RFD Medic 5 at Mercy

July 1, 2014 | by

Rogers Fire Department App Asks Residents To Do CPR, Save Lives

Rogers Fire StationA new smartphone application that asks volunteers to help when someone nearby has a cardiac arrest could make the difference between life and death for some residents, said Tom Jenkins, Rogers fire chief.

“Over the course of the year, I think we will save a few more lives,” Jenkins said Friday.

On Tuesday, city aldermen approved spending about $45,000 to participate in an app by PulsePoint, a nonprofit organization that aims to provide a nationwide system that matches volunteers to people who need cardio-pulmonary resuscitation. The app will go live in Rogers within three months, Jenkins said.

Starting CPR immediately increases the chance of survival among cardiac arrest patients, said Richard Price, PulsePoint president and a former fire chief.

“We know bystanders can intervene and make a difference in people’s lives before firefighters arrive,” Price said.

During a heart attack, brain damage can start in about five minutes, and the survival rate drops to almost zero in 10 minutes, Price said. In Rogers, it takes an average of about 6 1/2 minutes for dispatchers to get the 911 call, notify firefighters, and for firefighters to suit up and drive to the location where a heart attack is happening, Jenkins said.

The cardiac arrest survival rate in Rogers was about 42 percent last year, he said.

Implementing the app is the second step to getting residents to participate in emergency care, Jenkins said. The Fire Department has pushed for residents to learn CPR for about three years, he said.

The strategy has worked, Jenkins said. The Rogers Fire Department has trained about 15,000 residents in CPR, and bystander participation is up.

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The Fire Department had about 100 bystanders help during emergencies last year when just two years ago that number was in the single digits, Jenkins said.

“Our community here in Rogers has really stepped up to learn CPR,” he said.

The PulsePoint Respond app is new, but participation is growing nationwide, Price said. The 3-year-old app is used in about 600 cities and communities nationwide and in 18 states. Another 200 cities are in the process of adding the app, he said.

Rogers will be the first to try the app in Arkansas, Price said. Jenkins said other cities may follow suit once they see how well the app works.

At A Glance

Bystander CPR

Effective bystander CPR provided immediately after sudden cardiac arrest can double or triple a victim’s chance of survival. In Rogers, the survival rate was 42 percent last year, compared to about 7 percent in 2010.

App Coverage

The PulsePoint Response app will cover Rogers and Little Flock and part of Benton County along Arkansas 12 and Arkansas 94 East. The app also acts as a registry for defibrillators and notifies volunteers where public defibrillators are located. For volunteers who register, the app also will relocate when they travel to other jurisdictions that use it. So, a Rogers traveler can be notified of a cardiac arrest while they are visiting Las Vegas, for example.

Survival Rate

Survival rates nationwide for sudden cardiac arrests are less than 8 percent. Only about a third of victims receive bystander CPR. Without oxygen-rich blood, permanent brain damage or death can occur in less than 8 minutes.

View the full story By Scarlet Simson at NWAonline.

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Drew Basse and Scott Brawner

May 27, 2014 | by

PulsePoint App Saves Life of Cardiac Arrest Victim

Life-saving CPR performed after mobile app notifies nearby off-duty firefighter

CFD #1 LogoCLACKAMAS, Ore., May 28, 2014 – On Friday, May 9, 2014 off-duty firefighter Scott Brawner was working out at a local health club when he received an alert through PulsePoint, a 9-1-1 connected mobile app designed to alert CPR-trained citizens of Sudden Cardiac Arrest (SCA) emergencies in their proximity. This alert saved a man’s life.

Using the map presented by the PulsePoint app, Scott immediately made his way to the reported patient location. In less than a minute, Scott found the man unconscious in the parking lot outside of the health facility where a security guard had first found him unresponsive and called 9-1-1. Scott immediately assessed and began hands-only CPR. He continued providing chest compressions until paramedics from American Medical Response (AMR) and Clackamas Fire District #1 arrived to provide advanced care.

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“As a fire fighter I know that every minute that passes without a SCA victim receiving resuscitation, the chances of that person surviving decrease 10 percent.” said Scott Brawner, Firefighter/Paramedic with Tualatin Valley Fire & Rescue (TVF&R). “By adopting PulsePoint, agencies are removing much of the fate and luck in survival by involving CPR-trained citizen rescuers in cardiac arrest response.”

On Saturday, May 17, 2014, at Adventist Medical Center in Portland, Oregon, Scott had the opportunity to meet the man he had saved just a week prior. His name is Drew Basse, a 57-year-old truck driver from Milwaukie, Oregon. Scott also met Drew’s son Shane, 31, and daughter Staci, 27. It was an emotional meeting filled with gratitude and appreciation as Drew is expected to fully recover with no loss of cognitive function because CPR was administered so quickly. The family was especially interested in learning more about the “miracle app” they had heard played such a key role in Drew’s survival.

“This app saved my Dad’s life,” said Shane Basse, “We’re so grateful to the PulsePoint Foundation for creating this life-saving app, Scott Brawner for his heroic actions and Clackamas Fire for not only their quick response, but for adopting this technology.”

“The PulsePoint app did its job by alerting a Good Samaritan simultaneously with the dispatch of our crews, ” said Bill Conway, EMS Officer for Clackamas Fire District #1. “This incredibly positive outcome is why Clackamas Fire, like so many organizations throughout the U.S., invested in this type of technology.”

The app on Scott’s phone is from the non-profit PulsePoint Foundation. The app is designed to reduce collapse-to-CPR and collapse-to-defibrillation times by increasing citizen awareness of cardiac events beyond a traditional “witnessed” area and by displaying the precise location of nearby public access defibrillators (AEDs).

About the PulsePoint Foundation
PulsePoint is a 501(c)(3) non-profit foundation based in the San Francisco Bay Area. Its mission is to make it much easier for citizens who are trained in CPR to use their life-saving skills to do just that…save lives! Through the use of modern, location-aware mobile devices PulsePoint is building applications that work with local public safety agencies to improve communications with citizens and empower them to help reduce the millions of annual deaths from sudden cardiac arrest.

Deployment of the PulsePoint app can significantly strengthen the “chain of survival” by improving bystander response to SCA victims in public settings and increasing the chance that lifesaving steps will be taken prior to the arrival of emergency medical services (EMS) professionals. Just two years after launching outside the San Ramon Valley (CA) the PulsePoint app has been adopted in 600 cities and communities in 18 states.

PulsePoint is built and maintained by volunteer engineers at Workday, a Silicon Valley-based company that creates enterprise cloud applications, and distributed by Physio-Control. The original idea came from Richard Price, the former chief of the San Ramon Valley Fire Department who wanted to bridge the gap between the critical minutes following SCA and the 13 million Americans who are CPR trained, but often don’t know their skills are required.

The PulsePoint app is available for iPhone and Android and can be downloaded from the iTunes Store™ and Google Play™. Learn more at www.pulsepoint.org.

About Clackamas Fire District #1
Clackamas Fire District #1 provides fire, rescue, and emergency medical services to the cities of Milwaukie, Oregon City, Happy Valley, Johnson City and a portion of Damascus as well as the unincorporated areas of Oak Lodge, Clackamas, Westwood, Carver, Redland, Beavercreek, Carus, Clarkes, and South End/Central Point.

The District has 17 fire stations strategically located throughout Clackamas County with a workforce of more than 200 employees and 100 volunteers. It is the second largest fire protection district in Oregon serving over 179,000 citizens in an area covering nearly 200 square miles.

Clackamas Fire District #1 is a CFAI Accredited agency meeting the highest standards in emergency service delivery.

About TVF&R
Tualatin Valley Fire & Rescue provides fire protection and emergency medical services to approximately 454,000 citizens in one of the fastest growing regions in Oregon. The District’s 210 square mile service area includes the cities of Beaverton, Durham, King City, Rivergrove, Sherwood, Tigard, Tualatin, West Linn, and Wilsonville, and unincorporated portions of Clackamas, Multnomah, and Washington County. TVF&R is a CFAI Accredited agency.

About Cardiac Arrest
Out-of-hospital cardiac arrest is a leading cause of death in the United States, accounting for an estimated 424,000 deaths each year, more than 1,000 deaths per day. The American Heart Association estimates that effective bystander CPR, provided immediately after cardiac arrest, can double or triple a person’s chance of survival. However, less than half of cardiac arrest victims receive bystander CPR and even fewer receive a potentially lifesaving therapeutic shock from a public access AED. Improving bystander CPR rates and access to AEDs is critical to survival.

Different than a heart attack, sudden cardiac arrest is caused when the heart’s electrical system malfunctions and the heart stops working properly. For every minute that passes without a SCA victim receiving resuscitation, the chances of that person surviving decrease 10 percent. After 10 minutes the chances of survival are minimal.

Contacts
Interview Requests & National Media
Shannon Smith
ssmith@smithmediarelations.com
C: (773) 339-7513
O: (616) 724-4256

General Inquires & Portland-Area Media
Brandon Paxton
brandon.paxton@clackamasfire.com
C: (503) 519-4123
P: (503) 294-3555

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November 21, 2013 | by

Did you know your smartphone can help save a life?

Press conference at 9:00 am to announce PulsePoint coverage in Clark County, Washington

CRESAVancouver, Wash. – November 22, 2013 – Now your smartphone can help you save a life. A free smartphone app called PulsePoint is now available in Clark County, Washington. PulsePoint enables subscribers who are CPR-trained to be alerted to a cardiac arrest at the same time emergency responders are notified.

Registered users will be notified when a cardiac arrest has occurred in a public place within their vicinity. PulsePoint will give the citizen responder mapping directions, notify them of any automatic external defibrillators (AEDs) in at area and provide the radio traffic of the emergency responders.

Early CPR is the key if the victim is to survive. When a person goes into cardiac arrest, their heart, brain and other vital organs no longer receive oxygen. Researchers have found that without early CPR within the first 3 to 5 minutes, victims’ chances of survival are dramatically reduced.

The free PulsePoint app can be found in the Apple App store, or in Android Apps on Google Play. Within the app select Clark County, Washington – CRESA. You only need to be willing to do “Hands-Only” CPR. According to the American Heart Association, Hands-Only CPR has been shown to be as effective as conventional CPR in the first minutes of cardiac arrest.

Subscribers can also view active fire and emergency medical incidents and monitor emergency radio traffic.

Businesses, schools and other public sites with an AED are asked to visit CRESA website to see if their AED is listed in the PulsePoint database. Register your AED here.

Play a key role in cardiac arrest victim’s survival – Learn CPR and become a PulsePoint subscriber today.

Media Events and PSA
Media are invited to attend a press conference where the CPR alert for cardiac arrests will officially launch.

What: Press Conference to unveil the PulsePoint smartphone app.
When: Friday, November 22nd at 9:00 am.
Where: Clark County Public Service Center, Rm 679, 1300 Franklin, Vancouver WA.
Activities: CRESA’s PulsePoint PSA unveiled; cardiac arrest survivor speaks on the importance of citizen response and CPR; PulsePoint demonstration

About the PulsePoint Foundation
PulsePoint is a 501(c)(3) non-profit foundation based in the San Francisco Bay Area. Its mission is to make it much easier for citizens who are trained in CPR to use their life saving skills to do just that…save lives! Through the use of modern, location-aware mobile devices PulsePoint is building applications that work with local public safety agencies to improve communications with citizens and empower them to help reduce the millions of annual deaths from sudden cardiac arrest. Learn more at www.pulsepoint.org or join the conversation at www.facebook.com/PulsePoint and @PulsePoint.

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View the CRESA/PulsePoint Public Service Announcement

Contact
Doug Smith-Lee
Clark Regional Emergency Services Agency
doug.smith-lee@clark.wa.gov
(360) 737-1911 ext. 3949
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November 11, 2013 | by

Here’s how to save a life

Daniel and Charlette SandersAfter Scott Hansen’s heart gave out last year, strangers used its power to give him another chance at life. When Bill Pelow’s heart stopped in 2011, Daniel Velazquez became his lifeline because of it.

Charlette Sanders isn’t a widow today and her children have a father because she learned the lifesaving technique during an emergency conversation with 911 operator Amy Breitenbach.

Cardiopulmonary resuscitation, better known as CPR, the only known method of keeping someone alive until medically necessary treatment can be administered, saves tens of thousands of lives in heart-related crises annually in the United States alone.

But as wonderful as that is, it is also true that tens of thousands of other Americans die because CPR isn’t used. The American Heart Association reports that less than one-third of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest victims — there are about 400,000 each year — receive CPR from a bystander.

David Slattery, Las Vegas Fire and Rescue’s medical director, said studies show that Americans find intervening “very scary” because they’re not medically trained and that fear often paralyzes them.

Considering that cardiac arrest survival falls an estimated 7 percent to 10 percent for every minute without CPR and that it takes an average of four to six minutes across the country for rescue personnel to arrive, the low rate of bystander CPR plays a critical role on outcomes.

Less than 8 percent of people who suffer cardiac arrest outside the hospital survive.

Read the full post by Paul Harasim at the Las Vegas Review-Journal.

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June 6, 2013 | by

Pulse3 Foundation expanding the PulsePoint smartphone app in Michigan

logo-pulse3_foundationSAGINAW, MI — Heart disease is taking a toll on the Great Lakes Bay Region, and the Michigan CardioVascular Institute Foundation is changing to take it on.

The foundation is changing its name to Pulse3 Foundation, said President and Chief Executive Officer Diane Fong. The private foundation will become a public charity, Fong said, and add five members to its board of directors from Saginaw, Bay and Midland counties.

“Heart disease is bigger than one organization,” she said. “Our goals, passion and commitment remains unchanged.”

The death rate from heart disease is higher in Michigan and the region than the national average.

Pulse3’s vision of a community free of heart disease remains strong with community-based, widespread, regional support, Fong said.

The foundation’s programs include the Run for Your Heart Fitness and Wellness Program, Run for Your Heart Community Races, Shocks & Saves alert system for cardiopulmonary resuscitation and automated external defibrillator emergencies, deployment of AED units in the community, CPR/ AED training, community education programs, college scholarships and continuing education programs for healthcare professionals.

One example of expanded programming is the Run for Your Heart program, Fong said. The foundation will partner with the Michigan State University Extension’s diabetes prevention program. The first 20 people who sign up will receive a scholarship to Pulse3’s Run for Your Heart program.

Fong said the charity also is expanding the PulsePoint smartphone app to Isabella, Clare and Gratiot counties. The app sends alerts to people trained in CPR when someone in public collapses from cardiac arrest.

Read the full post by The Saginaw News reporter Lindsay Knake on MLive.

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April 9, 2013 | by

New medical emergency smartphone app could help save lives

WXYZ DetroitDo you know CPR? Are you willing to help save a life?

Well, a new tool could enable you to act in the event of an emergency.

When someone is going into cardiac arrest, every minute counts. That’s why an app called PulsePoint helps put trained citizens at the scene of an emergency.

This app could really be the future of rescue operations. The app uses GPS and directs citizen rescuers to the exact location of the person in need of assistance.

Read the full article and watch the news segment by Alexandra Bahou at WXYZ-TV Channel 7.

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April 4, 2013 | by

Nurse uses lifesaving app to find, try to help man in cardiac arrest

Heather Rom (Portland Tribune)Heather Roms was inside her car near Pediatric Dental when she saw and heard the alert on her phone that someone nearby was having a cardiac emergency. The app gave her the address and location, and Roms quickly drove to Shari’s Restaurant, where a man was having a cardiac emergency.

A labor and delivery nurse who’s accustomed to using the most modern technology to save newborns in jeopardy relied on just her own skills to try and save a man’s life last week.

Heather Roms, 39, of West Linn, was just leaving her daughter’s dentist appointment about 9 a.m. March 27 on Southwest Town Center Loop in Wilsonville when she received an alert on her smartphone that someone nearby was having a cardiac emergency.

It was the first time she had seen the alert on her phone, and she guessed she must be pretty close to where it was taking place.

At first, the PulsePoint application showed only the address of the location where the emergency was happening. Those who subscribe to the app receive notification of the emergency at the same time as first responders.

In this instance, first responders were paramedics from Tualatin Valley Fire & Rescue and AMR ambulance.

At first, Roms wondered whether she should respond, not knowing how instantaneously she received the alert.

Read the full article by Michelle Te at the Portland Tribune.

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March 28, 2013 | by

Saving Lives with an App

Mobile app notifies registrants when CPR is needed

Chief PriceRichard Price had an idea that grew into a smartphone application, and then a foundation, that may very well change the way EMS responds to cardiac arrest calls. The idea will certainly save lives, and it all started at a deli over a pastrami and rye.

Birth of an App
“I was out to lunch and was sitting in a deli with a few other people when I heard sirens in the distance,” Price says. “The sirens got louder, and then they pulled up right in front of the deli where I was eating.”

It turned out that the EMS crews were responding to a cardiac arrest call in the building next door. “If I had known, I could have made a difference. I know CPR and I have an AED in my car,” Price says. The event made him think about his smartphone and how the device knew his location and could tell someone else. “The idea came that we could possibly notify someone who was nearby an event using his or her phone,” he says.

That was three years ago, and the result of that event, and Price’s subsequent idea, has been the creation of PulsePoint, which was launched in 2012. Though the technology is sophisticated, taking hundreds of hours and many people to bring the idea to fruition, the actual PulsePoint app is simple. Users who are trained in CPR and have registered with the system as willing to assist in an emergency cardiac arrest situation will be notified on their smartphone if someone nearby is having a cardiac arrest.

Read the full article by Cynthia Kincaid on JEMS.

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March 28, 2013 | by

Oregon Responder Alerted to Cardiac Arrest by PulsePoint

TVF&R LogoAn Oregon citizen, alerted to a cardiac arrest at a Wilsonville restaurant by a special signal on her smartphone, became the first citizen responder to arrive at the scene of a medical emergency on Wednesday using the PulsePoint alert notification system.

Tualatin Valley Fire and Rescue in Tigard, along with American Medical Response, were dispatched to a cardiac arrest at Shari’s Restaurant at 9:02 a.m. in Wilsonville. Simultaneously, TVF&R’s PulsePoint mobile app notified three nearby citizen responders that someone near their locations needed CPR.

Heather Roms, a registered nurse for Legacy Emanuel Medical Center in Portland, was leaving a nearby business when she received the alert and responded to the restaurant. Upon arriving, she began hands-only CPR until EMS crews arrived.

Read the full article on Firehouse.com.

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March 25, 2013 | by

You Can Become A (Life-Saving) Neighborhood Superhero

Cardiac Arrest Patient1,000 sudden cardiac deaths a day–and many preventable!

1,000 Americans die every day from sudden cardiac arrest, making it a leading cause of death in the US. But many of these deaths would be prevented if CPR was initiated, and an AED was deployed, in the first few minutes after a cardiac arrest. Over the past 50 years, 300 million people have been trained in CPR, yet today, CPR is only performed in about 25% of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest cases. Think about that–only 1 out of 4 times is CPR underway when paramedics arrive. And even worse, publicly available automated external defibrillators (AED’s), the ones you see in airports, schools and other places of assembly, like hotels, are retrieved and used only 1% or 2% of the time when available– primarily because lay rescuers don’t think about them, and don’t know where to find them. Without intervention, a cardiac arrest victim has only about 10 minutes to live. But CPR suspends time, essentially stopping that 10-minute clock, and sustains life until more advanced care can arrive. So after 10 minutes you have no chance of survival; and brain damage begins several minutes before that. Even some of the best EMS systems in the country have a response time goal of 7 minutes. Not much room for error; this excruciatingly short window of opportunity is exactly why most people do not survive a sudden cardiac arrest. Today, more than ever, citizens helping citizens is the only way for the “chain of survival” to work. Local government response times are not improving in this economy – if anything they are getting worse. This simple fact should “shock” you into action: When CPR begins, and an AED is deployed, in the first few minutes after a cardiac arrest, survival rates can approach 80%.

Read the full article by John Nosta at Forbes.

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