iPhone AED Photo

June 3, 2014 | by

El Camino Hospital Collaborates With PulsePoint Foundation To Launch Crowd-Sourced Automatic External Defibrillator (AED) Registry

Santa Clara County first in the nation to launch innovative AED app

MOUNTAIN VIEW, Calif., June 3, 2014 – Today, El Camino Hospital, in collaboration with the PulsePoint Foundation, announced the launch of the second PulsePoint mobile app, PulsePoint AED, which is designed to build the most comprehensive registry of public automated external defibrillators (AED) available for use during sudden cardiac emergencies. Santa Clara County is the first to roll out this new app, which is available for free download from the iTunes Store and Google Play.

In conjunction with the launch of the PulsePoint AED app, El Camino Hospital is hosting an AED Location Contest, where participants locate and submit unregistered AEDs in Santa Clara County using the PulsePoint AED app. The top three winners will each receive a prize, such as an iPad.

“We are pleased to continue our partnership with the PulsePoint Foundation on another life-saving resource for our community,” said Tomi Ryba, president and chief executive officer of El Camino Hospital. “This week is National CPR and AED Awareness Week and the launch of the AED app is a great opportunity for our community to actively participate in identifying local AEDs and educating themselves about the life-saving potential of CPR and AEDs.”

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“We are grateful for the ongoing support from El Camino Hospital and the PulsePoint Foundation in educating our community around the importance of CPR and AED use, “ said Chief Ken Kehmna, Santa Clara County Fire District. “This latest app is a vital resource in providing the most updated information on public AEDs to emergency first responders and CPR-trained citizen responders alike.”

The American Heart Association estimates that immediate cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) and early defibrillation with an AED can more than double a victim’s chance of survival. Yet, finding the nearest AED can be difficult at the time of a sudden cardiac emergency. The PulsePoint AED app enables users to report and update public AED locations simply by taking a photo of the AED using their iPhone or Android mobile phone and uploading the photo and location information to the registry. All validated information uploaded into the registry is also provided to the local emergency communications center for real-time display on dispatcher consoles during calls for assistance. Additionally, the app is integrated with the existing PulsePoint Respond CPR app, alerting CPR-trained citizen bystanders of the nearest AED location in the event of a sudden cardiac emergency.

For more information about the PulsePoint apps, please visit: www.elcaminohospital.org/CPRHelpNow

About El Camino Hospital
El Camino Hospital is an acute-care, 443-bed, nonprofit and locally governed organization with campuses in Mountain View and Los Gatos, Calif. In addition to state-of-the-art emergency departments, key medical specialties include behavioral health, cancer care, genomic medicine, heart and vascular, neuroscience, orthopedic and spine, senior health, urology, and the only Women’s Hospital in Northern California. The hospital is recognized as a national leader in the use of health information technology and wireless communications, and has been awarded the Gold Seal of Approval from The Joint Commission as a Primary Stroke Center as well as back-to-back ANCC Magnet Recognitions for Nursing Care.

To learn more, visit our website, find us on Facebook, follow us on Twitter, or view our videos on YouTube. For a physician referral, visit our website or call the El Camino Health Line at 800-216-5556.

About the PulsePoint Foundation
PulsePoint is a 501(c)(3) non-profit foundation based in the San Francisco Bay Area. Its mission is to make it much easier for citizens who are trained in CPR to use their life-saving skills to do just that…save lives! Through the use of modern, location-aware mobile devices PulsePoint is building applications that work with local public safety agencies to improve communications with citizens and empower them to help reduce the millions of annual deaths from sudden cardiac arrest. Learn more at www.pulsepoint.org. Follow the PulsePoint Foundation on Facebook and Twitter.

Media Contact:
Chris Ernst, 650-962-5853
chris.ernst@elcaminohospital.org

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January 25, 2014 | by

PulsePoint App Helps EMS Save Cardiac Arrest Lives

This week on the show, I thought I would review the PulsePoint app from the PulsePoint Foundation at PulsePoint.org. I’ve interviewed Richard Price from PulsePoint a few times on the MedicCast and featured him last year as an EMS 10 Innovator on the MedicCast TV weekly commentary but I’ve never actually reviewed the app itself.

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App Notifies Bystander CPR Providers

For those of you who don’t know what it is, the PulsePoint app is a mobile app that connects bystander CPR trained individuals to any nearby reported cardiac arrests in a given jurisdiction. It works like this. First a jurisdiction has to sign up to integrate their computer dispatch system with the PulsePoint system.

Then, when a cardiac arrest is reported, not only are EMS, Fire and police crews dispatched, bystanders who have installed the app in the area are also alerted when they’re within about a 1/4 mile of the GPS location reported by the 911 call. It gives them walking directions to the location of the cardiac arrest patient and nearby AEDs.

Early Compressions Key to Saving Life

The goal is to get bystander compressions started as soon as possible, before EMS arrives on the scene, giving the patient the best chance of survival. This system has already saved countless lives and is installed in hundreds of jurisdictions worldwide.

Read the full post and learn more about Jamie Davis at The MedicCast.

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September 9, 2013 | by

PulsePoint Foundation Announces Significant Usability Enhancements in Latest Release

New app version includes most requested features within a completely redesigned user interface

PulsePoint App LVFRLAS VEGAS (September 9, 2013) – At EMS World today the PulsePoint Foundation debuted a completely redesigned and extended version of its revolutionary CPR/AED “citizen responder” mobile phone application. The PulsePoint app enables members of the public to provide immediate life-saving assistance to victims of sudden cardiac arrest while professional responders are making their way to the scene.

“After calling 911, getting CPR started and applying an AED are the critical first steps in Sudden Cardiac Arrest survival,” said Richard Price, President of the PulsePoint Foundation. “In most cases no one is in a better position to positively affect the outcome of a cardiac arrest than nearby CPR/AED trained citizens.” The PulsePoint app has been activated on 1,500 actual cardiac emergencies informing nearly 6,000 nearby citizen rescuers. More than 350 communities across 14 states have enabled citizen response through PulsePoint with most computer-aided dispatch systems now supported. 75,000 people carry the PulsePoint app on their smartphone.

Sudden Cardiac Arrest is a leading cause of death in the United States, accounting for an estimated 325,000 deaths each year. “Today we are thrilled to announce the availability of the remarkable PulsePoint app to our 610,000 residents and several million annual visitors,” said William McDonald, Fire Chief for Las Vegas Fire & Rescue. “Empowering our citizens to help save lives in partnership with our organization is extremely satisfying.”

The highly anticipated release includes significant usability enhancements implemented within a beautiful new user interface. As with the previous release, the application was written by an all-volunteer engineering team from Workday, Inc. The announcement today is for the iOS version of the application. An update to the Android version will follow in the near future.

About the PulsePoint Foundation
PulsePoint is a 501(c)(3) non-profit foundation based in the San Francisco Bay Area committed to making it much easier for citizens who are trained in CPR to use their life saving skills to do just that… save lives! Through the use of modern, location-aware mobile devices PulsePoint is building applications that work with local public safety agencies to improve communications with citizens and empower them to help reduce the millions of annual deaths from sudden cardiac arrest. For more information visit PulsePoint.org

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May 30, 2012 | by

Enabling Citizen Heroes

This article is reprinted with permission from EMS Insider

Add a mobile app to your CPR program

EMS InsiderWhen it comes to cardiac arrests, a few well-known facts exist: Time is muscle; the window of opportunity to save a patient whose heart has stopped is excruciatingly small; and getting responders who know CPR to the patient as soon as possible provides the best chance for survival. The third fact was brought home to San Ramon Valley (Calif.) Fire Protection District (SRVFPD) Fire Chief Richard Price during lunch one day. While he was eating at a local deli, he heard sirens in the distance. Then he watched as the engine eventually stopped in front of the restaurant. Because he does not receive pages for medical emergencies, he was unaware that someone had collapsed in cardiac arrest just next door. Had he known, he could have been there in seconds to start CPR and use the AED in his vehicle before the crews arrived. This incident gave Price an idea. With the current cell phone technology and GPS, there must be a way to alert staff who may be in the area of a cardiac arrest, he thought. “It was very conceptual at that time. The idea grew out of that,” Price says. The “idea” evolved into a CPR mobile app for the iPhone and Android, that eventually became known as PulsePoint. Price expanded on his original idea to include citizens trained in CPR, who have indicated they’re willing to assist in case of an emergency. The app uses the GPS feature on the phone to locate citizens who have signed up for the program and are in the vicinity of a cardiac arrest patient. Notifications are sent only if the victim is in a public place and only to potential rescuers within walking distance of the emergency. The application also directs rescuers to the exact location of the closest AED. “We crowd source good Samaritans,” Price says. Price knew he needed help to develop the mobile app, so the district partnered with interns from the College of Informatics at Northern Kentucky University. While they worked out the technical details, Price attended to other issues. Initially, some concern was expressed about sending too many rescuers to what can often be a chaotic scene. However, Price says that this seldom happens. “We can always make the notification circle smaller, if we get to that problem,” he says. Even in the limited cases where extra rescuers respond, it hasn’t been an issue, Price says. On one occasion, a person suffered a cardiac arrest at a coffee shop and a large number of rescuers responded. But instead of causing confusion or getting in the way, they did a good job assigning tasks, and those who weren’t directly involved in the rescue attempt helped by clapping to the beat of the chest compressions.

Privacy issues
Price notes that the chain of survival depends on training people in CPR and sending them out into their communities to respond when needed. “The app doesn’t really change that very much. It just takes some of the fate out of it,” he says. Still, certain privacy precautions had to be considered. To protect the rescuer’s information, the app doesn’t know the identity of the responders—it simply locates a “device” by accessing the unique identification number, which is required for the PulsePoint server to locate and send alert messages to a specific device. Price says the app doesn’t access any other information on the responder’s device. “No personal information is ever collected or retained,” he says. Because the activation occurs within an exceptionally limited radius—within walking distance—the app only alerts people to emergencies in their immediate vicinity. “It makes you more aware of what’s happening nearby you,” he says. He says they were also careful to consider possible Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) violations when designing the app. No patient information is ever broadcast or known by PulsePoint. Because PulsePoint doesn’t know who responded, the citizen rescuers are not informed of outcomes. “Occasionally circumstances allow the citizen rescuers to come together with survivors, but it’s a careful, respectful process,” Price says. The issue only becomes problematic if there’s an infectious disease concern.

Where’s the AED?
The biggest hurdle for a seamless citizen CPR response is locating public AEDs. Price says that the district has done a good job of promoting the use of AEDs, but locating them and ensuring they’re properly maintained has been a challenge. “When you’re dispatching people to them, the standard is higher,” he says. “You need to know one is there.” Despite a vigorous awareness program in San Ramon Valley, the use rates of AEDs among citizens are low. Price believes the area for which emergency responders should commit additional resources. “AEDs need to rise to the importance of fire extinguishers,” he says. Some communities are starting to include AED location information in their computer-aided design (CAD) system so dispatchers can provide not only CPR instructions, but also the location of a nearby AED.

PulsePoint foundation
Once the district developed the app, they wanted to share it—and not just with their neighbors. “We want to be around the globe,” Price says. To do so, they created the PulsePoint Foundation, a 501(c)3 nonprofit organization that provides and supports the app free of charge. Supporting services are also provided at no charge to public safety agencies that offer the CPR app in their community. However, charges from the CAD system vendor may occur, which interface with the app. The foundation is working with the CAD vendors to moderate these costs. Currently, the PulsePoint Foundation is working with more than 150 organizations in the deployment of the app.

Community outreach
To launch a successful CPR mobile app program, community outreach is critical. Price recommends a multi-pronged marketing program to encourage citizen awareness and ongoing involvement. The district started with a public service announcement in movie theaters and other venues to raise awareness of both the app and the importance of citizen CPR. SRVFPD used university interns to help develop the PSA. “It was a low-cost way to create tremendous
value,” Price says. The district spent very little public money, and the students received real-world experience. “It gave meaning to their studies,” Price says. “It’s a win-win.” The district continues to promote CPR at all community events, and is working to provide CPR training to all seventh graders in the local school district. It also established a program to manage the maintenance of the approximately 200 public AEDs in the community. “We know where every single one is and have hands on them every six months,” Price says.

Upgrades added
A number of upgrades have been added to the program since the original application launched. A streaming radio function allows citizens to listen to emergency calls anywhere in the world. Most recently, a Twitter feature began broadcasting PulsePoint app CPR activations in real time. The tweet includes the time of activation, the general location and the number of citizen rescuers notified. The goal is to increase awareness of the app and the role it plays in saving lives. The Twitter feed can be found at @1000livesaday, a reference to the number of people who die daily in the U.S. from sudden cardiac arrest. Price says the number of activations is around one per day. On average, 3-4 citizens respond per incident. “I’ve seen as many as 22,” he says. The next release of the app will include a survey tool sent one hour after app users were notified of a need for CPR. The goal is to collect data on the responses to the notifications and create a clearer picture of what happens during the response before the professionals arrive. It will attempt to find out whether a person responded to the notification and if not, why. If they did respond, they’ll be asked whether they performed CPR, if an AED was available, and if so, whether it was used. The optional survey will continue to allow the citizen responder to remain anonymous, if desired. Price says the survey is being developed by Bentley J. Bobrow, MD, medical director of the Bureau of Emergency Services Arizona Department of Health Services; and Steven C. Brooks, MD, MHSc FRCPC, emergency physician and scientist at Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre and assistant professor at the University of Toronto.

Summary
Because CPR has been around for 50 years, Price says sometimes it can be hard to find something exciting about it. But the process of developing the app and sharing it with others has been just that. “We were right at the time in history when it was all possible. Six months earlier, and it would not have been possible,” he says. Through this process, SRVFPD learned something about human beings that they probably already knew—people really want to help others. “This is a way, at no cost, you can make a significant difference in [out-of-hospital cardiac arrest] survivability,” Price says. “Think about the force multiplier—it’s a huge deal.” However, he warns, the app isn’t a panacea. “It works best in systems that are already good,” he says. That means good citizen CPR programs, an active AED strategy and a strong activation policy for ST-elevation myocardial infarction patients. “It ties a lot of things together and makes good systems pay off bigger,” he says. Although good work can often go unrewarded, this isn’t the case for Price. In February, the Danville Area Chamber of Commerce and the San Ramon Valley Times named Price “Citizen of the Year” for his innovative efforts to protect the lives of the citizens in his jurisdiction and beyond.

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July 8, 2011 | by

PulsePoint Foundation Begins Work to Extend Reach of Lifesaving Fire Department Mobile Phone App

SAN RAMON, CA – The San Ramon Valley Fire Protection District is proud to announce the formation of the PulsePoint Foundation. The new nonprofit organization has been established to guide, enhance and expand the reach of the Fire Department CPR notification app released earlier this year. The Fire Department app empowers everyday citizens to provide life-saving assistance to victims of Sudden Cardiac Arrest. “The app crowd-sources Good Samaritans to events where the potential need for bystander CPR is high,” said Fire Chief Richard Price. “The vital work of the PulsePoint Foundation has already begun,” added Price. “PulsePoint is set to begin partnering with nearly two hundred fire and EMS agencies that have expressed interest in deploying the application in their communities.”

Although the application was pioneered and tested in the San Ramon Valley, the Fire District has always been anxious to share its life saving potential. Forming an independent and external foundation to distribute and support the application will help facilitate and speed adoption by other communities.

Intergraph Corporation, a leading Computer-aided Dispatch system vendor, has announced plans to offer the PulsePoint solution to all its accounts – which together cover one in twelve people worldwide. “Intergraph is proud to partner with the PulsePoint Foundation to facilitate this life-saving technology. The combination of PulsePoint’s CPR application and Intergraph’s global leadership in public safety solutions is a perfect match to achieve the ultimate objective of protecting lives,” said Jay Stinson, VP & General Manager, Intergraph Public Safety.

The PulsePoint Foundation will be guided by an Advisory Board made up of visionaries in the tech and medical industries, including Dr. Ben Bobrow of the Arizona Department of Health Services, Co-Founder and Co-CEO Dave Duffield of Workday, CIO Tim Ferguson of Northern Kentucky University, CEO Tim O’Reilly of O’Reilly Media, and President Jack Parow of the International Association of Fire Chiefs. The Board also includes a list of influential community leaders and business professionals including Bill Coy, Leadership Practice Director of La Piana Consulting, Petros Dermetzis, VP of Development at Workday, Joe Farrell, CEO of Redwood Orthopaedic Physical Therapy, Don Ledoux, Partner at Summit Financial Group, David Rice, President of the Tri-Valley Community Foundation, and Matt Stamey, Director at the San Ramon Valley Fire Protection District. The board has recruited Richard Price, Fire Chief of the San Ramon Valley Fire Protection District, to serve as the Foundation’s president.

The application has received several international awards including the Cellular Telecommunications and Internet Association (CTIA) 2011 VITA Wireless Samaritan Award, a 2011 Computerworld Honors Program Laureate Award for Innovation, an American Heart Association Life Saver Heart Partner Award, and an IADAS Webby Official Honoree award for the Best Use of GPS or Location Technology. The Public Service Announcement designed to promote awareness and adoption of the application also received two Telly Awards.

The potential of the application also caught the attention of some of the country’s leading resuscitation experts, including partners of The HeartRescue Project, a five-state effort funded by the Medtronic Foundation designed to improve cardiac arrest survival rates.

“We know that improved survivor rates begin with improved bystander response,” says Dr. Michael Sayre, an associate professor of emergency medicine at The Ohio State University and the HeartRescue Project medical director. “By taking advantage of advances in mobile technology, we can bring nearby lifesavers right to the scene to begin CPR, saving precious seconds.” One of the first states planning to deploy the application is Arizona, a HeartRescue Project participant.

Both the San Ramon Valley Fire Protection District and Northern Kentucky University and its College of Informatics have generously donated all rights from their original work on the application to the foundation for the benefit of society.

“Collaboration with the PulsePoint Foundation perfectly aligns with Northern Kentucky University’s community outreach mission. This innovative technology has true potential to change and save lives and we are proud to be part of such an initiative,” said James Votruba, President of NKU.

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March 16, 2011 | by

SF Fire to Implement CPR iPhone App

At a press conference, today, March 16, The City of San Francisco became the first major city to publicly announce support for the San Ramon Valley Fire Protect District-pioneered “Fire Department” iPhone application.

In a media release the San Francisco City Attorney Dennis Herrera and San Francisco Fire Chief Joanne Hayes-White announced the SF Fire App Initiative, an extensive citywide effort to reduce heart attack deaths with the implementation of the Fire Department smart phone application which will notify CPR-trained volunteers to assist nearby cardiac arrest victims.

Earlier this year, San Ramon Valley Fire Protection District Chief Richard Price launched the Fire Department iPhone application that links to the SRVFPD computer-aided dispatch (CAD) system to notify CPR-trained volunteers in the vicinity of sudden cardiac arrest events in public spaces and to pinpoint the nearest automatic external defibrillator (AED). Price and his team are forming a foundation to extend the app to other smart phone platforms and provide support to other municipalities seeking to implement the technology.

“When I first learned of the great work by Chief Price and his team, I knew we needed to do everything we could to bring this application and its life-saving benefits to San Francisco,” said Herrera. “The kind of partnership we are building within city departments shows that even in challenging budget times, smart governments and engaged citizens can increase benefits to the community. Just as the state of California has been proactive to ensure that Good Samaritans are protected from civil liability when they assist in times of great need, I’m committed to ensuring that San Francisco is a place where all of us are confident to help each other. I am grateful to have the partnership and support from San Francisco Fire Chief Joanne Hayes-White on this initiative.”

Herrera also announced the launch of a new website, http://www.sffireapp.org, where interested San Franciscans can get information about CPR trainings and volunteer to assist with the initiative. Because the response in the first minutes of a sudden cardiac arrest are critical, the goal for the development launch is to increase the number of local volunteers with CPR training, to increase implementation and awareness of AEDs, and to work with Department of Emergency Management, Fire Department, and the local technology community to deliver the application to San Franciscans as soon as possible.

Bystander CPR and defibrillation combined are the most effective response to a person suffering from sudden cardiac arrest, and can greatly increase the likelihood of the victim’s survival rate. In 2010, the San Francisco Fire Department responded to 356 active cardiac arrest incidents and 39 patients survived to admittance to the hospital. One third of these incidents occurred in a public space, away from home.

“The San Francisco Fire Department is committed to spreading the word that bystander CPR is critical to increasing the odds of survival of a cardiac arrest event,” said Chief Hayes-White.  “In San Francisco, compared to other large cities, bystander CPR is initiated too infrequently. Our hope is that this initiative will provide our residents with the support they need to get trained in CPR and to get involved.”

In San Francisco, civic developers including representatives of Granicus and Firmstep have already volunteered to support development of the application and public access to AED maps.

“This app showcases the real power of mobile, real-time data delivery to connect people and save lives,” said Javier Muniz, CTO and co-founder of Granicus. “We’re excited to support the City & County of San Francisco and the San Ramon Valley Fire Protection District in whatever way we can to scale this app and empower citizens.”

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