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July 23, 2014 | by

Be More Than a Bystander

With the help of an awesome app, this firefighter saved a stranger’s life—and you could do the same

every-day-heroes-article-Brawner-400pxJust past 7:15 a.m. on May 9, off-duty firefighter Scott Brawner was working out to Pandora on the treadmill at his local 24-Hour Fitness in Clackamas, Oregon, when he received a series of alerts, overriding the music, on his iPhone.

The notification came from PulsePoint, a new 911-connected mobile app designed to let him, and up to 10 other CPR-trained citizens in the area, know that someone nearby was suffering Sudden Cardiac Arrest (SCA) and needed assistance ASAP. A map suddenly popped up on his screen, and within less than a minute, he found the unconscious man, 57-year-old Drew Basse, in the gym parking lot.

“As soon as I got outside, I noticed a security guard looking upset. I ran over to him, and that’s where I found Mr. Basse, sitting in his car with the door wide open. He had no pulse and he was not breathing,” says Brawner, 53, a veteran firefighter and paramedic with Tualatin Valley Fire & Rescue, Oregon’s second-largest fire department.

“It looked like it had just happened; he still had some bubbly spit around his mouth. So I grabbed him by his arms and pulled him out of his car,” says Brawner, who notes it wasn’t easy to move the approximately 265-pound Basse. He immediately started chest compressions at a rate of over 100 per minute while waiting for the ambulance, which the security guard had called earlier and is the reason Brawner had received the smartphone alert.

When paramedics arrived within 5 minutes, they were able to quickly get Basse breathing with a pulse again. But they were only successful at reviving Basse because of Brawner’s life-saving efforts.

Four days later, Brawner visited the hospital to check in on Basse and meet his family. “I’ve had a lot of people live throughout my career, but I’ve never had that one-on-one connection with somebody. I’m really happy how well that app worked. It allowed me to find him so fast,” says Brawner, who represents the first big success story for this new technology that was the brainchild of Richard Price, the former chief of California’s San Ramon Valley Fire Department, who wanted to connect the 13 million Americans who are CPR-trained with people who need their immediate help.

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“It’s pretty remarkable,” says Brawner, still in awe. “If I had taken a minute longer to get to him, he would have not survived.” Basse now has an implantable defibrillator in his chest and is expected to have a full recovery. He returned home from the rehab facility last week and will eventually go back to work as a truck driver. And Brawner and Basse have plans to go golfing this month.

View the full story by Chistina Goyanes at Men’s Health.

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Scott Brawner Alert

June 6, 2014 | by

A CPR App Is Saving Lives One Text at a Time

Calling 9-1-1 triggers a life-saving chain of events from a free smartphone app.

In May of this year, cardiac arrest struck Drew Basse, a 57-year-old truck driver in Clackamas, Ore., too suddenly for him to even call for help.

“I remember sitting down in my car and the dome light being on — then I was completely knocked out,” Basse said. He didn’t even have time to call 9-1-1. But a passing security guard did, starting a life-saving chain of events involving a free smartphone app called PulsePoint.

The security guard’s 9-1-1 call automatically sent a message to PulsePoint, and a text message alert went out from the app saying that someone needed CPR.

Scott Brawner, an off-duty firefighter from Tualatin Valley Fire & Rescue in Canby, Ore., happened to be on a treadmill at a nearby 24-hour fitness center when he got the app alert on his iPhone, telling him where someone was in need of CPR.

Brawner was surprised when the app kicked in, he said. “I was listening to Pandora — it turned off the radio, made a tone, and showed a map and AED location,” he said. “I had never seen the place before and I ran right to it.” On the way, Brawner could see where he was going on his iPhone map.

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He found Basse alone in his car sitting bolt upright. The security guard was there and shaken up, said Brawner, and he didn’t know CPR.

“I wasn’t even breathing when Scott Brawner found me,” said Basse.

“I pulled Drew out of the driver’s seat, laid him on the ground, and started CPR. I did a few hundred cycles of hands-only CPR — 100 beats per minute, compressions only. Then the ambulance and fire department came and I moved aside. It’s a little bit of a blur,” said Brawner.

The firefighter found out about the PulsePoint smartphone CPR alert system at the fire department he worked about a year ago. “During the roll-out I thought it would be great to put on my phone, and my wife downloaded it too. She’s also trained in CPR,” Brawner said. “I’ve been a paramedic for 34 years and have never seen anything like it,” he said about the app, which works on both iOS and Android devices.

While the American Heart Association reports that 9 out of 10 of the 359,400 people who went into cardiac arrest outside of a hospital in 2013 died, Basse’s case turned out differently.

View the full story by Jennifer J. Brown at Everyday Health.

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Drew in Wheelchair

June 4, 2014 | by

Heart Attack Rescue? There’s an App for That

A new smartphone app that aims to turn ordinary bystanders into heart attack heroes did just that last month, saving the life of a 57-year-old truck driver from Portland, Oregon, who had collapsed outside a gym.

Drew Basse is the first high-profile rescue attributed to PulsePoint, a free mobile app that alerts users when someone is in cardiac arrest nearby.

“Without people like Scott Brawner, I wouldn’t have had a second chance,” said Basse, referring to the off-duty local firefighter who answered the PulsePoint ping.

Basse, a father of two and grandfather to four, is recovering in a Portland rehabilitation center after the May 9 incident that Brawner said was the highlight of his 34-year career.

“I can’t believe that it worked,” said Brawner, 52, of Tualatin, Oregon. “It was just awesome. It still gives me chills.”

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Created on a shoestring budget by Richard Price, a former San Ramon, California, fire chief who didn’t want to miss an emergency call, PulsePoint has gained slow traction since 2009, rolling out to 911 dispatch centers that now cover some 600 U.S. cities.

“We’ve found that people are very willing to put their hand up and say, ‘I’ll help,’” said Price. More than 140,000 people have signed up for PulsePoint so far and more than 7,300 have responded to nearly 2,300 alerts.

Every year in the U.S. there are about 360,000 out-of-hospital cardiac arrests, or about 1,000 a day. Experts who research the problem say PulsePoint may be one way to boost the ranks of those who can perform bystander CPR, which doubles or triples the chances of surviving.

“It’s a great use of technology to enlist the aid of people who are willing and able to help save lives from cardiac arrest,” said Dr. Michael Sayre, an emergency medicine doctor with the University of Washington in Seattle and an leader in resuscitation medicine.

In Basse’s case, he was saved by Brawner, who happened to be working out at the same gym. Brawner’s fire district signed up for PulsePoint about a year ago.

But even he wasn’t expecting the alert that showed up on his phone as he walked on the treadmill, telling him that someone needed CPR, or cardiopulmonary resuscitation, right away. He saw a map, an icon of where he was, an icon showing the closet AED or automated external defibrillator — and an icon showing a victim. He quickly ran down two flights of stairs.

“I saw a security guard standing in the parking structure and it just didn’t look right to me,” Brawner said. “That’s where Drew Basse was. He was literally sitting in his car, unconscious, not breathing, no pulse.”

In fact, Brawner thought he looked like a “fresh code,” firefighter slang for someone who is already dead.

Brawner pulled Basse out of his car and started performing CPR. Within minutes, emergency crews arrived and took over, but the time that Brawner kept Basse’s blood pumping was crucial, doctors said.

That’s just what PulsePoint founder Price, 52, had in mind. He was a veteran of 32 years as a firefighter and fire chief, focused on improving bystander CPR and rapid response.

He was at lunch one day when he heard sirens and saw a fire truck pull right up to the business next door. “I wasn’t even aware of it,” he said. “I was actually in uniform. I had an AED in my car. We just weren’t plugged into those types of calls.”

Using technical skill gleaned from years of operating dispatch centers, Price worked with engineering interns from Northern Kentucky University to develop the app. Now, it’s updated and maintained by the firm Workday, which provides technical services for free.

View the full story by JoNel Aleccia at NBC News.

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Portland Map on App

June 3, 2014 | by

Man reunites with firefighter who saved his life

PORTLAND, Ore. — It was a special reunion Tuesday morning for two men in Southeast Portland.

One is grateful to the other for saving his life, and it was all thanks to a phone app.

The meeting was the third for Drew Basse and Scott Brawner. Drew doesn’t remember the first time.
“I was not conscious at all,” he said. “I was completely incoherent.”

That was in a gym parking lot last month, he was having a heart attack.

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Scott performed CPR until rescue crews got there. But the off-duty firefighter and paramedic wouldn’t even have known Drew was in trouble if it wasn’t for the PulsePoint app on his phone.

Scott explained that an alarm goes off and, “If you do have a CPR call, then it will show the nearest location to that and help move the citizen responder to the closest position.”

He says you simple have to follow the dot on a map to find the person in trouble.

Drew knows Scott’s quick action and that app helped save his life.
“They need to make it make it mandatory on people’s phones. If you know CPR you should have the app on your phone.”

Anyone can download the PulsePoint app for free. You don’t even have to know CPR to have it. There’s a guide within the app and a timing to device to help you through “hands only CPR.”

View the newscast and full story by Mary Loos at KATU 2.

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Scott and Drew

June 3, 2014 | by

Smartphone app saves Milwaukie man’s life

CLACKAMAS, Ore. — A Milwaukie man believes a new smartphone app called PulsePoint saved his life when there were only minutes to spare.

May 9th seemed like a regular day for Drew Basse. The truck driver worked out at the 24-Hour Fitness on S.E. Sunnybrook Blvd. in Clackamas and then walked to his car.

Suddenly, he started feeling tired and light-headed. He doesn’t even remember what happened next: He had a massive heart attack.

“I was completely, completely gone,” Basse said as he talked to reporters from his bed at a rehabilitation center days later.

Luckily, a security guard had been watching and called Clackamas County 911, who sent out a PulsePoint alert. Off duty firefighter Scott Brawner was exercising inside the very same 24-Hour Fitness and his phone started buzzing.

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“When the app went off, I’d never heard it before. It turned my radio off and gave me a series of beeps,” Brawner said as he stood next to Basse’s hospital bed.

He had downloaded the app and checked the box that said he was willing to step in during an emergency nearby to give CPR.

The app brought up a GPS map with real-time locations of both men and that’s when Brawner saw the security guard kneeled down by Basse’s car door. He rushed over, saw that Basse, just seconds before, had a heart attack and he started doing hard and fast, hands-only CPR within one minute of the PulsePoint alert.

Paramedics came and Basse was brought back. He had surgery to install a pacemaker on his heart and will be recovering for the next six weeks. Doctors said he has no cognitive damage.

Both men are giving PulsePoint a lot of credit. “This PulsePoint app, it’s just a must,” Basse said. “It needs to get out to everybody, wherever people have a computer. They should make it mandatory on your phone.”

They also agree that it saved a life on May 9th.

“In a matter of minutes, somebody is there to save your life.” Basse said. “That’s what Scott did. He saved my life. I wouldn’t be here right now if it wasn’t for him.”

“I would love to see other people do the same thing,” Brawner said. “If you have the opportunity to do CPR, I mean just look at what we’ve given Drew back with everybody that’s helped him.”

Individual fire departments sign on to be a part of PulsePoint. It’s a non-profit and fairly new, so Clark County, Clackamas, and Tualatin Valley Fire and Rescue are the only local departments that have launched it at this time.

View the newscast and full story by Nina Mehlhaf at KGW.

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