February 14, 2014 | by

El Camino Hospital And Fire Departments Of Santa Clara County Launch Free CPR “Citizen Responder” Mobile Phone App

Citizen CPR, Provided Immediately After Sudden Cardiac Arrest,
Can Double or Triple a Person’s Chance of Survival

PulsePoint Alerts CPR-Trained Bystanders That Someone Nearby May Require CPR

PulsePoint/ECH Special Event Signage

PulsePoint Press Conference

MOUNTAIN VIEW, Calif., February 14, 2014 – Today, residents throughout Santa Clara County will have the technology available to provide assistance to a person experiencing a sudden cardiac arrest (SCA) who may be in need of CPR. El Camino Hospital, the fire departments within Santa Clara County and the PulsePoint Foundation announced the availability of the revolutionary PulsePoint mobile phone application to all of Santa Clara County.

“Every day, we treat patients in our emergency rooms that have sudden cardiac arrest. We know that quick action to restore heart function is essential to full recovery,” said Tomi Ryba, president and chief executive officer of El Camino Hospital, “Two years ago, El Camino Hospital provided the funding needed for the non-profit PulsePoint Foundation to enable our fire departments and emergency response systems to make this technology available to our community. This is an important investment to bringing this life-saving technology to Santa Clara County.”

Integrated with the 911 system, the location-based mobile app notifies CPR-trained citizens, who are in the immediate vicinity, of the critical need for CPR nearby. The app also directs these citizen rescuers to the exact location of the closest publicly accessible Automated External Defibrillator (AED). This notification happens simultaneously with the dispatch of emergency service crews to alert bystander response while emergency services make their way to the scene.

“The close collaboration between El Camino Hospital, the fire departments within Santa Clara County, the PulsePoint Foundation and Workday, a tech company, is a great example of how public and private partnerships can benefit our entire community,” said Mike Wasserman, President of the Santa Clara County Board of Supervisors, representing District 1. “Congratulations to all who made today’s launch possible. It’s a point of pride that Santa Clara County is the first county nationwide to have 100% of its residents covered by this technology.”

“The Pulse Point app lets everyday folks make a life-saving difference in those first few minutes when emergency services are on the way,” said Joe Simitian, Santa Clara County Supervisor for District 5. “I’m really pleased this technology is now available throughout the County. Today we’re asking the residents of Santa Clara County to do two simple things – download the PulsePoint app to your cell phone, and learn or brush up on your CPR skills.”

“Today’s launch could not have been possible without the coordinated efforts of nine Fire Chiefs from across Santa Clara County to ensure that our systems would enable citizen responders – no matter where they are in the county –to come to the aid of someone in need,” said Chief Ken Kehmna, Santa Clara County Fire District. “With the aging of our county’s population we can expect that more people will experience sudden cardiac arrest, so we welcome innovative approaches like PulsePoint to improve our collective ability to save lives.”

Sudden cardiac arrest is a leading cause of death in the United States, accounting for an estimated 360,000 deaths each year or 1,000 deaths per day. Different than a heart attack, sudden cardiac arrest is caused when the heart’s electrical system malfunctions and the heart stops working properly. CPR or AED use helps restore the heart’s normal rhythm. However, from the onset of a SCA, for every minute that passes without a SCA victim receiving resuscitation, the chances of that person surviving decrease 10 percent. After 10 minutes, chances of survival are minimal. That is why effective bystander CPR provided immediately after sudden cardiac arrest can double or triple a victim’s chance of survival.

PulsePoint was developed by volunteer engineers at Workday, a Silicon Valley-based company that creates enterprise cloud applications. The idea came from Richard Price, the former chief of the San Ramon Valley Fire Department who wanted to bridge the gap between the critical minutes following SCA and the 13 million Americans who are CPR trained but don’t often know their skills are required. PulsePoint is being used in more than 525 communities across 17 states. It was launched in San Jose in 2012, where there are currently more than 15,000 devices that have downloaded the app.

The PulsePoint app is available for iPhone and Android and can be downloaded from the iTunes Store™ and Google Play™. For more information about the PulsePoint app and to link to CPR classes throughout the county, please visit: www.elcaminohospital.org/CPRHelpNow

About El Camino Hospital
El Camino Hospital is an acute-care, 443-bed, nonprofit and locally governed organization with campuses in Mountain View and Los Gatos, Calif. In addition to state-of-the-art emergency departments, key medical specialties include behavioral health, cancer care, genomic medicine, heart and vascular, neuroscience, orthopedic and spine, senior health, urology, and the only Women’s Hospital in Northern California. The hospital is recognized as a national leader in the use of health information technology and wireless communications, and has been awarded the Gold Seal of Approval from The Joint Commission as a Primary Stroke Center as well as back-to-back ANCC Magnet Recognitions for Nursing Care.

To learn more, visit our website, find us on Facebook, follow us on Twitter, or view our videos on YouTube. For a physician referral, visit our website or call the El Camino Health Line at 800-216-5556.

About the PulsePoint Foundation
PulsePoint is a 501(c)(3) non-profit foundation based in the San Francisco Bay Area. Its mission is to make it much easier for citizens who are trained in CPR to use their life-saving skills to do just that…save lives! Through the use of modern, location-aware mobile devices PulsePoint is building applications that work with local public safety agencies to improve communications with citizens and empower them to help reduce the millions of annual deaths from sudden cardiac arrest. Learn more at www.pulsepoint.org.

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February 10, 2014 | by

Life-Saving App Promoted In Aberdeen


Video not displaying properly?

ABERDEEN, SD – Paramedics in Aberdeen are asking the public to help them save lives using a smart phone app.

The dispatch center has technology that’ll alert people who know CPR if someone nearby needs it. The technology sends alerts through the PulsePoint App and has been online less than a week.

When paramedics respond to an emergency call, they’re often up against time. That’s why JR Huebner is happy the PulsePoint App is now an option for people in Aberdeen.

“The goal for us is to get people there as soon as possible, starting CPR with the hope that we can save more lives,” Huebner said.

People who know CPR and download the app on their smart phones can ask for alerts when someone near them in a public place needs CPR.

When a 911 call comes in, technology at the dispatch center will track its location. Those within a quarter mile will get an alert, Huebner said.

“I think it’d be great. Depending on how severe the attack or incident might be, a couple of minutes makes a huge difference,” Gaylan Lang said.

Even though he’s an avid runner, Lang still needed a heart stint a few years ago. So he knows anyone could require CPR one day, even if they lead a healthy lifestyle. That’s why he’s hopeful the app will become popular with many people certified in CPR.

Huebner says an ambulance response time in town with Aberdeen Fire and Rescue is three to five minutes. When someone’s in cardiac arrest, he says, survival chances decrease ten percent for every minute that passes.

“This just basically enhances our circle of responders that can get to the scene quicker,” Huebner said.

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February 10, 2014 | by

Cleveland Clinic, City Of Cleveland and Westshore Fire Departments Launch Smartphone App to Help Improve Community Response to Sudden Cardiac Arrest

PulsePoint Connects CPR-Trained Citizens to Cardiac Emergencies

Monday, February 10, 2014, Cleveland: Cleveland Clinic in conjunction with the City of Cleveland and five WestShore fire departments has launched the PulsePoint CPR/AED smartphone app to help improve sudden cardiac arrest (SCA) survival rates.

The PulsePoint app helps improve community response to SCA victims by notifying and enabling citizen bystanders that lifesaving cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) is needed and where someone can access a nearby automated external defibrillator (AED).

“Cleveland Clinic’s heart program continues to rank as the best in the nation and we saw it as a natural fit to bring the PulsePoint tool to Northeast Ohio,” said Brad Borden, M.D., Chair of Cleveland Clinic’s Emergency Services Institute. “We hope that local citizens will join us in our fight to combat the No. 1 cause of death in the United States and encourage everyone that is trained in CPR to download and use the application.”

The PulsePoint software has been integrated with the computer aided dispatch systems in the cities of Cleveland, Bay Village, Westlake, Rocky River, Fairview Park and North Ridgeville. Upon receiving a call regarding a suspected sudden cardiac arrest victim, the 911/emergency communication center activates an alert to PulsePoint app users simultaneously with the dispatch of local emergency medical services (EMS). Using a smart phone’s geolocation service, the app directs citizen responders within close proximity, to the victim’s location and the nearest public access AED. The alert will only notify app users when an emergency is taking place in a public setting.

“This is another example of the strong partnership the City of Cleveland has with Cleveland Clinic that helps improve quality of life for citizens and visitors of this community,” said Cleveland EMS Commissioner Nicole Carlton. “PulsePoint will provide the general public a unique opportunity to assist in the reduction of cardiac arrest mortality and partner with our first responders in a meaningful way. The app also provides detailed locations of all of the automated external defibrillators installed and maintained by the Division of EMS. Rapid application of defibrillation and CPR can improve survival rates to sudden cardiac arrest exponentially.”

Sudden cardiac arrest is a leading cause of death in the United States, accounting for an estimated 325,000 deaths each year or 1,000 deaths per day. When SCA occurs, the heart stops beating in an effective, organized manner. As a result, blood is no longer pumped throughout the body. The person suddenly passes out and appears lifeless, except for abnormal gasping which may last several minutes. Effective bystander CPR provided immediately after sudden cardiac arrest can double or triple a victim’s chance of survival. Failure to act and doing nothing in a cardiac emergency can lead to unnecessary deaths.

“The seconds and minutes following a sudden cardiac arrest are critical to saving a person’s life,” said Bay Village Fire Chief Christopher Lyons. “The PulsePoint app will allow citizens to partner with their local fire departments in providing immediate assistance to those in such need. We very much appreciate that the Cleveland Clinic has partnered with the WestShore fire departments to bring this technology and its potential lifesaving assistance to the communities we serve. We hope that everyone with CPR training will download this app immediately. We also hope that people will consider signing up for a CPR class if they are not yet trained.”

The free PulsePoint app is available to the public for Apple iOS and Google Android devices from the Apple App Store and Google Play. After downloading, select “Cleveland EMS” and “WestShore Fire Departments” as the agencies to follow. There is also a “CPR How-To” section on the app that offers instructions on performing CPR for those not certified.

“We are very excited to partner with Cleveland Clinic and bring PulsePoint to the citizens of Cleveland,” said Richard Price, President of the PulsePoint Foundation. “This allows us to expand our reach in offering the lifesaving capabilities of the app and help improve cardiac arrest survival rates throughout the region.”

About Cleveland Clinic
Cleveland Clinic is a nonprofit multispecialty academic medical center that integrates clinical and hospital care with research and education. Located in Cleveland, Ohio, it was founded in 1921 by four renowned physicians with a vision of providing outstanding patient care based upon the principles of cooperation, compassion and innovation. Cleveland Clinic has pioneered many medical breakthroughs, including coronary artery bypass surgery and the first face transplant in the United States. U.S.News & World Report consistently names Cleveland Clinic as one of the nation’s best hospitals in its annual “America’s Best Hospitals” survey. More than 3,000 full-time salaried physicians and researchers and 11,000 nurses represent 120 medical specialties and subspecialties. The Cleveland Clinic health system includes a main campus near downtown Cleveland, eight community hospitals, more than 75 Northern Ohio outpatient locations, including 16 full-service Family Health Centers, Cleveland Clinic Florida, the Lou Ruvo Center for Brain Health in Las Vegas, Cleveland Clinic Canada, and, currently under construction, Cleveland Clinic Abu Dhabi. In 2012, there were 5.1 million outpatient visits throughout the Cleveland Clinic health system and 157,000 hospital admissions. Patients came for treatment from every state and from more than 130 countries. Visit us at www.clevelandclinic.org. Follow us at www.twitter.com/ClevelandClinic.

About the PulsePoint Foundation
PulsePoint is a 501(c)(3) non-profit foundation based in the San Francisco Bay Area. Its mission is to make it much easier for citizens who are trained in CPR to use their life-saving skills to do just that…save lives! Through the use of modern, location-aware mobile devices PulsePoint is building applications that work with local public safety agencies to improve communications with citizens and empower them to help reduce the millions of annual deaths from sudden cardiac arrest. Learn more at www.pulsepoint.org.

Editor’s Note: Cleveland Clinic News Service is available to provide broadcast-quality interviews and B-roll upon request.

Contact
Jenny Popis
Cleveland Clinic, Corporate Communications
popisj@ccf.org
216.444.8853

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January 26, 2014 | by

Smart phone app to help save lives

ABC News12SAGINAW COUNTY (WJRT) – When a heart attack strikes, seconds matter.

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death in the United States, topping cancer and strokes.

Two local organizations are doing everything they can to connect people with technology that saves lives.

The Pulse 3 Foundation and Mobile Medical Response are using a smart phone app. It’s called PulsePoint. It’s free and you can find it in the app store on your phone.

“It’s an amazing app,” said Lynn Schutter, Director of Communications at Mobile Medical Response.

When seconds matter, “You need to act immediately in instances of cardiac arrest,” Schutter said.

According to Schutter, Saginaw County averages one heart attack a day.

“Our response times are six and eight minutes, within the city of Saginaw,” Schutter said.

“If an ambulance gets to you in six minutes, which is a phenomenal response time, your chance of living is already down to 40 percent, so we want to get help to you as soon as we can,” said Diane Fong, CEO of Pulse 3 Foundation.

While emergency crews are on the way, they’ll use PulsePoint to save time and lives.

“An alert will go out when it’s in a public location,” Fong said.

“Similar to an amber alert,” Schutter said.

If someone is having a heart attack, 911 will dispatch an ambulance, and MMR will send an alert through the app to get the attention of people nearby who are trained in CPR. PulsePoint also lets them know where the nearest automated external defibrillator can be found.

“We are the only service provider to bring the Pulse app to the state of Michigan,” Schutter said.

Right now, the feature is only available in Saginaw, Isabella, Gratiot and Clare counties. More than 3,000 people have already signed up to get the alerts, and the search is on for more volunteers.

“What we want is people who are willing to step in to help,” Fong said.

“If we can get bystanders to step in and give that immediate help while we are on the way, we can really save a life,” Schutter said.

Read the full story by Candace Burns at ABC.

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January 25, 2014 | by

PulsePoint App Helps EMS Save Cardiac Arrest Lives

This week on the show, I thought I would review the PulsePoint app from the PulsePoint Foundation at PulsePoint.org. I’ve interviewed Richard Price from PulsePoint a few times on the MedicCast and featured him last year as an EMS 10 Innovator on the MedicCast TV weekly commentary but I’ve never actually reviewed the app itself.

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App Notifies Bystander CPR Providers

For those of you who don’t know what it is, the PulsePoint app is a mobile app that connects bystander CPR trained individuals to any nearby reported cardiac arrests in a given jurisdiction. It works like this. First a jurisdiction has to sign up to integrate their computer dispatch system with the PulsePoint system.

Then, when a cardiac arrest is reported, not only are EMS, Fire and police crews dispatched, bystanders who have installed the app in the area are also alerted when they’re within about a 1/4 mile of the GPS location reported by the 911 call. It gives them walking directions to the location of the cardiac arrest patient and nearby AEDs.

Early Compressions Key to Saving Life

The goal is to get bystander compressions started as soon as possible, before EMS arrives on the scene, giving the patient the best chance of survival. This system has already saved countless lives and is installed in hundreds of jurisdictions worldwide.

Read the full post and learn more about Jamie Davis at The MedicCast.

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January 16, 2014 | by

Lifesaving CPR – there’s an app for that

Bystander CPRThe elderly suburban homeowner had completed several trips up and down an extension ladder while removing debris from the gutters of his house and had driven to a nearby hardware store to buy some needed items. As he entered the store, a sudden pain in his chest caused him to stagger a few steps before he slumped to the floor.

An employee noticed what happened and, seeing that the man didn’t move after collapsing, shouted to the store manager to call 911.

Within seconds, the alarm sounded at the nearest station where firefighter-paramedics were on duty and the crew scrambled to their emergency vehicles to respond. However, because the station was nearly three miles away, it would be several minutes before they would arrive.

But when the alarm sounded at the station, details of the apparent heart attack and where it had occurred triggered a special program linked to a smartphone carried by a businessman who had stopped to get a cup of coffee at a shop only a few yards from the hardware store.

The app on his smart phone told him where the apparent heart attack victim was and that the hardware store had an automated external defibrillator near its service desk.

Trained in CPR and how to use an AED, he rushed to the hardware store and treated the victim until paramedics arrived and took over.

Read the full article by Jim Erickson at Newsmagazine Network.

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December 24, 2013 | by

How CPR Can Save a Life

Image by Margaret RiegelMillions of people have been trained in CPR in recent decades, yet when people who aren’t in hospitals collapse from a sudden cardiac arrest, relatively few bystanders attempt resuscitation. Only one-fourth to one-third of those who might be helped by CPR receive it before paramedics arrive.

With so many people trained, why isn’t bystander CPR done more often?

For one thing, people forget what to do: the panic that may ensue is not conducive to accurate recall. Even those with medical training often can’t remember the steps just a few months after learning them. Rather than make a mistake, some bystanders simply do nothing beyond calling 911, even though emergency dispatchers often tell callers how to perform CPR.

Then there is the yuck factor: performing mouth-to-mouth resuscitation on a stranger. So pervasive is the feeling of reluctance that researchers decided to study whether rescue breathing is really necessary.

Two major studies, published in The New England Journal of Medicine in July 2010, clearly demonstrated that chest compressions alone were as good or even better than combining them with rescue breathing. In both studies, one conducted in Washington State and London and the other in Sweden, a slightly higher percentage of people who received only bystander chest compressions survived to be discharged from the hospital with good brain function.

When a person collapses suddenly because the heart’s electrical function goes awry, it turned out, there is often enough air in the lungs to sustain heart and brain function for a few minutes, as long as blood is pumped continuously to those vital organs. In addition, some people gasp while in cardiac arrest, which can bring more oxygen into the lungs. Indeed, the studies strongly suggested that interrupting chest compressions to administer rescue breaths actually diminishes the effectiveness of CPR in these patients.

Read the full article by Jane Brody at The New York Times.

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December 7, 2013 | by

Need to Save a Life? There’s an App for That.

Three years ago, San Ramon Valley Fire Chief Richard Price was eating dinner when he heard ambulance sirens. Someone next door had suffered a cardiac arrest and was unconscious.

“That whole time, while that crew was making their way to the scene, I had an AED in my car. I could’ve started CPR,” says Price. This event made Price realize that the system in place to help people during a cardiac crisis is not good enough. So, he — like many health care innovators today — turned to technology to enhance our society’s ability to save lives.

Every year, around 383,000 sudden cardiac arrests occur in the U.S. and less than eight percent of people who suffer them outside of a hospital survive. That’s because the first few minutes after cardiac arrest are vital to survival. After a person’s heart stops beating, brain damage can occur in four to six minutes. By 10 minutes, there is almost no chance of survival.

Even in Price’s former fire district, which he said had many advantages, ambulance response times were seven minutes in the city, eight in the suburbs, and fifteen in rural areas. Quality CPR given immediately after cardiac arrest can double, even triple, the chance of survival but this can only happen if CPR-trained people nearby know that someone needs their help.

That is the exact problem that Price is working to remedy.

Rather than merely reflecting on his experience as an unfortunate inevitability, Price was resolved to find out what more he could do to prevent similar situations in the future. That is how he came up with PulsePoint, an app that notifies CPR-trained bystanders of nearby cardiac arrests.

Read the full post by Taylor Kubota at the Xerox Healthbiz Decoded blog.

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