November 11, 2013 | by

Here’s how to save a life

Daniel and Charlette SandersAfter Scott Hansen’s heart gave out last year, strangers used its power to give him another chance at life. When Bill Pelow’s heart stopped in 2011, Daniel Velazquez became his lifeline because of it.

Charlette Sanders isn’t a widow today and her children have a father because she learned the lifesaving technique during an emergency conversation with 911 operator Amy Breitenbach.

Cardiopulmonary resuscitation, better known as CPR, the only known method of keeping someone alive until medically necessary treatment can be administered, saves tens of thousands of lives in heart-related crises annually in the United States alone.

But as wonderful as that is, it is also true that tens of thousands of other Americans die because CPR isn’t used. The American Heart Association reports that less than one-third of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest victims — there are about 400,000 each year — receive CPR from a bystander.

David Slattery, Las Vegas Fire and Rescue’s medical director, said studies show that Americans find intervening “very scary” because they’re not medically trained and that fear often paralyzes them.

Considering that cardiac arrest survival falls an estimated 7 percent to 10 percent for every minute without CPR and that it takes an average of four to six minutes across the country for rescue personnel to arrive, the low rate of bystander CPR plays a critical role on outcomes.

Less than 8 percent of people who suffer cardiac arrest outside the hospital survive.

Read the full post by Paul Harasim at the Las Vegas Review-Journal.

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November 9, 2013 | by

Heart Health Demystified with Mobile Tech

iPad ECGAccounting for 600,000 deaths per year, heart disease is the leading cause of death for men and women in the United States. With the help of technology, however, you can monitor your diet, track workouts and make lifestyle changes to help decrease the risk of heart disease.

First, use technology to keep track of important vitals that can affect your heart health. The Heart Health 2 app allows you to record your blood pressure, cholesterol, blood glucose levels, pulse and other stats. Not only can you have a better idea of these factors, but you can share this information with your doctors to help them better evaluate your needs.

Exercise is key to a healthy heart, and today’s apps make it possible to track your activity and your heart rate. The Withings Pulse Activity Tracker, for example, offers an app that lets you monitor activity levels, food intake, heart rate and sleep quality from your mobile device anytime day or night. You can also use the American Heart Association’s Walking Paths app to find new routes and track your daily walks.

Read the full post by Karen Schulz at the Verizon Wireless News Center.

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