January 26, 2014 | by

Smart phone app to help save lives

ABC News12SAGINAW COUNTY (WJRT) – When a heart attack strikes, seconds matter.

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death in the United States, topping cancer and strokes.

Two local organizations are doing everything they can to connect people with technology that saves lives.

The Pulse 3 Foundation and Mobile Medical Response are using a smart phone app. It’s called PulsePoint. It’s free and you can find it in the app store on your phone.

“It’s an amazing app,” said Lynn Schutter, Director of Communications at Mobile Medical Response.

When seconds matter, “You need to act immediately in instances of cardiac arrest,” Schutter said.

According to Schutter, Saginaw County averages one heart attack a day.

“Our response times are six and eight minutes, within the city of Saginaw,” Schutter said.

“If an ambulance gets to you in six minutes, which is a phenomenal response time, your chance of living is already down to 40 percent, so we want to get help to you as soon as we can,” said Diane Fong, CEO of Pulse 3 Foundation.

While emergency crews are on the way, they’ll use PulsePoint to save time and lives.

“An alert will go out when it’s in a public location,” Fong said.

“Similar to an amber alert,” Schutter said.

If someone is having a heart attack, 911 will dispatch an ambulance, and MMR will send an alert through the app to get the attention of people nearby who are trained in CPR. PulsePoint also lets them know where the nearest automated external defibrillator can be found.

“We are the only service provider to bring the Pulse app to the state of Michigan,” Schutter said.

Right now, the feature is only available in Saginaw, Isabella, Gratiot and Clare counties. More than 3,000 people have already signed up to get the alerts, and the search is on for more volunteers.

“What we want is people who are willing to step in to help,” Fong said.

“If we can get bystanders to step in and give that immediate help while we are on the way, we can really save a life,” Schutter said.

Read the full story by Candace Burns at ABC.

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December 23, 2013 | by

Local Fire Departments Develop New App

Moorhead ProfileHave you ever wanted to be a superhero?

Well, even though you won’t ever be able to fly, the Moorhead and Fargo Fire Departments have joined a mobile device app service called Pulsepoint that could give you superpowers.

The application’s motto is “Enabling Citizen Superheroes” and the Fire Department hopes it will do just that.

Do you know CPR?

Are you willing to save a life?

These are the main questions behind the app PulsePoint.

“A citizen running the application will receive a notification, if they sign up for alerts, when they are within one quarter mile of somebody recording a cardiac arrest incident in Fargo Moorhead. There might be somebody only a minute away that is trained in CPR and is able and willing to help,” said Moorhead Assistant Fire Chief Jeff Wallin.

More than 1,000 people die from cardiac arrest each day, and ¼ of those people don’t get CPR in time.

This smart phone application will notify people when someone in their immediate area is suffering sudden cardiac arrest so that if they know CPR they can get there before authorities do.

“They found that for every minute that CPR is withheld or delayed you lose about 10% of your chance of recovery, and within 10 minutes we typically have brain death starting to occur,” Wallin said.

Citizens feel this application will do great things for the community.

“I think it’s a good idea, I think that anytime you have that kind of help right there to save someone’s life it’s good,” off duty nurse Jennifer Kwasnkiewski said.

Read the full article by Jamie Elias at KVRR FOX.

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December 23, 2013 | by

Fargo, Moorhead unveil app to get quicker help for sudden cardiac arrest victims

Moorhead Fire Chief Richard DuysenA new local smartphone app may help save lives by turning more people into rescuers.

A new local smartphone app may help save lives by turning more people into rescuers.

The PulsePoint app is integrated with the Red River Regional Dispatch Center, which handles calls throughout the metro area. When a call comes in about a suspected cardiac arrest, the 911 communications center activates an alert to PulsePoint app users simultaneously with Fargo and Moorhead fire and police units and F-M Ambulance.

Using a smartphone’s geo-location services, the app alerts users trained in CPR who are within a quarter-mile of the victim, directing them via a live map to the person suffering cardiac arrest. It will also show the nearest automated external defibrillator, or AED.

Fire chiefs from both cities unveiled the app during a news conference at Fargo City Hall on Monday and said they expect the app to improve the communities’ survival rate for sudden cardiac arrest – a frequently fatal condition in which the heart suddenly and unexpectedly stops beating.

“When someone experiences cardiac arrest, time is critical,” said Fargo Fire Chief Steve Dirksen. “A victim may die within minutes unless they receive early CPR and have access to a defibrillator.”

Moorhead Assistant Fire Chief Jeff Wallin said the two cities are the first fire departments in North Dakota and Minnesota to implement PulsePoint.

“I would like to think we are at the front of a wave that is just sweeping across the country right now,” Wallin said.

Read the full article by Robin Huebner at INFORUM.

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December 23, 2013 | by

New medical app has potential to save lives

Fargo (ND) Press ConferenceFargo, ND (WDAY TV) – The difference between life and death could come down to a new Smartphone app.

Monday, Fargo and Moorhead fire departments announced the launch of Pulse Point.

It is an app that provides notifications for CPR and other emergencies in the immediate area of the person using the app.

F-M fire departments hope the app can save lives.

Jeff Wallin- Asst. Chief, Moorhead Fire Dept.: “It’s our hope that everybody in the community will download the application. Think about a friend, family worker, or coworker. If they suffer a problem right around the block; that instead of having somebody three to five minutes away, if you had somebody that was just one minute away around the corner… That could keep somebody alive until additional help can arrive can make a huge impact for everybody in the Fargo-Moorhead area.”

The app is up and running, so feel free to download it on your smart phone.

Watch the news clip from WDAY 6 (ABC) Fargo, ND.

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December 23, 2013 | by

Fargo-Moorhead Fire Departments Unveil Emergency App

Fargo FD AppA new smart phone application will enable people in the community to help out in emergency situations around the Fargo-Moorhead area. The fire departments in Fargo and Moorhead unveiled the app in a joint news conference Monday.

The app is called PulsePoint. Once you download the app, you then select your location and mark certain emergencies you’d like to be notified about. Users who are trained in cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) are notified if someone nearby is having a cardiac emergency and may require CPR. If you decide to allow push notifications, you can also choose to be alerted during fire alarms, motor vehicle crashes, or medical emergencies, just to name a few.

As long as the GPS on your smart phone is turned on, and you are within a quarter-mile of the emergency, you will receive a notification. When you get an alert, you also have the option to see how many automated external defibrillators (AED) are in the area and where they are located.

The fire departments say the quicker victims are able to get help in an emergency, the better. They say the app will give users CPR instructions and other directions similar to those that dispatchers at Red River Regional Dispatch would give over the phone if you were to call 911. The app follows guidelines recommended by the American Heart Association regarding hands-only CPR.

Although not everyone may feel comfortable helping in an emergency situation, emergency responders say any type of assistance before they arrive could make a huge difference in an emergency situation.

“With only one quarter of all cardiac arrests victims receiving CPR, PulsePoint increases the odds that CPR and defibrillation will be provided even before emergency crews arrive on scene. Improving the chances of survival after a cardiac arrest,” explains Fargo Fire Chief Steve Dirksen.

Read the full story at NBCNews.com

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December 7, 2013 | by

Need to Save a Life? There’s an App for That.

Three years ago, San Ramon Valley Fire Chief Richard Price was eating dinner when he heard ambulance sirens. Someone next door had suffered a cardiac arrest and was unconscious.

“That whole time, while that crew was making their way to the scene, I had an AED in my car. I could’ve started CPR,” says Price. This event made Price realize that the system in place to help people during a cardiac crisis is not good enough. So, he — like many health care innovators today — turned to technology to enhance our society’s ability to save lives.

Every year, around 383,000 sudden cardiac arrests occur in the U.S. and less than eight percent of people who suffer them outside of a hospital survive. That’s because the first few minutes after cardiac arrest are vital to survival. After a person’s heart stops beating, brain damage can occur in four to six minutes. By 10 minutes, there is almost no chance of survival.

Even in Price’s former fire district, which he said had many advantages, ambulance response times were seven minutes in the city, eight in the suburbs, and fifteen in rural areas. Quality CPR given immediately after cardiac arrest can double, even triple, the chance of survival but this can only happen if CPR-trained people nearby know that someone needs their help.

That is the exact problem that Price is working to remedy.

Rather than merely reflecting on his experience as an unfortunate inevitability, Price was resolved to find out what more he could do to prevent similar situations in the future. That is how he came up with PulsePoint, an app that notifies CPR-trained bystanders of nearby cardiac arrests.

Read the full post by Taylor Kubota at the Xerox Healthbiz Decoded blog.

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November 23, 2013 | by

Taking pulse of CPR

Clark County unveils smartphone app that can help save lives of cardiac arrest victims

Troy-Wayrynen_TheColumbian_11222013_300pxApproximately 360 to 370 people go into cardiac arrest annually in Clark County, and an average of 17 percent survive, Dr. Lynn Wittwer said Friday.

Wittwer, the county’s emergency medical services program director, said he was defining “survive” as patients who leave the hospital in good neurological condition.

While a 17 percent survival rate ranks higher than many places in the United States, Wittwer would like to increase the survival rate to 30 percent.

And a tool he believes will help was unveiled Friday at the Clark County Public Service Center: PulsePoint, a free smartphone app that alerts CPR-trained users to a cardiac arrest in public.

The Vancouver Fire Department has been working about two years to get the app activated here, ever since Chief Joe Molina heard about it in California. A $25,000 grant paid for the behind-the-scenes work that Clark Regional Emergency Services Agency had to do in order for the app to work countywide. When a call about a cardiac arrest goes to 911, users of PulsePoint who are within 400 yards of the call will be alerted.

Chief Nick Swinhart of the Camas-Washougal Fire Department demonstrated the app Friday.

Now that Vancouver police and sheriff’s patrol cars are equipped with automated external defibrillators, the PulsePoint app has the next greatest potential to increase survival rates for cardiac arrest victims, Swinhart said. Emergency responders are hoping residents who know CPR will download the app, greatly increasing the chance that if someone suffers cardiac arrest in public there will be someone able to respond within a few minutes.

After downloading the app, the user clicks “Clark County” from a list of agencies. Then, under settings, her or she selects “CPR” from call types.

The user can listen to emergency radio traffic if alerted to a nearby cardiac arrest call. A map will show the patient’s exact location.

Doug Smith-Lee, EMS manager for CRESA, reiterated the app only alerts people to calls made from nearby public locations.

Read the full article by Stephanie Rice at The Columbian. Photo by Roy Wayrynen.

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November 21, 2013 | by

Did you know your smartphone can help save a life?

Press conference at 9:00 am to announce PulsePoint coverage in Clark County, Washington

CRESAVancouver, Wash. – November 22, 2013 – Now your smartphone can help you save a life. A free smartphone app called PulsePoint is now available in Clark County, Washington. PulsePoint enables subscribers who are CPR-trained to be alerted to a cardiac arrest at the same time emergency responders are notified.

Registered users will be notified when a cardiac arrest has occurred in a public place within their vicinity. PulsePoint will give the citizen responder mapping directions, notify them of any automatic external defibrillators (AEDs) in at area and provide the radio traffic of the emergency responders.

Early CPR is the key if the victim is to survive. When a person goes into cardiac arrest, their heart, brain and other vital organs no longer receive oxygen. Researchers have found that without early CPR within the first 3 to 5 minutes, victims’ chances of survival are dramatically reduced.

The free PulsePoint app can be found in the Apple App store, or in Android Apps on Google Play. Within the app select Clark County, Washington – CRESA. You only need to be willing to do “Hands-Only” CPR. According to the American Heart Association, Hands-Only CPR has been shown to be as effective as conventional CPR in the first minutes of cardiac arrest.

Subscribers can also view active fire and emergency medical incidents and monitor emergency radio traffic.

Businesses, schools and other public sites with an AED are asked to visit CRESA website to see if their AED is listed in the PulsePoint database. Register your AED here.

Play a key role in cardiac arrest victim’s survival – Learn CPR and become a PulsePoint subscriber today.

Media Events and PSA
Media are invited to attend a press conference where the CPR alert for cardiac arrests will officially launch.

What: Press Conference to unveil the PulsePoint smartphone app.
When: Friday, November 22nd at 9:00 am.
Where: Clark County Public Service Center, Rm 679, 1300 Franklin, Vancouver WA.
Activities: CRESA’s PulsePoint PSA unveiled; cardiac arrest survivor speaks on the importance of citizen response and CPR; PulsePoint demonstration

About the PulsePoint Foundation
PulsePoint is a 501(c)(3) non-profit foundation based in the San Francisco Bay Area. Its mission is to make it much easier for citizens who are trained in CPR to use their life saving skills to do just that…save lives! Through the use of modern, location-aware mobile devices PulsePoint is building applications that work with local public safety agencies to improve communications with citizens and empower them to help reduce the millions of annual deaths from sudden cardiac arrest. Learn more at www.pulsepoint.org or join the conversation at www.facebook.com/PulsePoint and @PulsePoint.

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View the CRESA/PulsePoint Public Service Announcement

Contact
Doug Smith-Lee
Clark Regional Emergency Services Agency
doug.smith-lee@clark.wa.gov
(360) 737-1911 ext. 3949
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November 11, 2013 | by

Here’s how to save a life

Daniel and Charlette SandersAfter Scott Hansen’s heart gave out last year, strangers used its power to give him another chance at life. When Bill Pelow’s heart stopped in 2011, Daniel Velazquez became his lifeline because of it.

Charlette Sanders isn’t a widow today and her children have a father because she learned the lifesaving technique during an emergency conversation with 911 operator Amy Breitenbach.

Cardiopulmonary resuscitation, better known as CPR, the only known method of keeping someone alive until medically necessary treatment can be administered, saves tens of thousands of lives in heart-related crises annually in the United States alone.

But as wonderful as that is, it is also true that tens of thousands of other Americans die because CPR isn’t used. The American Heart Association reports that less than one-third of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest victims — there are about 400,000 each year — receive CPR from a bystander.

David Slattery, Las Vegas Fire and Rescue’s medical director, said studies show that Americans find intervening “very scary” because they’re not medically trained and that fear often paralyzes them.

Considering that cardiac arrest survival falls an estimated 7 percent to 10 percent for every minute without CPR and that it takes an average of four to six minutes across the country for rescue personnel to arrive, the low rate of bystander CPR plays a critical role on outcomes.

Less than 8 percent of people who suffer cardiac arrest outside the hospital survive.

Read the full post by Paul Harasim at the Las Vegas Review-Journal.

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