens who are trained in CPR to use their life-saving skills to do just that…save lives! Through the use of modern, location-aware mobile devices PulsePoint is building applications that work with local public safety agencies to improve communications with citizens and empower them to help reduce the millions of annual deaths from sudden cardiac arrest. Learn more at www.pulsepoint.org. Follow the PulsePoint Foundation on Facebook and Twitter.

Media Contact:
Chris Ernst, 650-962-5853
chris.ernst@elcaminohospital.org

Less Story
Spokane County PulsePoint Launch

April 13, 2014 | by

PulsePoint Increases Community Awareness of AEDs

SVFD ReenactmentYour chances of surviving a heart attack at Spokane Valley City Hall soon will improve.

After learning about a new effort that uses smartphones to alert CPR-trained volunteers to life-threatening emergencies nearby, city leaders decided to purchase a heart-jolting automated external defibrillator that paramedics say can dramatically improve chances of surviving sudden cardiac arrest.

The easy-to-use medical device, which cost about $1,250, is set to arrive in the next couple of weeks.

“I think we were kind of surprised when we realized there wasn’t one here,” said Deputy Mayor Arne Woodard.

The decision came after the City Council was told last month that Spokane-area fire departments are mapping the locations of AEDs in publicly accessible sites countywide.

The electronic map is part of a smartphone app called PulsePoint that’s linked to the county’s 911 system and alerts trained volunteers to emergencies at the same time that paramedics are being dispatched. The app guides volunteers to the location of the emergency and also shows whether any AEDs are nearby.

Full Story

It’s available for free in the Apple App Store or Android Apps on Google Play. Volunteers must register.

Once the city’s new AED arrives, City Hall will be added to the PulsePoint map.

So far, authorities have mapped 102 publicly accessible AEDs in Spokane Valley and they expect that number to climb rapidly over the next year because firefighters now will be asking business owners about the availability of the devices while doing annual site checks, said Fire Chief Bryan Collins.

The Spokane Fire Department and several rural fire protection districts also are mapping AED locations.

The app was developed in northern California where Collins worked before being hired in Spokane Valley.

On average, at least two people a day go into sudden cardiac arrest across Spokane County, said Collins, and chances of survival improve the quicker CPR or AED treatment is initiated.

The PulsePoint app uses smartphone GPS technology to determine whether any CPR volunteers are near the scene of an emergency and alerts them that help is needed. The goal is to get at least hands-only CPR initiated within the first three to five minutes of sudden cardiac arrest.

See the original article on The Spokesman-Review.

Less Story

February 14, 2014 | by

El Camino Hospital And Fire Departments Of Santa Clara County Launch Free CPR “Citizen Responder” Mobile Phone App

Citizen CPR, Provided Immediately After Sudden Cardiac Arrest,
Can Double or Triple a Person’s Chance of Survival

PulsePoint Alerts CPR-Trained Bystanders That Someone Nearby May Require CPR

PulsePoint/ECH Special Event Signage

PulsePoint Press Conference

MOUNTAIN VIEW, Calif., February 14, 2014 – Today, residents throughout Santa Clara County will have the technology available to provide assistance to a person experiencing a sudden cardiac arrest (SCA) who may be in need of CPR. El Camino Hospital, the fire departments within Santa Clara County and the PulsePoint Foundation announced the availability of the revolutionary PulsePoint mobile phone application to all of Santa Clara County.

“Every day, we treat patients in our emergency rooms that have sudden cardiac arrest. We know that quick action to restore heart function is essential to full recovery,” said Tomi Ryba, president and chief executive officer of El Camino Hospital, “Two years ago, El Camino Hospital provided the funding needed for the non-profit PulsePoint Foundation to enable our fire departments and emergency response systems to make this technology available to our community. This is an important investment to bringing this life-saving technology to Santa Clara County.”

Integrated with the 911 system, the location-based mobile app notifies CPR-trained citizens, who are in the immediate vicinity, of the critical need for CPR nearby. The app also directs these citizen rescuers to the exact location of the closest publicly accessible Automated External Defibrillator (AED). This notification happens simultaneously with the dispatch of emergency service crews to alert bystander response while emergency services make their way to the scene.

“The close collaboration between El Camino Hospital, the fire departments within Santa Clara County, the PulsePoint Foundation and Workday, a tech company, is a great example of how public and private partnerships can benefit our entire community,” said Mike Wasserman, President of the Santa Clara County Board of Supervisors, representing District 1. “Congratulations to all who made today’s launch possible. It’s a point of pride that Santa Clara County is the first county nationwide to have 100% of its residents covered by this technology.”

“The Pulse Point app lets everyday folks make a life-saving difference in those first few minutes when emergency services are on the way,” said Joe Simitian, Santa Clara County Supervisor for District 5. “I’m really pleased this technology is now available throughout the County. Today we’re asking the residents of Santa Clara County to do two simple things – download the PulsePoint app to your cell phone, and learn or brush up on your CPR skills.”

“Today’s launch could not have been possible without the coordinated efforts of nine Fire Chiefs from across Santa Clara County to ensure that our systems would enable citizen responders – no matter where they are in the county –to come to the aid of someone in need,” said Chief Ken Kehmna, Santa Clara County Fire District. “With the aging of our county’s population we can expect that more people will experience sudden cardiac arrest, so we welcome innovative approaches like PulsePoint to improve our collective ability to save lives.”

Sudden cardiac arrest is a leading cause of death in the United States, accounting for an estimated 360,000 deaths each year or 1,000 deaths per day. Different than a heart attack, sudden cardiac arrest is caused when the heart’s electrical system malfunctions and the heart stops working properly. CPR or AED use helps restore the heart’s normal rhythm. However, from the onset of a SCA, for every minute that passes without a SCA victim receiving resuscitation, the chances of that person surviving decrease 10 percent. After 10 minutes, chances of survival are minimal. That is why effective bystander CPR provided immediately after sudden cardiac arrest can double or triple a victim’s chance of survival.

PulsePoint was developed by volunteer engineers at Workday, a Silicon Valley-based company that creates enterprise cloud applications. The idea came from Richard Price, the former chief of the San Ramon Valley Fire Department who wanted to bridge the gap between the critical minutes following SCA and the 13 million Americans who are CPR trained but don’t often know their skills are required. PulsePoint is being used in more than 525 communities across 17 states. It was launched in San Jose in 2012, where there are currently more than 15,000 devices that have downloaded the app.

The PulsePoint app is available for iPhone and Android and can be downloaded from the iTunes Store™ and Google Play™. For more information about the PulsePoint app and to link to CPR classes throughout the county, please visit: www.elcaminohospital.org/CPRHelpNow

About El Camino Hospital
El Camino Hospital is an acute-care, 443-bed, nonprofit and locally governed organization with campuses in Mountain View and Los Gatos, Calif. In addition to state-of-the-art emergency departments, key medical specialties include behavioral health, cancer care, genomic medicine, heart and vascular, neuroscience, orthopedic and spine, senior health, urology, and the only Women’s Hospital in Northern California. The hospital is recognized as a national leader in the use of health information technology and wireless communications, and has been awarded the Gold Seal of Approval from The Joint Commission as a Primary Stroke Center as well as back-to-back ANCC Magnet Recognitions for Nursing Care.

To learn more, visit our website, find us on Facebook, follow us on Twitter, or view our videos on YouTube. For a physician referral, visit our website or call the El Camino Health Line at 800-216-5556.

About the PulsePoint Foundation
PulsePoint is a 501(c)(3) non-profit foundation based in the San Francisco Bay Area. Its mission is to make it much easier for citizens who are trained in CPR to use their life-saving skills to do just that…save lives! Through the use of modern, location-aware mobile devices PulsePoint is building applications that work with local public safety agencies to improve communications with citizens and empower them to help reduce the millions of annual deaths from sudden cardiac arrest. Learn more at www.pulsepoint.org.

Full Story