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June 18, 2014 | by

An App That Turns Everyday Bystanders Into Everyday Heroes

PulsePoint saves lives by improving the way we respond to those in distress.

Justin Sullivan/Getty ImagesWhen an airplane passenger is in physical distress, the flight attendant calls through the speakers asking if medical professionals are on board. It’s a simple action that can make a huge difference. What if we could mimic this same outreach, 10,000 feet below, everyday on the ground?

That’s exactly what the smart phone app PulsePoint (for download here) makes possible, according to Emergency Management. Using the gadgets we all carry every day, municipalities that use the free mobile service are able to send out alerts to CPR-certified citizens who are nearby someone in need. In many cases, there are just a few minutes between life and death, so every second counts. By quickening response times, this app can help save lives — before an ambulance is even in sight.

PulsePoint doesn’t replace dispatched responders, but as fast as ambulances and emergency medical technicians try to arrive, they’re often not quick enough. Once 9-1-1 is dialed and the available crew is actually with the patient, it can be too late – making those that can arrive quicker a vital resource.

San Jose became the first area city to use PulsePoint in 2012 — the app’s founder and CEO, Richard Price, is from the area, having worked as an ex-fire chief of the San Ramon Valley Fire Protection District. Since then, it’s caught on thanks to support from a local hospital and the results it provides. A local hospital is also planning a public registry of automated defibrillators through a new, related app, PulsePoint AED.

With decreasing local budgets for emergency response, increasing populations and traffic congestion, the demand for innovations like PulsePoint is greater than ever. By alerting off-duty first responders, medical professionals, and other CPR certified individuals of a nearby need, PulsePoint turns them into valuable lifesavers, all with the tap of a phone, making the app early — and effective — when time means everything.

View the full story by Harrison Potter at NationSwell.

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Anderson County Dispatcher

June 14, 2014 | by

Smartphone app aims to save lives in Anderson County

ANDERSON, SC (FOX Carolina) – The Anderson County Sheriff’s Office is using a new high-tech tool that aims to turn ordinary bystanders into life-saving heroes.

Dispatchers in the county will now start pushing information to a new smartphone app called PulsePoint, which is an app that alerts CPR-trained bystanders about a nearby emergency where they may be able to help.

FOX Carolina

“You know the difference early CPR and defibrillation can make in a sudden cardiac arrest event. Fifty-seven percent of U.S. adults say they’ve had CPR training, and most would be willing to use CPR or an AED to help save a stranger’s life. Yet only 11 percent say they’ve used CPR in an actual emergency. That’s a number we can increase together,” PulsePoint says on its website.

The company also makes an app to help people locate automated external defibrillators (AEDs) nearby during cardiac emergencies.

It allows users to report the locations of AEDs whenever they see them, and that information is then shared with emergency dispatchers, who can share their location with people trained in CPR and off-duty firefighters, nurses and other professionals.

View the full story by Joseph Pereira at FOX Carolina.

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June 12, 2014 | by

PulsePoint app turns bystanders into first responders

When it comes to helping a victim of cardiac arrest, it’s all about speed. PulsePoint, a life-saving mobile app, may not necessarily increase the speed at which first responders arrive, but it adds more legs to the race.

Santa Clara County agencies began using the PulsePoint app earlier this year with the goal of mobilizing CPR-trained residents and bystanders into becoming first responders.

The free app uses location-based technology to alert CPR-trained citizens if someone in their immediate area is experiencing sudden cardiac arrest. The alerted citizen can then choose to spring into action, find the victim and begin resuscitation until official emergency responders arrive.

“I can do an important job that the fire department can not do,” says PulsePoint Foundation president and app inventor Richard Price, adding that first responders “can’t get there in two minutes. I can sustain life until they arrive.”

Price, the former chief of the San Ramon Valley Fire Protection District, conceived the idea in 2009 after there was a cardiac arrest incident near him that he was unaware of and could not respond to. The idea came just as the smart phone revolution was gaining serious momentum.

“This idea to push a message to a phone is fairly new, and the ability for the phone to know where it’s at is still fairly new,” Price says.

Price adds that there are associated time costs that people forget about between the initial 911 call and paramedics arriving to assist. Call dispatchers have to take information, firefighters and paramedics need to scramble to their vehicles, and responders still need to get to the precise location of the victim.

All of this needs to happen in nine minutes, after which Price says there is a 92 percent chance of death.

“In these first few minutes, you can really make a difference,” Price says. “You just think about these minutes as a [baseball] score, and you don’t want to start in a deep hole. You don’t win many games when it’s 9-0 in the first inning.”

While the app is available to all CPR-trained individuals, the real target audience is off-duty firefighters, nurses and other life-saving professionals. However, Price adds that all CPR-trained individuals are valuable, and simply being aware of the app can stimulate awareness of CPR and trigger more discussion, especially for younger more tech-savvy residents.

View the full story by Matt Wilson at San Jose Mercury News.

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Portland Map on App

June 3, 2014 | by

Man reunites with firefighter who saved his life

PORTLAND, Ore. — It was a special reunion Tuesday morning for two men in Southeast Portland.

One is grateful to the other for saving his life, and it was all thanks to a phone app.

The meeting was the third for Drew Basse and Scott Brawner. Drew doesn’t remember the first time.
“I was not conscious at all,” he said. “I was completely incoherent.”

That was in a gym parking lot last month, he was having a heart attack.

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Scott performed CPR until rescue crews got there. But the off-duty firefighter and paramedic wouldn’t even have known Drew was in trouble if it wasn’t for the PulsePoint app on his phone.

Scott explained that an alarm goes off and, “If you do have a CPR call, then it will show the nearest location to that and help move the citizen responder to the closest position.”

He says you simple have to follow the dot on a map to find the person in trouble.

Drew knows Scott’s quick action and that app helped save his life.
“They need to make it make it mandatory on people’s phones. If you know CPR you should have the app on your phone.”

Anyone can download the PulsePoint app for free. You don’t even have to know CPR to have it. There’s a guide within the app and a timing to device to help you through “hands only CPR.”

View the newscast and full story by Mary Loos at KATU 2.

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PulsePoint AED

June 3, 2014 | by

PulsePoint App Aims To Get Emergency Care To Heart Attack Victims Quicker

An ingenious technology that’s saving lives in the Bay Area is now getting even more powerful. It’s a smartphone-based app that’s getting emergency care to heart attack victims much more quickly.

For ambulance crews, racing cardiac patients to the hospital is a life-saving routine. But often, it’s the first moments after a heart attack that make the difference.

“Success in the hospital for resuscitation is really dependent on rapid bystander CPR,” Chad Rammohan, M.D., said.

Rammohan is a director of the chest pain center at El Camino Hospital in Mountain View. Two years ago, the hospital helped launch a smartphone system designed to create an army of citizen CPR providers.

“And the best outcome is when there’s early defibrillation, meaning a defibrillator is available,” Rammohan said.

The system, known as PulsePoint was the brain child of former San Ramon Valley Fire Chief Richard Price.

When a cardiac call comes in to 911, the PulsePoint app can locate the closest trained responder via their smartphone and even help them perform CPR with an automated external defibrillator, known as an AED.

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“I’ll receive a tone on my phone and a map showing me exactly how to get where I am, to where the patient’s located,” says Price. “I’ve now arrived at the patient, so I’ve selected the CPR how to portion of the app.” he added.

Since being rolled out in Santa Clara County and the East Bay, the PulsePoint Foundation has expanded the system.

Beginning this year, the program now allows users to locate and mark the location of AEDs in schools and public buildings.

The goal is a powerful, searchable database that could locate the nearest defibrillator in an emergency. For photographer Brent Pederson the opportunity struck on a local tennis court, when he provided CPR to a player who’d collapsed with chest pain.

“So I just started pumping his chest and giving him mouth to mouth and we just kept it up for about 10 or 12 minutes until the medics arrived,” Pederson said.

Organizers are hoping the new features will help make the system even more powerful. Ultimately, stretching a life-saving safety net across the Bay Area.

View the newscast and full story by Eric Thomas at KGO-TV.

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Scott and Drew

June 3, 2014 | by

Smartphone app saves Milwaukie man’s life

CLACKAMAS, Ore. — A Milwaukie man believes a new smartphone app called PulsePoint saved his life when there were only minutes to spare.

May 9th seemed like a regular day for Drew Basse. The truck driver worked out at the 24-Hour Fitness on S.E. Sunnybrook Blvd. in Clackamas and then walked to his car.

Suddenly, he started feeling tired and light-headed. He doesn’t even remember what happened next: He had a massive heart attack.

“I was completely, completely gone,” Basse said as he talked to reporters from his bed at a rehabilitation center days later.

Luckily, a security guard had been watching and called Clackamas County 911, who sent out a PulsePoint alert. Off duty firefighter Scott Brawner was exercising inside the very same 24-Hour Fitness and his phone started buzzing.

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“When the app went off, I’d never heard it before. It turned my radio off and gave me a series of beeps,” Brawner said as he stood next to Basse’s hospital bed.

He had downloaded the app and checked the box that said he was willing to step in during an emergency nearby to give CPR.

The app brought up a GPS map with real-time locations of both men and that’s when Brawner saw the security guard kneeled down by Basse’s car door. He rushed over, saw that Basse, just seconds before, had a heart attack and he started doing hard and fast, hands-only CPR within one minute of the PulsePoint alert.

Paramedics came and Basse was brought back. He had surgery to install a pacemaker on his heart and will be recovering for the next six weeks. Doctors said he has no cognitive damage.

Both men are giving PulsePoint a lot of credit. “This PulsePoint app, it’s just a must,” Basse said. “It needs to get out to everybody, wherever people have a computer. They should make it mandatory on your phone.”

They also agree that it saved a life on May 9th.

“In a matter of minutes, somebody is there to save your life.” Basse said. “That’s what Scott did. He saved my life. I wouldn’t be here right now if it wasn’t for him.”

“I would love to see other people do the same thing,” Brawner said. “If you have the opportunity to do CPR, I mean just look at what we’ve given Drew back with everybody that’s helped him.”

Individual fire departments sign on to be a part of PulsePoint. It’s a non-profit and fairly new, so Clark County, Clackamas, and Tualatin Valley Fire and Rescue are the only local departments that have launched it at this time.

View the newscast and full story by Nina Mehlhaf at KGW.

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PulsePoint AED Logo

June 3, 2014 | by

PulsePoint Foundation and Physio-Control Launch App to Build Comprehensive Automated External Defibrillator (AED) Registry

PulsePoint AED Will Complement Lifesaving PulsePoint Respond App

(LAS VEGAS, Nevada) – June 3, 2014 – PulsePoint AED, a new mobile application designed to build a comprehensive registry of automated external defibrillators (AEDs) available for use during cardiac emergencies, was released today by the PulsePoint Foundation at the Emergency Cardiovascular Care Update (ECCU) 2014 Conference in Las Vegas, Nevada. The PulsePoint Foundation is a non-profit organization dedicated to providing mobile technologies to help everyday citizens save lives. Physio-Control, the leading provider of emergency medical response technologies worldwide, is the marketing and implementation partner of the Foundation.

When a cardiac emergency strikes, finding an automated external defibrillator (AED) can help save a life. But that takes knowing where AEDs are located. “The PulsePoint AED registry is one of the largest and fastest growing defibrillator databases in the world,” said Richard Price, president of the PulsePoint Foundation. “The new PulsePoint AED app strengthens the chain of survival for cardiac arrest victims by empowering CPR/AED-aware citizens to report up-to-date AED location information to local authorities and to make that information immediately available to dispatchers and trained bystanders nearby.”

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Once the location of AEDs enters the database via the PulsePoint AED app, all validated AED’s become visible in the PulsePoint Respond app, which means that AED information is provided to the local emergency communications center for instant display on dispatcher consoles during calls for assistance. This allows the dispatchers to direct callers to public AEDs near them during an emergency.

“PulsePoint AED is a great way for agencies to build comprehensive AED registries while involving local citizens. Users of PulsePoint and subscribing local emergency responders all get updated information about the AEDs in their communities,” said Cameron Pollock, Vice President of Marketing, Physio-Control, Inc. “With PulsePoint AED and PulsePoint Respond, citizens, responders and medical care providers can effectively work together in their communities to help save lives.”

“Keeping AED location information current is a significant challenge,” said Jeff Helm, Division Chief, Sioux Falls Fire Rescue in South Dakota. “PulsePoint AED will increase community awareness of AED locations and will simplify the task of discovering devices missing from our registry.” In 2012 Sioux Falls Fire Rescue received the Harvard University Kennedy School of Government Ash Institute’s Bright Ideas Award for their public access defibrillator (PAD) program.

“We are pleased to continue our partnership with the PulsePoint Foundation on another life-saving resource for our community,” said Tomi Ryba, president and chief executive officer of El Camino Hospital in California. “This week is National CPR and AED Awareness Week and the launch of the PulsePoint AED app is a great opportunity for our community to actively participate in identifying local AEDs and educating themselves about the life-saving potential of CPR and AEDs.”

PulsePoint AED is the second app created by the PulsePoint Foundation. PulsePoint Respond was launched in 2011 and empowers everyday citizens to provide lifesaving assistance to victims of sudden cardiac arrest. Last month in Portland, Oregon, off-duty firefighter Scott Brawner was working out at a local health club when he received an alert through PulsePoint Respond. Brawner responded and performed CPR until advanced care arrived. Alerts provided by the PulsePoint Respond app helped save the cardiac arrest victim’s life. The PulsePoint Respond app has been downloaded more than 200,000 times to date.

PulsePoint AED and PulsePoint Respond are available to the public free of charge for Apple iOS and Google Android devices from the Apple App Store and Google Play. Engineering for both applications is provided by volunteers at Workday, Inc. Public safety agencies interested in implementing PulsePoint may contact their local Physio-Control representative or call 800-442-1142.

About sudden cardiac arrest

SCA is a leading cause of death in the United States, accounting for an estimated 325,000 deaths each year/1,000 deaths per day. The American Heart Association estimates that effective bystander CPR, provided immediately after sudden cardiac arrest, can double or triple a person’s chance of survival. However, only about one quarter of SCA victims receive bystander CPR and even fewer receive a potentially lifesaving therapeutic shock from a public access AED. Improving bystander CPR rates and access to AEDs is critical to survival.

About Physio-Control

Physio-Control, Inc. is headquartered in Redmond, Washington. The company operates in over 100 countries and is the world’s leading provider of professional emergency medical response solutions that predict or intervene in life threatening emergencies. To learn more visit www.physio-control.com, or connect at www.facebook.com/physiocontrolinc, https://www.linkedin.com/company/physio-control-inc-or @PhysioControl

About the PulsePoint Foundation

PulsePoint is a 501(c)(3) non-profit foundation based in the San Francisco Bay Area. Its mission is to make it much easier for citizens who are trained in CPR to use their life saving skills to do just that…save lives! Through the use of modern, location-aware mobile devices PulsePoint is building applications that work with local public safety agencies to improve communications with citizens and empower them to help reduce the millions of annual deaths from sudden cardiac arrest. Learn more at www.pulsepoint.org or join the conversation at http://www.facebook.com/PulsePoint and @PulsePoint.

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Media Contact:

Matt Fikse, Tel: 425-867-4208, Email: matt.fikse@physio-control.com

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iPhone AED Photo

June 3, 2014 | by

El Camino Hospital Collaborates With PulsePoint Foundation To Launch Crowd-Sourced Automatic External Defibrillator (AED) Registry

Santa Clara County first in the nation to launch innovative AED app

MOUNTAIN VIEW, Calif., June 3, 2014 – Today, El Camino Hospital, in collaboration with the PulsePoint Foundation, announced the launch of the second PulsePoint mobile app, PulsePoint AED, which is designed to build the most comprehensive registry of public automated external defibrillators (AED) available for use during sudden cardiac emergencies. Santa Clara County is the first to roll out this new app, which is available for free download from the iTunes Store and Google Play.

In conjunction with the launch of the PulsePoint AED app, El Camino Hospital is hosting an AED Location Contest, where participants locate and submit unregistered AEDs in Santa Clara County using the PulsePoint AED app. The top three winners will each receive a prize, such as an iPad.

“We are pleased to continue our partnership with the PulsePoint Foundation on another life-saving resource for our community,” said Tomi Ryba, president and chief executive officer of El Camino Hospital. “This week is National CPR and AED Awareness Week and the launch of the AED app is a great opportunity for our community to actively participate in identifying local AEDs and educating themselves about the life-saving potential of CPR and AEDs.”

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“We are grateful for the ongoing support from El Camino Hospital and the PulsePoint Foundation in educating our community around the importance of CPR and AED use, “ said Chief Ken Kehmna, Santa Clara County Fire District. “This latest app is a vital resource in providing the most updated information on public AEDs to emergency first responders and CPR-trained citizen responders alike.”

The American Heart Association estimates that immediate cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) and early defibrillation with an AED can more than double a victim’s chance of survival. Yet, finding the nearest AED can be difficult at the time of a sudden cardiac emergency. The PulsePoint AED app enables users to report and update public AED locations simply by taking a photo of the AED using their iPhone or Android mobile phone and uploading the photo and location information to the registry. All validated information uploaded into the registry is also provided to the local emergency communications center for real-time display on dispatcher consoles during calls for assistance. Additionally, the app is integrated with the existing PulsePoint Respond CPR app, alerting CPR-trained citizen bystanders of the nearest AED location in the event of a sudden cardiac emergency.

For more information about the PulsePoint apps, please visit: www.elcaminohospital.org/CPRHelpNow

About El Camino Hospital
El Camino Hospital is an acute-care, 443-bed, nonprofit and locally governed organization with campuses in Mountain View and Los Gatos, Calif. In addition to state-of-the-art emergency departments, key medical specialties include behavioral health, cancer care, genomic medicine, heart and vascular, neuroscience, orthopedic and spine, senior health, urology, and the only Women’s Hospital in Northern California. The hospital is recognized as a national leader in the use of health information technology and wireless communications, and has been awarded the Gold Seal of Approval from The Joint Commission as a Primary Stroke Center as well as back-to-back ANCC Magnet Recognitions for Nursing Care.

To learn more, visit our website, find us on Facebook, follow us on Twitter, or view our videos on YouTube. For a physician referral, visit our website or call the El Camino Health Line at 800-216-5556.

About the PulsePoint Foundation
PulsePoint is a 501(c)(3) non-profit foundation based in the San Francisco Bay Area. Its mission is to make it much easier for citizens who are trained in CPR to use their life-saving skills to do just that…save lives! Through the use of modern, location-aware mobile devices PulsePoint is building applications that work with local public safety agencies to improve communications with citizens and empower them to help reduce the millions of annual deaths from sudden cardiac arrest. Learn more at www.pulsepoint.org. Follow the PulsePoint Foundation on Facebook and Twitter.

Media Contact:
Chris Ernst, 650-962-5853
chris.ernst@elcaminohospital.org

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Drew Basse and Scott Brawner

May 27, 2014 | by

PulsePoint App Saves Life of Cardiac Arrest Victim

Life-saving CPR performed after mobile app notifies nearby off-duty firefighter

CFD #1 LogoCLACKAMAS, Ore., May 28, 2014 – On Friday, May 9, 2014 off-duty firefighter Scott Brawner was working out at a local health club when he received an alert through PulsePoint, a 9-1-1 connected mobile app designed to alert CPR-trained citizens of Sudden Cardiac Arrest (SCA) emergencies in their proximity. This alert saved a man’s life.

Using the map presented by the PulsePoint app, Scott immediately made his way to the reported patient location. In less than a minute, Scott found the man unconscious in the parking lot outside of the health facility where a security guard had first found him unresponsive and called 9-1-1. Scott immediately assessed and began hands-only CPR. He continued providing chest compressions until paramedics from American Medical Response (AMR) and Clackamas Fire District #1 arrived to provide advanced care.

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“As a fire fighter I know that every minute that passes without a SCA victim receiving resuscitation, the chances of that person surviving decrease 10 percent.” said Scott Brawner, Firefighter/Paramedic with Tualatin Valley Fire & Rescue (TVF&R). “By adopting PulsePoint, agencies are removing much of the fate and luck in survival by involving CPR-trained citizen rescuers in cardiac arrest response.”

On Saturday, May 17, 2014, at Adventist Medical Center in Portland, Oregon, Scott had the opportunity to meet the man he had saved just a week prior. His name is Drew Basse, a 57-year-old truck driver from Milwaukie, Oregon. Scott also met Drew’s son Shane, 31, and daughter Staci, 27. It was an emotional meeting filled with gratitude and appreciation as Drew is expected to fully recover with no loss of cognitive function because CPR was administered so quickly. The family was especially interested in learning more about the “miracle app” they had heard played such a key role in Drew’s survival.

“This app saved my Dad’s life,” said Shane Basse, “We’re so grateful to the PulsePoint Foundation for creating this life-saving app, Scott Brawner for his heroic actions and Clackamas Fire for not only their quick response, but for adopting this technology.”

“The PulsePoint app did its job by alerting a Good Samaritan simultaneously with the dispatch of our crews, ” said Bill Conway, EMS Officer for Clackamas Fire District #1. “This incredibly positive outcome is why Clackamas Fire, like so many organizations throughout the U.S., invested in this type of technology.”

The app on Scott’s phone is from the non-profit PulsePoint Foundation. The app is designed to reduce collapse-to-CPR and collapse-to-defibrillation times by increasing citizen awareness of cardiac events beyond a traditional “witnessed” area and by displaying the precise location of nearby public access defibrillators (AEDs).

About the PulsePoint Foundation
PulsePoint is a 501(c)(3) non-profit foundation based in the San Francisco Bay Area. Its mission is to make it much easier for citizens who are trained in CPR to use their life-saving skills to do just that…save lives! Through the use of modern, location-aware mobile devices PulsePoint is building applications that work with local public safety agencies to improve communications with citizens and empower them to help reduce the millions of annual deaths from sudden cardiac arrest.

Deployment of the PulsePoint app can significantly strengthen the “chain of survival” by improving bystander response to SCA victims in public settings and increasing the chance that lifesaving steps will be taken prior to the arrival of emergency medical services (EMS) professionals. Just two years after launching outside the San Ramon Valley (CA) the PulsePoint app has been adopted in 600 cities and communities in 18 states.

PulsePoint is built and maintained by volunteer engineers at Workday, a Silicon Valley-based company that creates enterprise cloud applications, and distributed by Physio-Control. The original idea came from Richard Price, the former chief of the San Ramon Valley Fire Department who wanted to bridge the gap between the critical minutes following SCA and the 13 million Americans who are CPR trained, but often don’t know their skills are required.

The PulsePoint app is available for iPhone and Android and can be downloaded from the iTunes Store™ and Google Play™. Learn more at www.pulsepoint.org.

About Clackamas Fire District #1
Clackamas Fire District #1 provides fire, rescue, and emergency medical services to the cities of Milwaukie, Oregon City, Happy Valley, Johnson City and a portion of Damascus as well as the unincorporated areas of Oak Lodge, Clackamas, Westwood, Carver, Redland, Beavercreek, Carus, Clarkes, and South End/Central Point.

The District has 17 fire stations strategically located throughout Clackamas County with a workforce of more than 200 employees and 100 volunteers. It is the second largest fire protection district in Oregon serving over 179,000 citizens in an area covering nearly 200 square miles.

Clackamas Fire District #1 is a CFAI Accredited agency meeting the highest standards in emergency service delivery.

About TVF&R
Tualatin Valley Fire & Rescue provides fire protection and emergency medical services to approximately 454,000 citizens in one of the fastest growing regions in Oregon. The District’s 210 square mile service area includes the cities of Beaverton, Durham, King City, Rivergrove, Sherwood, Tigard, Tualatin, West Linn, and Wilsonville, and unincorporated portions of Clackamas, Multnomah, and Washington County. TVF&R is a CFAI Accredited agency.

About Cardiac Arrest
Out-of-hospital cardiac arrest is a leading cause of death in the United States, accounting for an estimated 424,000 deaths each year, more than 1,000 deaths per day. The American Heart Association estimates that effective bystander CPR, provided immediately after cardiac arrest, can double or triple a person’s chance of survival. However, less than half of cardiac arrest victims receive bystander CPR and even fewer receive a potentially lifesaving therapeutic shock from a public access AED. Improving bystander CPR rates and access to AEDs is critical to survival.

Different than a heart attack, sudden cardiac arrest is caused when the heart’s electrical system malfunctions and the heart stops working properly. For every minute that passes without a SCA victim receiving resuscitation, the chances of that person surviving decrease 10 percent. After 10 minutes the chances of survival are minimal.

Contacts
Interview Requests & National Media
Shannon Smith
ssmith@smithmediarelations.com
C: (773) 339-7513
O: (616) 724-4256

General Inquires & Portland-Area Media
Brandon Paxton
brandon.paxton@clackamasfire.com
C: (503) 519-4123
P: (503) 294-3555

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Rural/Metro FD

May 12, 2014 | by

Rural/Metro first in Arizona to use new emergency alert app

Rural/Metro FireWith a simple alert from your phone, you could help save a life.

“It means the community is now looking out for each other,” said Capt. Grant Cesarek with Rural Metro Fire, who says they are the first agency to start using PulsePoint.

PulsePoint is a free app for Android and iPhone, that tells you when emergency help is needed.

“Anyone that has their phone that’s been registered for the app and downloaded the app that’s within about 300 feet of a cardiac arrest event, would get a push notification and an alert that there’s a need for CPR,” said Cesarek.

Cesarek says the hope is that bystanders can start CPR before emergency crews arrive. The app will also walk someone through the steps of CPR if they don’t know how, and alert the user if there is an AED nearby to use as well.

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“If there’s a minute ahead of time before paramedics arrive then that’s a minute of good CPR and good blood flow and good circulation for that person,” he said.

The dispatch computers automatically send information to the app, so if Rural Metro gets a call and someone needs CPR, you get an alert.

“It’s all set up so that bystanders can be alerted and decide whether or not they want to help their own community members,” he said.

He says this technology will especially help in a near-drowning, where every second counts.

“There’s nothing wrong with us as firefighters and paramedics, showing up to a scene and CPR is started,” said Cesarek. “We say, ‘sir, ma’am, we’ll slide in,’ and then we take over from there.”

View the newscast and full story by Rikki Mitchell at KGUN9.

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