RFD Medic 5 at Mercy

July 1, 2014 | by

Rogers Fire Department App Asks Residents To Do CPR, Save Lives

Rogers Fire StationA new smartphone application that asks volunteers to help when someone nearby has a cardiac arrest could make the difference between life and death for some residents, said Tom Jenkins, Rogers fire chief.

“Over the course of the year, I think we will save a few more lives,” Jenkins said Friday.

On Tuesday, city aldermen approved spending about $45,000 to participate in an app by PulsePoint, a nonprofit organization that aims to provide a nationwide system that matches volunteers to people who need cardio-pulmonary resuscitation. The app will go live in Rogers within three months, Jenkins said.

Starting CPR immediately increases the chance of survival among cardiac arrest patients, said Richard Price, PulsePoint president and a former fire chief.

“We know bystanders can intervene and make a difference in people’s lives before firefighters arrive,” Price said.

During a heart attack, brain damage can start in about five minutes, and the survival rate drops to almost zero in 10 minutes, Price said. In Rogers, it takes an average of about 6 1/2 minutes for dispatchers to get the 911 call, notify firefighters, and for firefighters to suit up and drive to the location where a heart attack is happening, Jenkins said.

The cardiac arrest survival rate in Rogers was about 42 percent last year, he said.

Implementing the app is the second step to getting residents to participate in emergency care, Jenkins said. The Fire Department has pushed for residents to learn CPR for about three years, he said.

The strategy has worked, Jenkins said. The Rogers Fire Department has trained about 15,000 residents in CPR, and bystander participation is up.

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The Fire Department had about 100 bystanders help during emergencies last year when just two years ago that number was in the single digits, Jenkins said.

“Our community here in Rogers has really stepped up to learn CPR,” he said.

The PulsePoint Respond app is new, but participation is growing nationwide, Price said. The 3-year-old app is used in about 600 cities and communities nationwide and in 18 states. Another 200 cities are in the process of adding the app, he said.

Rogers will be the first to try the app in Arkansas, Price said. Jenkins said other cities may follow suit once they see how well the app works.

At A Glance

Bystander CPR

Effective bystander CPR provided immediately after sudden cardiac arrest can double or triple a victim’s chance of survival. In Rogers, the survival rate was 42 percent last year, compared to about 7 percent in 2010.

App Coverage

The PulsePoint Response app will cover Rogers and Little Flock and part of Benton County along Arkansas 12 and Arkansas 94 East. The app also acts as a registry for defibrillators and notifies volunteers where public defibrillators are located. For volunteers who register, the app also will relocate when they travel to other jurisdictions that use it. So, a Rogers traveler can be notified of a cardiac arrest while they are visiting Las Vegas, for example.

Survival Rate

Survival rates nationwide for sudden cardiac arrests are less than 8 percent. Only about a third of victims receive bystander CPR. Without oxygen-rich blood, permanent brain damage or death can occur in less than 8 minutes.

View the full story By Scarlet Simson at NWAonline.

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Bryan Hinds

June 29, 2014 | by

New Smartphone App Could Reduce Heart Attack Deaths

Rogers, AR — A new smartphone app is coming to Rogers, and it has the potential to help save lives. “PulsePoint” is a free app that notifies CPR certified people of a cardiac emergency nearby. When a 911 call is placed, the closest person in a public location that is certified to perform CPR will be alerted on their phone so they can respond before emergency crews arrive. The City of Rogers has been working to reduce the number of cardiac arrest deaths in the area for several years. They also want to increase the number of bystanders performing CPR.

Bryan Hinds of Rogers’ Fire Department says, “we were wanting to up that [CPR responses] percentage because we think we can significantly impact the number of survivals from cardiac arrest.”

View the full story on the NWA Homepage.

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NationSwell Logo

June 18, 2014 | by

An App That Turns Everyday Bystanders Into Everyday Heroes

PulsePoint saves lives by improving the way we respond to those in distress.

Justin Sullivan/Getty ImagesWhen an airplane passenger is in physical distress, the flight attendant calls through the speakers asking if medical professionals are on board. It’s a simple action that can make a huge difference. What if we could mimic this same outreach, 10,000 feet below, everyday on the ground?

That’s exactly what the smart phone app PulsePoint (for download here) makes possible, according to Emergency Management. Using the gadgets we all carry every day, municipalities that use the free mobile service are able to send out alerts to CPR-certified citizens who are nearby someone in need. In many cases, there are just a few minutes between life and death, so every second counts. By quickening response times, this app can help save lives — before an ambulance is even in sight.

PulsePoint doesn’t replace dispatched responders, but as fast as ambulances and emergency medical technicians try to arrive, they’re often not quick enough. Once 9-1-1 is dialed and the available crew is actually with the patient, it can be too late – making those that can arrive quicker a vital resource.

San Jose became the first area city to use PulsePoint in 2012 — the app’s founder and CEO, Richard Price, is from the area, having worked as an ex-fire chief of the San Ramon Valley Fire Protection District. Since then, it’s caught on thanks to support from a local hospital and the results it provides. A local hospital is also planning a public registry of automated defibrillators through a new, related app, PulsePoint AED.

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With decreasing local budgets for emergency response, increasing populations and traffic congestion, the demand for innovations like PulsePoint is greater than ever. By alerting off-duty first responders, medical professionals, and other CPR certified individuals of a nearby need, PulsePoint turns them into valuable lifesavers, all with the tap of a phone, making the app early — and effective — when time means everything.

View the full story by Harrison Potter at NationSwell.

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SJ Mercury News Logo

June 12, 2014 | by

PulsePoint app turns bystanders into first responders

When it comes to helping a victim of cardiac arrest, it’s all about speed. PulsePoint, a life-saving mobile app, may not necessarily increase the speed at which first responders arrive, but it adds more legs to the race.

Santa Clara County agencies began using the PulsePoint app earlier this year with the goal of mobilizing CPR-trained residents and bystanders into becoming first responders.

The free app uses location-based technology to alert CPR-trained citizens if someone in their immediate area is experiencing sudden cardiac arrest. The alerted citizen can then choose to spring into action, find the victim and begin resuscitation until official emergency responders arrive.

“I can do an important job that the fire department can not do,” says PulsePoint Foundation president and app inventor Richard Price, adding that first responders “can’t get there in two minutes. I can sustain life until they arrive.”

Price, the former chief of the San Ramon Valley Fire Protection District, conceived the idea in 2009 after there was a cardiac arrest incident near him that he was unaware of and could not respond to. The idea came just as the smart phone revolution was gaining serious momentum.

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“This idea to push a message to a phone is fairly new, and the ability for the phone to know where it’s at is still fairly new,” Price says.

Price adds that there are associated time costs that people forget about between the initial 911 call and paramedics arriving to assist. Call dispatchers have to take information, firefighters and paramedics need to scramble to their vehicles, and responders still need to get to the precise location of the victim.

All of this needs to happen in nine minutes, after which Price says there is a 92 percent chance of death.

“In these first few minutes, you can really make a difference,” Price says. “You just think about these minutes as a [baseball] score, and you don’t want to start in a deep hole. You don’t win many games when it’s 9-0 in the first inning.”

While the app is available to all CPR-trained individuals, the real target audience is off-duty firefighters, nurses and other life-saving professionals. However, Price adds that all CPR-trained individuals are valuable, and simply being aware of the app can stimulate awareness of CPR and trigger more discussion, especially for younger more tech-savvy residents.

View the full story by Matt Wilson at San Jose Mercury News.

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Drew in Wheelchair

June 4, 2014 | by

Heart Attack Rescue? There’s an App for That

A new smartphone app that aims to turn ordinary bystanders into heart attack heroes did just that last month, saving the life of a 57-year-old truck driver from Portland, Oregon, who had collapsed outside a gym.

Drew Basse is the first high-profile rescue attributed to PulsePoint, a free mobile app that alerts users when someone is in cardiac arrest nearby.

“Without people like Scott Brawner, I wouldn’t have had a second chance,” said Basse, referring to the off-duty local firefighter who answered the PulsePoint ping.

Basse, a father of two and grandfather to four, is recovering in a Portland rehabilitation center after the May 9 incident that Brawner said was the highlight of his 34-year career.

“I can’t believe that it worked,” said Brawner, 52, of Tualatin, Oregon. “It was just awesome. It still gives me chills.”

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Created on a shoestring budget by Richard Price, a former San Ramon, California, fire chief who didn’t want to miss an emergency call, PulsePoint has gained slow traction since 2009, rolling out to 911 dispatch centers that now cover some 600 U.S. cities.

“We’ve found that people are very willing to put their hand up and say, ‘I’ll help,’” said Price. More than 140,000 people have signed up for PulsePoint so far and more than 7,300 have responded to nearly 2,300 alerts.

Every year in the U.S. there are about 360,000 out-of-hospital cardiac arrests, or about 1,000 a day. Experts who research the problem say PulsePoint may be one way to boost the ranks of those who can perform bystander CPR, which doubles or triples the chances of surviving.

“It’s a great use of technology to enlist the aid of people who are willing and able to help save lives from cardiac arrest,” said Dr. Michael Sayre, an emergency medicine doctor with the University of Washington in Seattle and an leader in resuscitation medicine.

In Basse’s case, he was saved by Brawner, who happened to be working out at the same gym. Brawner’s fire district signed up for PulsePoint about a year ago.

But even he wasn’t expecting the alert that showed up on his phone as he walked on the treadmill, telling him that someone needed CPR, or cardiopulmonary resuscitation, right away. He saw a map, an icon of where he was, an icon showing the closet AED or automated external defibrillator — and an icon showing a victim. He quickly ran down two flights of stairs.

“I saw a security guard standing in the parking structure and it just didn’t look right to me,” Brawner said. “That’s where Drew Basse was. He was literally sitting in his car, unconscious, not breathing, no pulse.”

In fact, Brawner thought he looked like a “fresh code,” firefighter slang for someone who is already dead.

Brawner pulled Basse out of his car and started performing CPR. Within minutes, emergency crews arrived and took over, but the time that Brawner kept Basse’s blood pumping was crucial, doctors said.

That’s just what PulsePoint founder Price, 52, had in mind. He was a veteran of 32 years as a firefighter and fire chief, focused on improving bystander CPR and rapid response.

He was at lunch one day when he heard sirens and saw a fire truck pull right up to the business next door. “I wasn’t even aware of it,” he said. “I was actually in uniform. I had an AED in my car. We just weren’t plugged into those types of calls.”

Using technical skill gleaned from years of operating dispatch centers, Price worked with engineering interns from Northern Kentucky University to develop the app. Now, it’s updated and maintained by the firm Workday, which provides technical services for free.

View the full story by JoNel Aleccia at NBC News.

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Spokane County PulsePoint Launch

April 13, 2014 | by

PulsePoint Increases Community Awareness of AEDs

SVFD ReenactmentYour chances of surviving a heart attack at Spokane Valley City Hall soon will improve.

After learning about a new effort that uses smartphones to alert CPR-trained volunteers to life-threatening emergencies nearby, city leaders decided to purchase a heart-jolting automated external defibrillator that paramedics say can dramatically improve chances of surviving sudden cardiac arrest.

The easy-to-use medical device, which cost about $1,250, is set to arrive in the next couple of weeks.

“I think we were kind of surprised when we realized there wasn’t one here,” said Deputy Mayor Arne Woodard.

The decision came after the City Council was told last month that Spokane-area fire departments are mapping the locations of AEDs in publicly accessible sites countywide.

The electronic map is part of a smartphone app called PulsePoint that’s linked to the county’s 911 system and alerts trained volunteers to emergencies at the same time that paramedics are being dispatched. The app guides volunteers to the location of the emergency and also shows whether any AEDs are nearby.

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It’s available for free in the Apple App Store or Android Apps on Google Play. Volunteers must register.

Once the city’s new AED arrives, City Hall will be added to the PulsePoint map.

So far, authorities have mapped 102 publicly accessible AEDs in Spokane Valley and they expect that number to climb rapidly over the next year because firefighters now will be asking business owners about the availability of the devices while doing annual site checks, said Fire Chief Bryan Collins.

The Spokane Fire Department and several rural fire protection districts also are mapping AED locations.

The app was developed in northern California where Collins worked before being hired in Spokane Valley.

On average, at least two people a day go into sudden cardiac arrest across Spokane County, said Collins, and chances of survival improve the quicker CPR or AED treatment is initiated.

The PulsePoint app uses smartphone GPS technology to determine whether any CPR volunteers are near the scene of an emergency and alerts them that help is needed. The goal is to get at least hands-only CPR initiated within the first three to five minutes of sudden cardiac arrest.

See the original article on The Spokesman-Review.

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Zetron Booth

March 11, 2014 | by

Zetron Joins with PulsePoint in Saving Lives

Zetron hosts PulsePoint at this year’s IWCE, demonstrating the MAX Call-Taking system with the PulsePoint lifesaving CPR mobile app. Agencies looking to implement PulsePoint within their community can use the MAX Call-Taking console to call for immediate CPR assistance from the rapidly-growing PulsePoint mobile network of CPR-trained volunteers across the US. PulsePoint will be hosted in Zetron’s booth (#5001) at IWCE in Las Vegas, March 24-28, 2014.

Zetron LogoRedmond, WA, U.S.A., March 10, 2014Zetron, a leading provider of mission-critical communications solutions worldwide, announced that its MAX Call-Taking system can be used directly with the PulsePoint CPR incident-notification network. With MAX, a CAD system is not required for PulsePoint integration, making this an affordable solution for public-safety agencies on a tight budget.

PulsePoint offers a free-to-download mobile application that enables CPR-trained citizen volunteers to provide lifesaving assistance to victims of Sudden Cardiac Arrest, in any public place and at any time it is needed. When an Emergency Services agency implements the PulsePoint notification system within their jurisdiction, they can provide real time CPR alerts to volunteers by routing the medical emergency information through the PulsePoint network.

PulsePoint will be hosted in the Zetron booth #5001 at the International Wireless Communications Expo (IWCE) in Las Vegas, March 24-28, 2014.

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How does PulsePoint CPR notification work?

  • A person suffers Sudden Cardiac Arrest; a bystander calls 9-1-1.
  • The 9-1-1 call center operator takes the emergency call and simply selects a medical-emergency event on their MAX Call-Taking system. MAX then transmits this information to PulsePoint. MAX is unique in that a CAD system is not required for successful integration with PulsePoint.
  • The PulsePoint server consults its geospatial database of CPR-trained volunteer citizen responders. Those who are currently nearby receive a “CPR Needed” alert on their mobile device, announcing the location of the victim and any AEDs (automated external defibrillators) in the vicinity.
  • An alerted volunteer rushes to the scene and initiates CPR in the precious minutes before the EMS crew arrives, greatly improving the victim’s chances of survival.

“We’re pleased to host PulsePoint in our booth at IWCE and provide them access to potential customers and partners”, remarked Zetron’s vice president of product management, Kathy Broadwell. “PulsePoint’s lifesaving application is a benefit to the communities that have deployed it. It’s Zetron’s desire to make this application even more affordable to all communities, so we have designed a way to access the feature through our MAX Call-Taking system.”

About Zetron
For over 30 years, Zetron has been providing mission-critical communications solutions to customers in public safety, transportation, utilities, manufacturing, healthcare and business. With offices in the U.S.A., U.K., Australia and numerous field locations, Zetron supports a worldwide network of resellers, system integrators and distributors. This gives Zetron a global reach as well as a local presence in the regions it serves. Zetron is a wholly owned subsidiary of JVC Kenwood Corporation. For more information, visit: www.zetron.com.

About the PulsePoint Foundation
PulsePoint is a 501(c)(3) non-profit foundation based in the San Francisco Bay Area. Its mission is to make it much easier for citizens who are trained in CPR to use their lifesaving skills to do just that…save lives! Through the use of modern, location-aware mobile devices PulsePoint is building applications that work with local public safety agencies to improve communications with citizens and empower them to help reduce the millions of annual deaths from sudden cardiac arrest. Learn more at www.pulsepoint.org or join the conversation at www.facebook.com/PulsePoint and @PulsePoint.

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West Tennessee Healthcare

February 26, 2014 | by

New App in West Tennessee Will Save Lives

WEST JACKSON– Seconds can separate life and death. First responders say they’re excited about the launch of a news app that will help them save lives.

Watch the ABC 7 Story.

Once downloaded, it notifies you if you’re within a mile of a CPR event in Madison, Benton, and Chester counties.

The app is called ‘PulsePoint’. It’s a free download in the Apple App Store and Google Play. Shannon Seaton with Emergency Management Services says it’s already had 400 downloads since its launch a few weeks ago.

The department is spreading the word and trying to get anyone connected who is certified in CPR.

If someone has a heart attack in your neighborhood, once the 9-1-1 operator has been dialed, it will go into the system and the alert will come through on your phone.

Medical experts say the first four to six minutes after a heart attack are crucial.

“It’s shown that after just a few minutes of oxygen to the brain, brain death can occur, so in that time it takes for EMS to get there, if CPR isn’t started, the chance of survival gets less and less,” Emily Garner with West Tennessee Heart and Vascular Center said.

She hopes that anyone that is CPR certified will download the app, and be a part of a community that saves lives.

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February 15, 2014 | by

App to help heart attack victims

PulsePoint turns anyone into a first responder if there’s a cardiac arrest nearby

Sudden cardiac arrest? There’s an app for that.

Joe Simitian, Santa Clara County Supervisor for District 5 and Mike Wasserman, President of the Santa Clara County Board of Supervisors, representing District 1

Santa Clara County Supervisors Joe Simitian and Mike Wasserman

Health and safety officials from Mountain View and around the county are endorsing the local launch of the PulsePoint system, a mobile app that alerts users when someone nearby is having a heart attack, giving good Samaritans the chance to lend a potentially life-saving hand until emergency responders arrive.

PulsePoint functions as a direct link between individuals and local emergency dispatchers. Starting Feb. 14, the app’s local launch date, 911 dispatch centers in Santa Clara County will have the ability to send out a location-based alert to PulsePoint users in the vicinity of a reported heart attack, according to a press release from El Camino Hospital.

“It’s an Amber Alert for cardiac arrest victims,” said Richard Price, president of the PulsePoint Foundation and the former chief of the San Ramon Valley Fire Protection District.

The application comes with built-in guides that train people in basic “hands-only” cardio-pulmonary resuscitation (CPR) which, Price said, can be learned in minutes and has the potential to make the difference between life and death.

“This is really all about response times,” Price said, explaining that when it comes to sudden cardiac arrest, every minute counts. When someone’s heart stops beating, brain damage can set in after about six minutes and without intervention in the first 10 minutes, the likelihood of death is nearly certain. Very often, he said, “the emergency response crews can’t get there in time”

Basic, hands-only CPR rapid, two-inch-deep chest compressions can help prevent brain damage and keep a person alive until EMTs or paramedics arrive.

“Bystander CPR use is critical,” Price said.

According to the American Heart Association, about 1,000 people have an out-of-hospital cardiac arrest in the U.S. every day, but only 32 percent of cardiac arrest victims receive CPR from a bystander. Given statistics like those, Price said he figures that the more people that adopt the PulsePoint app, the better. “We’re pretty much putting a radio in everybody’s hand, so we can dispatch people,” he said.

Jaime Garrett, public information officer for the Mountain View Fire Department, said the department is looking forward to the PulsePoint launch.

“It really increases our community members’ chances of survival should a cardiac arrest or a cardiac incident happen in a public place,” Garrett said. “With any cardiac incident, the sooner CPR is initiated, the better the chances of survival. It gives our residents the tools necessary to be able to respond in a timely manner.”

Garrett, like Price, recommended that everyone with an Android, or iOS device download the app. PulsePoint can be found in the Apple App Store and the Android marketplace on the Google Play site.

Anyone with the PulsePoint app on a mobile device will get a notification of cardiac events occurring within a quarter mile of their location at the time the alert is issued. The app’s users will also be given directions from their location to the site of the reported victim, as well as information on any nearby automated external defibrillators a device that uses electricity to restart the heart of victims of cardiac arrest.

Price, who developed the app in coordination with cloud application maker Workday, said the idea first came to him when he was on a lunch break during his tenure as chief of San Ramon Valley Fire.

He was in uniform, eating his lunch, when an ambulance pulled up outside the restaurant. Someone was having a heart attack in the building next door and he had no idea it was happening.

“It was a pretty shocking experience,” Price recalls especially considering the fact that he could have helped if he only had known. “That was the genesis of the app.”

View the entire news story by Nick Veronin at the Mountain View Voice.

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February 15, 2014 | by

Dr. Chad Rammohan, Medical Director of the Chest Pain Center & Cardiac Cath Lab at El Camino Hospital, encourages CPR skills and PulsePoint use

Watch Dr. Chad Rammohan, Medical Director of the Chest Pain Center & Cardiac Cath Lab at El Camino Hospital in this new PulsePoint PSA introduction.

Trouble viewing video? Try this link to the video file.

Dr. Chad Rammohan Chad Rammohan, M.D., FACC
Interventional Cardiology
Palo Alto Medical Foundation
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