April 13, 2015 | by

PulsePoint App Helps Save Life of Cardiac Arrest Victim

Media contacts:

Shannon Smith, PulsePoint Foundation
ssmith@smithmediarelations.com
O: (616) 724-4256
C: (773) 339-7513

Chris Ernst, El Camino Hospital
Chris_Ernst@elcaminohospital.org
O: (650) 962-5853
C: (415) 710-9445

Life-saving CPR performed after mobile app funded by El Camino Hospital
notifies nearby citizen responder

SUNNYVALE, Calif., April 13, 2015 – On Wednesday, March 25, 2015 lifelong Sunnyvale resident Walter Huber was sitting down to dinner when he received an alert through PulsePoint, a 9-1-1 connected mobile app designed to alert CPR-trained citizens of sudden cardiac arrest (SCA) emergencies in their vicinity. This app alert helped save a man’s life.

The PulsePoint app displayed a map showing Huber, 21, the location of the emergency, which was based on 9-1-1 call information. Using this map Huber made his way to the reported SCA patient’s location—a soccer field just steps from his home—where he found a man unconscious and surrounded by his teammates. Just minutes earlier the man had collapsed, unresponsive and without a pulse, prompting his teammates to call 9-1-1. Huber, who is CPR trained, immediately assessed the patient and began hands-only CPR. He provided chest compressions until a Sunnyvale Department of Public Safety Officer arrived in a patrol car equipped with an Automated External Defibrillator (AED). The AED delivered a life-saving shock, effectively bringing Farid Rashti, 63, back to life.

“When someone suffers a sudden cardiac arrest, the heart stops beating without any warning so time is critical,” said Dr. Chad Rammohan, M.D., medical director of Cardiac Catheterization Lab and Chest Pain Center at El Camino Hospital and a Palo Alto Medical Foundation physician. “It’s the ‘electrical shock’ from the AED that helps to restore the person’s heartbeat and it’s the mechanical pumping from CPR that helps the SCA victim to recover some blood flow to vital organs such as the brain, heart, and the rest of the body.”

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A family history of heart disease coupled with a 2004 heart attack, resulting in quadruple bypass surgery, has led Rashti, a Campbell, Calif. resident, to live a healthy lifestyle. However, while playing soccer on March 25th, he was hit by the ball on the left side of his chest. He felt a sharp pain, unlike during his earlier heart attack. He switched to goalie where he could catch his breath when, he recalls “suddenly everything started to go black and that is the last thing I remember.” Rashti had suffered a SCA. The only way for a person to survive a SCA is to immediately receive 1) CPR, 2) an electrical shock from an AED, and 3) transport to the closest hospital emergency room.

“Thankfully the PulsePoint app alerted me to someone in need, only steps away, so I could put my training to good use and, as it turns out, help save a life,” said Huber, a Mission College student. “The fact that you could potentially save a life with this app confirms how important it is for everyone to learn CPR and download PulsePoint.”

“I’m so grateful that I was in public, surrounded by people,” said Rashti from his home where he’s been recovering. “Without my friends calling 9-1-1, the PulsePoint responder starting CPR and the patrol officer shocking me back to life with an AED, I would not be alive today.”

Santa Clara County, in which the City of Sunnyvale is located, was one of the first counties in the nation to fully integrate this technology with its 9-1-1 system. The collaboration and allocated resources from the Santa Clara County fire departments, the PulsePoint Foundation, El Camino Hospital, and the tech company Workday brought this lifesaving technology to Santa Clara County citizens. The coordinated effort by Santa Clara County, Rashti’s teammates, the PulsePoint-notified citizen responder and the care provided by the emergency room at Kaiser Permanente Santa Clara Medical Center helped save Rashti’s life.

“Every element in this chain of survival was enhanced by quick action and cutting edge technology. All Sunnyvale public safety officers are trained as police officers, firefighters and EMTs so they arrive on scene and immediately bring life-saving support with an AED and first aid equipment,” said Steve Drewniany, Deputy Chief of the Sunnyvale Department of Public Safety. “It was the quick action by Farid’s friends and Walter that set the entire response in motion. You couldn’t ask for a better example of how technology like PulsePoint and AEDs can save lives, which is why we’re making full use of them here in Sunnyvale.”

The PulsePoint mobile app is designed to reduce collapse-to-CPR and collapse-to-defibrillation times by increasing citizen awareness of cardiac events beyond a traditional “witnessed” area. The app also directs users to the precise location of nearby public AEDs. The free app is available for download on iTunes and Google Play.

About the PulsePoint Foundation
PulsePoint is a 501(c)(3) non-profit foundation based in the San Francisco Bay Area. Through the use of location-aware mobile devices PulsePoint is building applications that work with local public safety agencies to improve communications with citizens, empowering them to help reduce the millions of annual deaths from sudden cardiac arrest (SCA). Deployment of the PulsePoint app can significantly strengthen the “chain of survival” by improving bystander response to cardiac arrest victims and increasing the chance that lifesaving steps will be taken prior to the arrival of emergency medical services (EMS). PulsePoint is supported by the Wireless Foundation, built and maintained by volunteer engineers at Workday and distributed by our marketing and implementation partner Physio-Control, Inc. Learn more at www.pulsepoint.org or join the conversation at Facebook and Twitter.

About Sunnyvale Department of Public Safety
Located in the San Francisco Bay Area, the City of Sunnyvale Department of Public Safety is one of the largest fully-integrated Police, Fire, and Emergency Medical Services (EMS) public entities in the United States serving a City of over 147,000 residents. All of the Department’s Officers are fully qualified cross-trained Police Officers, Firefighters, and EMT-Basic professionals. Public Safety Officers fulfill these roles in their daily duties, ensuring the highest levels of efficiency and competency for the Sunnyvale community.

About El Camino Hospital
El Camino Hospital is an acute-care, 443-bed, nonprofit and locally governed organization with campuses in Mountain View and Los Gatos, California. In addition to heart and vascular care, key medical specialties include behavioral health, cancer, men’s health, neuroscience, orthopedic and spine, senior health, urology, and the first Women’s Hospital in Northern California. The hospital is recognized as a national leader in the use of health information technology and wireless communications, and has been awarded the Gold Seal of Approval from The Joint Commission as a Primary Stroke Center as well as back-to-back ANCC Magnet Recognitions for Nursing Care. To learn more, visit our website, find us on Facebook, follow us on Twitter, or view videos on YouTube. For a physician referral, visit our website or call the El Camino Health Line at 800-216-5556.

About Cardiac Arrest
Out-of-hospital cardiac arrest is a leading cause of death in the United States, accounting for an estimated 424,000 deaths each year, more than 1,000 deaths per day. The American Heart Association estimates that effective bystander CPR, provided immediately after cardiac arrest, can double or triple a person’s chance of survival. However, less than half of cardiac arrest victims receive bystander CPR and even fewer receive a potentially lifesaving therapeutic shock from a public access AED. Improving bystander CPR rates and access to AEDs is critical to chain of survival, which requires: (1) early recognition of the emergency and phoning 911 for EMS, (2) early bystander CPR, (3) early delivery of a shock via a defibrillator if indicated and (4) early advanced life support and post-resuscitation care delivered by healthcare providers.

Different than a heart attack, sudden cardiac arrest is caused when the heart’s electrical system malfunctions and the heart stops working properly. For every minute that passes without a SCA victim receiving resuscitation, the chances of that person surviving decrease 10 percent. After 10 minutes the chances of survival are minimal.

Source: Business Wire

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Media Assets

PulsePoint App Visuals
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SpacerSanta Clara County/SF Bay Area Responders (Map View)

Farid Rashti (Survivor)
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Walter Huber (PulsePoint Responder)
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SpacerChildhood Photo Walter Huber grew up wanting to be in public service. This picture was taken while Huber was just at toddler, sitting in a Sunnyvale fire truck.

Deputy Chief Steve Drewniany, City of Sunnyvale Department of Public Safety (DPS)
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Richard Price, Founder/President, PulsePoint Foundation
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Dr. Chad Rammohan
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SpacerCPR/AED Audio Recorded from Sunnyvale Police Officer’s Dash Cam Belt Mic

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June 18, 2014 | by

An App That Turns Everyday Bystanders Into Everyday Heroes

PulsePoint saves lives by improving the way we respond to those in distress.

Justin Sullivan/Getty ImagesWhen an airplane passenger is in physical distress, the flight attendant calls through the speakers asking if medical professionals are on board. It’s a simple action that can make a huge difference. What if we could mimic this same outreach, 10,000 feet below, everyday on the ground?

That’s exactly what the smart phone app PulsePoint (for download here) makes possible, according to Emergency Management. Using the gadgets we all carry every day, municipalities that use the free mobile service are able to send out alerts to CPR-certified citizens who are nearby someone in need. In many cases, there are just a few minutes between life and death, so every second counts. By quickening response times, this app can help save lives — before an ambulance is even in sight.

PulsePoint doesn’t replace dispatched responders, but as fast as ambulances and emergency medical technicians try to arrive, they’re often not quick enough. Once 9-1-1 is dialed and the available crew is actually with the patient, it can be too late – making those that can arrive quicker a vital resource.

San Jose became the first area city to use PulsePoint in 2012 — the app’s founder and CEO, Richard Price, is from the area, having worked as an ex-fire chief of the San Ramon Valley Fire Protection District. Since then, it’s caught on thanks to support from a local hospital and the results it provides. A local hospital is also planning a public registry of automated defibrillators through a new, related app, PulsePoint AED.

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With decreasing local budgets for emergency response, increasing populations and traffic congestion, the demand for innovations like PulsePoint is greater than ever. By alerting off-duty first responders, medical professionals, and other CPR certified individuals of a nearby need, PulsePoint turns them into valuable lifesavers, all with the tap of a phone, making the app early — and effective — when time means everything.

View the full story by Harrison Potter at NationSwell.

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February 16, 2014 | by

Apps That Could Save Your Life

Technology is making it easy for strangers to save the day or even for you to keep the kiddos from catching the crud. You’re already carrying a medical device and it’s a smartphone full of life-saving apps.

First, turning everyday citizens into superheroes, the PulsePoint App notifies CPR Certified users if someone nearby, is having a cardiac emergency. The app also pinpoints the nearest defibrillator. Without one, the chances of survival for cardiac patients, decreases 10 percent each minute. The PulsePoint App is free

Next, Sleep Apnea Treatment Centers of America’s SnoreOMeter gives you information you can use to shame your significant other, but it can also help diagnose a serious underlying issue. Record your snore for up to 30 seconds, including any lapses in breathing, then rate the decibel level. The SnoreOMeter compares your snore to a jackhammer or a blow dryer. You can even put your friends to sleep when you share the results on Facebook. This app is also free.

And, the flu is no joke! Tracking hot zones is easy with the Sickweather App. It scours social media for posts with key words like ‘flu’ and ‘sick’, then lets you know when you’re approaching Sick Town. You can download Sickweather for free in the app store.

Trouble viewing video? Try this link to the original story.

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September 30, 2013 | by

PulsePoint app review by appPicker

PulsePoint Homescreen IconIntroduction
PulsePoint is a very interesting app which is designed to empower ordinary people such as you and I with the ability to track medical emergencies as they happen and provide real-time medical assistance to people in our local area who are currently suffering from cardiac arrest.

If you’re trained in CPR then I would definitely suggest downloading this app and keeping it handy on your iPhone because you can set it up to notify you with an alert whenever someone needs help in your local area.
This definitely sounds like a worthy cause to me, and the app itself is very professionally developed so I would please urge you to consider checking it out.

Kickstart My Heart
The tagline for this app is “Enabling Citizen Superheroes,” and that is pretty much what you’ll become if you keep PulsePoint on your iPhone!

When you first start using this app, you’ll want to search in the Agencies section. This can be done either by agency, city, or zip code, and will enable you to find medical emergency services in your area so that you can receive notifications and information relevant to your actual location.

Selecting an agency will provide you with information such as the area it serves and a historical profile. By tapping the Follow button in the top right-hand corner you can receive updates in real time any time there is an emergency callout made by the given agency.

Read the full story by Mark Bangs at appPicker.

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September 9, 2013 | by

PulsePoint Foundation Announces Significant Usability Enhancements in Latest Release

New app version includes most requested features within a completely redesigned user interface

PulsePoint App LVFRLAS VEGAS (September 9, 2013) – At EMS World today the PulsePoint Foundation debuted a completely redesigned and extended version of its revolutionary CPR/AED “citizen responder” mobile phone application. The PulsePoint app enables members of the public to provide immediate life-saving assistance to victims of sudden cardiac arrest while professional responders are making their way to the scene.

“After calling 911, getting CPR started and applying an AED are the critical first steps in Sudden Cardiac Arrest survival,” said Richard Price, President of the PulsePoint Foundation. “In most cases no one is in a better position to positively affect the outcome of a cardiac arrest than nearby CPR/AED trained citizens.” The PulsePoint app has been activated on 1,500 actual cardiac emergencies informing nearly 6,000 nearby citizen rescuers. More than 350 communities across 14 states have enabled citizen response through PulsePoint with most computer-aided dispatch systems now supported. 75,000 people carry the PulsePoint app on their smartphone.

Sudden Cardiac Arrest is a leading cause of death in the United States, accounting for an estimated 325,000 deaths each year. “Today we are thrilled to announce the availability of the remarkable PulsePoint app to our 610,000 residents and several million annual visitors,” said William McDonald, Fire Chief for Las Vegas Fire & Rescue. “Empowering our citizens to help save lives in partnership with our organization is extremely satisfying.”

The highly anticipated release includes significant usability enhancements implemented within a beautiful new user interface. As with the previous release, the application was written by an all-volunteer engineering team from Workday, Inc. The announcement today is for the iOS version of the application. An update to the Android version will follow in the near future.

About the PulsePoint Foundation
PulsePoint is a 501(c)(3) non-profit foundation based in the San Francisco Bay Area committed to making it much easier for citizens who are trained in CPR to use their life saving skills to do just that… save lives! Through the use of modern, location-aware mobile devices PulsePoint is building applications that work with local public safety agencies to improve communications with citizens and empower them to help reduce the millions of annual deaths from sudden cardiac arrest. For more information visit PulsePoint.org

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June 29, 2013 | by

PulsePoint Responder – In Her Own Words

On March 27th 2013, the PulsePoint mobile app deployed in Tualatin Valley Fire and Rescue notified three nearby citizen responders that someone close to their location was in need of CPR. Heather Roms, who is an RN for Legacy Emanuel Medical Center in Portland, was just leaving a nearby business when she received the PulsePoint notification on her smartphone. Heather responded and began CPR until EMS crews arrived. Heather stated that she heard about the app from her mother who works at a nearby middle school and was happy to be available to respond and help. Watch her story below.

Click here if video not displaying properly.

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March 1, 2012 | by

Follow PulsePoint app activations in real time on Twitter

On March 1st, the foundation began broadcasting PulsePoint app activations in real time on Twitter. The intent is to increase awareness of the app and its role in the community and to encourage app installs and citizen-helping-citizen participation. The tweet will include how many citizen rescuers were located in the immediate area and notified. The tweet text looks like this:

@SJFD CPR Activation at 10:49 AM PST (14TH ST); 14 citizen responders just notified. #PulsePointSaves

To receive these live updates follow the PulsePoint Foundation @1000livesaday using the button above.

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