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July 28, 2014 | by

San Diego County, City, Fire Partners Activate Life-saving CPR App

Technology Helps Citizens Become Heroes

NEWS RELEASE
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
July 28, 2014
Contacts: County: Michele Clock 619-531-4506
City: Lee Swanson 619-533-3780

Every minute a victim of sudden cardiac arrest waits for CPR, their chance of survival drops by up to 10 percent.

After four to six minutes, brain damage begins to occur.

After 10 minutes, it’s often too late. Few resuscitation attempts succeed.

Now PulsePoint, an innovative new smartphone application, lets citizens trained in CPR know when their help is needed, allowing them to step in during those critical moments before a paramedic arrives. It is now available in the San Diego region, thanks to the County and a coalition of local agencies.

County Supervisors Ron Roberts and Bill Horn, San Diego Mayor Kevin L. Faulconer, San Diego County Fire Chiefs’ Association President Dave Hanneman and other local fire and government officials on Monday announced the arrival of the cutting-edge technology at a news conference at San Diego Fire-Rescue Department’s Fire Station 1.

“Sudden cardiac arrest is a leading cause of death in our country, and just 8 percent of those who experience it survive,” Supervisor Ron Roberts said. “We can do better. This app can help us change these grim statistics.”

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The region is one of the largest in the U.S. to launch the app, which was developed by the Pleasanton, California-based nonprofit PulsePoint Foundation and distributed by Redmond, Washington-based emergency medical device company Physio-Control, Inc. San Diego joins the more than 500 localities around the nation that have begun using the app. Also available on Monday is compression-only CPR training from local ambulance providers Rural/Metro and American Medical Response.

“San Diego is again on health care’s leading edge by adopting this technology,” said Mayor Kevin L. Faulconer. “It is going to allow us as citizens to help one another in previously unimaginable ways. But it’s up to us to get trained, download this tool and use it.”

Mayor Kevin Faulconer

“Most of us have a friend or loved one who has suffered with a heart condition,” said Supervisor Bill Horn. “Sudden cardiac arrest can happen to one of those individuals, or out of the blue to any of us, at any time. You never know who or when you may be in the right place at the right time to help someone, thanks to this app.”

When a 9-1-1 call for sudden cardiac arrest comes in, an alert goes to the app at the same time first responders are dispatched. Citizens who are signed up for the app and nearby the incident are notified of the location of the victim as well as the closest publicly accessible AEDs.

How effective the app is in a community depends on citizen involvement. Get trained in CPR and sign up to receive the alerts. The American Red Cross, American Heart Association, and San Diego Project Heartbeat provide trainings throughout the year. You never know, you may just help save someone’s life! So please download the app through Google play or the Apple App store. Also available through PulsePoint is a companion app called PulsePoint AED, which allows the public to register the locations of publicly accessible AEDs in their community.

Cox Communications is supporting this program by airing this public service announcement (PSA) promoting the PulsePoint app on local cable channels. For more information, visit the County’s PulsePoint information page or to download the apps, visit PulsePoint.

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Spokane County PulsePoint Launch

April 13, 2014 | by

PulsePoint Increases Community Awareness of AEDs

SVFD ReenactmentYour chances of surviving a heart attack at Spokane Valley City Hall soon will improve.

After learning about a new effort that uses smartphones to alert CPR-trained volunteers to life-threatening emergencies nearby, city leaders decided to purchase a heart-jolting automated external defibrillator that paramedics say can dramatically improve chances of surviving sudden cardiac arrest.

The easy-to-use medical device, which cost about $1,250, is set to arrive in the next couple of weeks.

“I think we were kind of surprised when we realized there wasn’t one here,” said Deputy Mayor Arne Woodard.

The decision came after the City Council was told last month that Spokane-area fire departments are mapping the locations of AEDs in publicly accessible sites countywide.

The electronic map is part of a smartphone app called PulsePoint that’s linked to the county’s 911 system and alerts trained volunteers to emergencies at the same time that paramedics are being dispatched. The app guides volunteers to the location of the emergency and also shows whether any AEDs are nearby.

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It’s available for free in the Apple App Store or Android Apps on Google Play. Volunteers must register.

Once the city’s new AED arrives, City Hall will be added to the PulsePoint map.

So far, authorities have mapped 102 publicly accessible AEDs in Spokane Valley and they expect that number to climb rapidly over the next year because firefighters now will be asking business owners about the availability of the devices while doing annual site checks, said Fire Chief Bryan Collins.

The Spokane Fire Department and several rural fire protection districts also are mapping AED locations.

The app was developed in northern California where Collins worked before being hired in Spokane Valley.

On average, at least two people a day go into sudden cardiac arrest across Spokane County, said Collins, and chances of survival improve the quicker CPR or AED treatment is initiated.

The PulsePoint app uses smartphone GPS technology to determine whether any CPR volunteers are near the scene of an emergency and alerts them that help is needed. The goal is to get at least hands-only CPR initiated within the first three to five minutes of sudden cardiac arrest.

See the original article on The Spokesman-Review.

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April 20, 2012 | by

Nurse Barb’s Daily Dose: CPR Saves Lives

CPR TrainingDeedra Harrington, a nurse practitioner, was walking back to work after her lunch break when she noticed a man had collapsed in a nearby park. Though someone had called 911, there were lots of bystanders staring at the man. Deedra took a closer look and realized that his heart had stopped.

She performed CPR until the paramedics arrived and transported him to the nearby hospital. He had an immediate cardiac catheterization as 99% of one of his major coronary arteries was blocked.

Read the rest of this post on Nurse Barb’s Daily Dose Blog.

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