LA Times Logo

August 6, 2014 | by

LA County Fire Dept. cardiac arrest app to ‘crowd-source good Samaritans’

Hoping to turn regular cellphone-toting Angelenos into rapid responders, the Los Angeles County Fire Department has linked its dispatch system to a cellphone app that will notify CPR-trained good Samaritans when someone in a public place nearby is having a cardiac arrest.

The app, called PulsePoint, sends Fire Department alerts out to mobile phone users at the same time that dispatchers send the official message out to emergency crews — increasing the possibility that a cardiac arrest victim can get life-saving CPR from a bystander while medical responders are still on the way, department officials said Wednesday.

The program also provides cardiopulmonary resuscitation instructions and the location of defibrillators nearby.

“Every person who knows CPR, downloads this app and activates it has their own fire department radio in their pocket,” said Fire Department medical director Dr. Franklin Pratt. “They become the first first responder.”

Enlisting nearby citizens who are prepared to deliver “hands-only CPR” — hard and fast compressions in the center of the chest — could greatly improve survival rates among cardiac arrest sufferers, Los Angeles County fire officials said.

Fire Chief Daryl L. Osby, who was on hand for a press event in Inglewood debuting the system, told The Times that the average emergency crew response time for his department was 5 minutes countywide, and sometimes longer in lower-density, far-flung communities such as Lancaster and Palmdale.

“If a citizen can begin CPR before the paramedics arrive, it increases survival,” he said.

Full Story

Medical director Pratt said that when the heart stops beating, the opportunity for survival with a good quality of life diminishes after about 3 or 4 minutes because of injury to the brain and changes in the body that make the heart less responsive. But in the first couple of minutes after cardiac arrest there’s still oxygen in the blood, he added. Immediate CPR can keep that oxygen flowing to the brain.

View the full story by Eryn Brown at the Los Angeles Times.

Less Story
Los Angeles County Seal

August 6, 2014 | by

PulsePoint App Now Available to Los Angeles County

Mobile app empowers CPR-trained users and off-duty professionals to provide help immediately after cardiac arrest

Contact:
Captain Tom Richards
C: (213) 247-8524
O: (323) 881-2472

LOS ANGELES – August 6, 2014 – To aid cardiac arrest victims quickly, the Los Angeles County Fire Department, The PulsePoint Foundation and The Wireless Foundation are making the PulsePoint app available to individuals in the Los Angeles County area today. Aimed at average citizens and off-duty professionals trained in CPR, the app alerts registered users when a sudden cardiac arrest occurs in a public place in their immediate vicinity. Informed at the same time as emergency responders, users are given detailed instructions, including the location of automatic external defibrillators (AEDs) nearby.

More than 13,000 people in Los Angeles County have already downloaded the app, but local promotional campaigns are in development to help raise awareness among the County’s more than 4 million residents. The leading cause of death in the U.S., cardiac arrests outside hospitals are responsible for more than 1,000 deaths a day and 424,000 a year. Effective CPR administered immediately after a cardiac arrest can potentially double or triple the victim’s chance of survival, but less than half of victims receive that immediate help.

“Widespread deployment of the PulsePoint app can significantly strengthen the Chain of Survival by increasing the chance that lifesaving steps will be taken by CPR-trained individuals prior to the arrival of our personnel,” said Los Angeles County Fire Chief Daryl Osby. “Mobile technology can help us build a safer, more resilient community, and thanks to the donation by The Wireless Foundation, PulsePoint is available to Los Angeles County at no cost to our organization.”

Full Story

“This is a perfect example of the ‘connected life’ that provides enormous benefits for all thanks to this very simple concept, which is to alert CPR-trained individuals to a nearby cardiac arrest situation so they may assist until the professional responders arrive on the scene,” said Meredith Attwell Baker, President of The Wireless Foundation and President and CEO of CTIA-The Wireless Association. “If you’re CPR-trained, please download the PulsePoint app now to help save a life.”

In addition to the PulsePoint app, the Los Angeles County Fire Department will be launching PulsePoint AED app to help locate and record all public access defibrillators in the county for use during cardiac arrest emergencies. Once validated, these crowdsourced AED will be visible in the PulsePoint app as well as for dispatcher use during emergency calls. The PulsePoint apps are available for iPhone and Android and can be downloaded from the iTunes Store™ and Google Play™.

About the Los Angeles County Fire Department
Founded in 1923, the Los Angeles County Fire Department is an international leader of the fire service, and one of the largest emergency service agencies in the world. Each day, more than 900 emergency responders are on duty to provide fire protection, life safety and environmental protection services to more than four million residents and commercial businesses in Los Angeles County’s 2,296-square-mile area. When called into action following major international disasters, the Department’s Urban Search and Rescue Team responds around the globe as members of California Task Force 2. Once back in Los Angeles County, these same elite responders can be found at work in hometown neighborhoods in 58 cities and unincorporated areas. The Department proudly continues to be a frontrunner in firefighting technology, offering specialized training opportunities in Urban Search and Rescue, Emergency Medical Services, Hazardous Materials, Air Operations and Homeland Security. Behind the scenes, more than 800 dedicated business professionals help carry out the mission. Learn more at www.fire.lacounty.gov.

About the PulsePoint Foundation
PulsePoint is a 501(c)(3) non-profit foundation based in the San Francisco Bay Area. Its mission is to make it much easier for citizens who are trained in CPR to use their life-saving skills to do just that…save lives! Through the use of modern, location-aware mobile devices PulsePoint is building applications that work with local public safety agencies to improve communications with citizens and empower them to help reduce the millions of annual deaths from sudden cardiac arrest. Deployment of the PulsePoint app can significantly strengthen the “chain of survival” by improving bystander response to SCA victims in public settings and increasing the chance that lifesaving steps will be taken prior to the arrival of emergency medical services (EMS) professionals. PulsePoint is built and maintained by volunteer engineers at Workday and distributed by Physio-Control of Redmond, WA. The original idea came from Richard Price, the former chief of the San Ramon Valley Fire Department, who wanted to bridge the gap between the critical minutes following SCA and the 13 million Americans who are CPR trained, but often don’t know their skills are required. Learn more at www.pulsepoint.org or join the conversation at www.facebook.com/PulsePoint and @PulsePoint.

About The Wireless Foundation
The Wireless Foundation is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit dedicated to developing and supporting initiatives that use wireless technology to help American communities. The Foundation’s innovative programs benefit consumers in areas such as education, healthcare, safety and the environment. The Foundation was formed by CTIA-The Wireless Association® member companies in 1991. Learn more at www.wirelessfoundation.org.

###

Less Story
Los Angeles County Seal

August 5, 2014 | by

Los Angeles County Launches Pulsepoint CPR “Citizen Responder” Mobile App

Press Conference August 6, 2014, 10 A.M.

Home Depot, 3363 W. Century Boulevard, Inglewood

 

Contact: Contact: Contact:
Fire Inspector Rick Flores Amy Storey Shannon Smith
Los Angeles County Fire Department The Wireless Foundation PulsePoint Foundation
213-200-1829 202-736-3207 616-724-4256
rflores@fire.lacounty.gov astorey@ctia.org ssmith@smithmediarelations.com

 

WHAT: Los Angeles County is launching PulsePoint, a free mobile app that alerts registered users whenever a cardiac arrest occurs in a public place in their immediate vicinity. Informed at the same time as emergency responders, bystanders are given detailed instructions, including the location of the nearest automatic external defibrillator (AED), and can begin hands-only CPR until responders arrive. County officials will join PulsePoint Founder Richard Price and The Wireless Foundation to talk about how this mobile technology will aid cardiac arrest victims quickly and will improve survivability in Los Angeles County.

PulsePoint Demonstration: Following all remarks, a live narrated demonstration of how the PulsePoint app works will take place. A “victim” will experience a sudden cardiac arrest in the parking lot adjacent to the press conference podium. A “Good Samaritan” trained in CPR will receive a phone alert while inside the Home Depot and will run out to provide chest compressions while responders are dispatched. Los Angeles County Fire Station 173 personnel will arrive to simulate patient care and transport.

WHEN: Wednesday, August 6, 2014, 10 A.M

WHO:

  • Los Angeles County Second District Supervisor Mark Ridley-Thomas
  • Los Angeles County Fire Chief Daryl L. Osby
  • Dr. Franklin Pratt, Medical Director, Los Angeles County Fire Department
  • Athena Polydorou, Executive Director, The Wireless Foundation
  • Richard Price, Founder and President of the PulsePoint Foundation
  • Danny Gutierrez and Roslyn De La Torre, Bystander CPR Good Samaritans
  • Sudden Cardiac Arrest Victim Elbert Kirby, along with his wife Wanda Kirby

*Note: Fire Inspector Rick Flores will be available for Spanish language interviews.
A sign language interpreter will also be present.

WHERE: Home Depot Store, 3363 W. Century Boulevard, Inglewood

WHY: Survivability rates for sudden cardiac arrest are less than 8% nationwide and approximately 6% in Los Angeles County. Every two minutes, someone dies from sudden cardiac arrest. Survivability depends greatly on receiving immediate CPR. PulsePoint will provide immediate notification to those nearby who can provide chest compressions to double or triple a victim’s chance of survival. Learn CPR. Get the App. Save a Life.

VISUALS:

  • 40-foot PulsePoint promotional banner draped between two Los Angeles County Fire Department ladder trucks behind speaker area
  • A live, narrated demonstration of how PulsePoint works
  • Hands-Only CPR training booth featuring customized LACoFD CPR training kits
  • A Public Service Announcement video will be provided at the event (thumb drive)

Check-In, Refreshments:
A media check-in table will be provided.
Refreshments provided by Company 77 Pizza, courtesy of The Wireless Foundation.

We Thank Our Partners:
Special thanks to The Wireless Foundation, the PulsePoint Foundation, and Physio-Control for their generous partnership in launching this lifesaving app in Los Angeles County.

Press Conference Host:
Battalion Chief Anderson Mackey, LACoFD Public Affairs

Learn CPR.  Get the App.  Save a Life.

#PulsePointLA

Web: Social Media:
www.fire.lacounty.gov www.facebook.com/LACoFD
www.pulsepoint.org www.twitter.com/LAC0_FD
www.wirelessfoundation.org www.youtube.com/user/LosAngelesCountyFD
Full Story
NationSwell Logo

June 18, 2014 | by

An App That Turns Everyday Bystanders Into Everyday Heroes

PulsePoint saves lives by improving the way we respond to those in distress.

Justin Sullivan/Getty ImagesWhen an airplane passenger is in physical distress, the flight attendant calls through the speakers asking if medical professionals are on board. It’s a simple action that can make a huge difference. What if we could mimic this same outreach, 10,000 feet below, everyday on the ground?

That’s exactly what the smart phone app PulsePoint (for download here) makes possible, according to Emergency Management. Using the gadgets we all carry every day, municipalities that use the free mobile service are able to send out alerts to CPR-certified citizens who are nearby someone in need. In many cases, there are just a few minutes between life and death, so every second counts. By quickening response times, this app can help save lives — before an ambulance is even in sight.

PulsePoint doesn’t replace dispatched responders, but as fast as ambulances and emergency medical technicians try to arrive, they’re often not quick enough. Once 9-1-1 is dialed and the available crew is actually with the patient, it can be too late – making those that can arrive quicker a vital resource.

San Jose became the first area city to use PulsePoint in 2012 — the app’s founder and CEO, Richard Price, is from the area, having worked as an ex-fire chief of the San Ramon Valley Fire Protection District. Since then, it’s caught on thanks to support from a local hospital and the results it provides. A local hospital is also planning a public registry of automated defibrillators through a new, related app, PulsePoint AED.

Full Story

With decreasing local budgets for emergency response, increasing populations and traffic congestion, the demand for innovations like PulsePoint is greater than ever. By alerting off-duty first responders, medical professionals, and other CPR certified individuals of a nearby need, PulsePoint turns them into valuable lifesavers, all with the tap of a phone, making the app early — and effective — when time means everything.

View the full story by Harrison Potter at NationSwell.

Less Story
Anderson County Dispatcher

June 14, 2014 | by

Smartphone app aims to save lives in Anderson County

ANDERSON, SC (FOX Carolina) – The Anderson County Sheriff’s Office is using a new high-tech tool that aims to turn ordinary bystanders into life-saving heroes.

Dispatchers in the county will now start pushing information to a new smartphone app called PulsePoint, which is an app that alerts CPR-trained bystanders about a nearby emergency where they may be able to help.

FOX Carolina

“You know the difference early CPR and defibrillation can make in a sudden cardiac arrest event. Fifty-seven percent of U.S. adults say they’ve had CPR training, and most would be willing to use CPR or an AED to help save a stranger’s life. Yet only 11 percent say they’ve used CPR in an actual emergency. That’s a number we can increase together,” PulsePoint says on its website.

The company also makes an app to help people locate automated external defibrillators (AEDs) nearby during cardiac emergencies.

It allows users to report the locations of AEDs whenever they see them, and that information is then shared with emergency dispatchers, who can share their location with people trained in CPR and off-duty firefighters, nurses and other professionals.

View the full story by Joseph Pereira at FOX Carolina.

Full Story
SJ Mercury News Logo

June 12, 2014 | by

PulsePoint app turns bystanders into first responders

When it comes to helping a victim of cardiac arrest, it’s all about speed. PulsePoint, a life-saving mobile app, may not necessarily increase the speed at which first responders arrive, but it adds more legs to the race.

Santa Clara County agencies began using the PulsePoint app earlier this year with the goal of mobilizing CPR-trained residents and bystanders into becoming first responders.

The free app uses location-based technology to alert CPR-trained citizens if someone in their immediate area is experiencing sudden cardiac arrest. The alerted citizen can then choose to spring into action, find the victim and begin resuscitation until official emergency responders arrive.

“I can do an important job that the fire department can not do,” says PulsePoint Foundation president and app inventor Richard Price, adding that first responders “can’t get there in two minutes. I can sustain life until they arrive.”

Price, the former chief of the San Ramon Valley Fire Protection District, conceived the idea in 2009 after there was a cardiac arrest incident near him that he was unaware of and could not respond to. The idea came just as the smart phone revolution was gaining serious momentum.

Full Story

“This idea to push a message to a phone is fairly new, and the ability for the phone to know where it’s at is still fairly new,” Price says.

Price adds that there are associated time costs that people forget about between the initial 911 call and paramedics arriving to assist. Call dispatchers have to take information, firefighters and paramedics need to scramble to their vehicles, and responders still need to get to the precise location of the victim.

All of this needs to happen in nine minutes, after which Price says there is a 92 percent chance of death.

“In these first few minutes, you can really make a difference,” Price says. “You just think about these minutes as a [baseball] score, and you don’t want to start in a deep hole. You don’t win many games when it’s 9-0 in the first inning.”

While the app is available to all CPR-trained individuals, the real target audience is off-duty firefighters, nurses and other life-saving professionals. However, Price adds that all CPR-trained individuals are valuable, and simply being aware of the app can stimulate awareness of CPR and trigger more discussion, especially for younger more tech-savvy residents.

View the full story by Matt Wilson at San Jose Mercury News.

Less Story
Portland Map on App

June 3, 2014 | by

Man reunites with firefighter who saved his life

PORTLAND, Ore. — It was a special reunion Tuesday morning for two men in Southeast Portland.

One is grateful to the other for saving his life, and it was all thanks to a phone app.

The meeting was the third for Drew Basse and Scott Brawner. Drew doesn’t remember the first time.
“I was not conscious at all,” he said. “I was completely incoherent.”

That was in a gym parking lot last month, he was having a heart attack.

Full Story

Scott performed CPR until rescue crews got there. But the off-duty firefighter and paramedic wouldn’t even have known Drew was in trouble if it wasn’t for the PulsePoint app on his phone.

Scott explained that an alarm goes off and, “If you do have a CPR call, then it will show the nearest location to that and help move the citizen responder to the closest position.”

He says you simple have to follow the dot on a map to find the person in trouble.

Drew knows Scott’s quick action and that app helped save his life.
“They need to make it make it mandatory on people’s phones. If you know CPR you should have the app on your phone.”

Anyone can download the PulsePoint app for free. You don’t even have to know CPR to have it. There’s a guide within the app and a timing to device to help you through “hands only CPR.”

View the newscast and full story by Mary Loos at KATU 2.

Less Story
PulsePoint AED

June 3, 2014 | by

PulsePoint App Aims To Get Emergency Care To Heart Attack Victims Quicker

An ingenious technology that’s saving lives in the Bay Area is now getting even more powerful. It’s a smartphone-based app that’s getting emergency care to heart attack victims much more quickly.

For ambulance crews, racing cardiac patients to the hospital is a life-saving routine. But often, it’s the first moments after a heart attack that make the difference.

“Success in the hospital for resuscitation is really dependent on rapid bystander CPR,” Chad Rammohan, M.D., said.

Rammohan is a director of the chest pain center at El Camino Hospital in Mountain View. Two years ago, the hospital helped launch a smartphone system designed to create an army of citizen CPR providers.

“And the best outcome is when there’s early defibrillation, meaning a defibrillator is available,” Rammohan said.

The system, known as PulsePoint was the brain child of former San Ramon Valley Fire Chief Richard Price.

When a cardiac call comes in to 911, the PulsePoint app can locate the closest trained responder via their smartphone and even help them perform CPR with an automated external defibrillator, known as an AED.

Full Story

“I’ll receive a tone on my phone and a map showing me exactly how to get where I am, to where the patient’s located,” says Price. “I’ve now arrived at the patient, so I’ve selected the CPR how to portion of the app.” he added.

Since being rolled out in Santa Clara County and the East Bay, the PulsePoint Foundation has expanded the system.

Beginning this year, the program now allows users to locate and mark the location of AEDs in schools and public buildings.

The goal is a powerful, searchable database that could locate the nearest defibrillator in an emergency. For photographer Brent Pederson the opportunity struck on a local tennis court, when he provided CPR to a player who’d collapsed with chest pain.

“So I just started pumping his chest and giving him mouth to mouth and we just kept it up for about 10 or 12 minutes until the medics arrived,” Pederson said.

Organizers are hoping the new features will help make the system even more powerful. Ultimately, stretching a life-saving safety net across the Bay Area.

View the newscast and full story by Eric Thomas at KGO-TV.

Less Story
Scott and Drew

June 3, 2014 | by

Smartphone app saves Milwaukie man’s life

CLACKAMAS, Ore. — A Milwaukie man believes a new smartphone app called PulsePoint saved his life when there were only minutes to spare.

May 9th seemed like a regular day for Drew Basse. The truck driver worked out at the 24-Hour Fitness on S.E. Sunnybrook Blvd. in Clackamas and then walked to his car.

Suddenly, he started feeling tired and light-headed. He doesn’t even remember what happened next: He had a massive heart attack.

“I was completely, completely gone,” Basse said as he talked to reporters from his bed at a rehabilitation center days later.

Luckily, a security guard had been watching and called Clackamas County 911, who sent out a PulsePoint alert. Off duty firefighter Scott Brawner was exercising inside the very same 24-Hour Fitness and his phone started buzzing.

Full Story

“When the app went off, I’d never heard it before. It turned my radio off and gave me a series of beeps,” Brawner said as he stood next to Basse’s hospital bed.

He had downloaded the app and checked the box that said he was willing to step in during an emergency nearby to give CPR.

The app brought up a GPS map with real-time locations of both men and that’s when Brawner saw the security guard kneeled down by Basse’s car door. He rushed over, saw that Basse, just seconds before, had a heart attack and he started doing hard and fast, hands-only CPR within one minute of the PulsePoint alert.

Paramedics came and Basse was brought back. He had surgery to install a pacemaker on his heart and will be recovering for the next six weeks. Doctors said he has no cognitive damage.

Both men are giving PulsePoint a lot of credit. “This PulsePoint app, it’s just a must,” Basse said. “It needs to get out to everybody, wherever people have a computer. They should make it mandatory on your phone.”

They also agree that it saved a life on May 9th.

“In a matter of minutes, somebody is there to save your life.” Basse said. “That’s what Scott did. He saved my life. I wouldn’t be here right now if it wasn’t for him.”

“I would love to see other people do the same thing,” Brawner said. “If you have the opportunity to do CPR, I mean just look at what we’ve given Drew back with everybody that’s helped him.”

Individual fire departments sign on to be a part of PulsePoint. It’s a non-profit and fairly new, so Clark County, Clackamas, and Tualatin Valley Fire and Rescue are the only local departments that have launched it at this time.

View the newscast and full story by Nina Mehlhaf at KGW.

Less Story