November 14, 2013 | by

CNBC Innovation Cities: The Rise of Health Apps

CNBC Innovation CitiesWhether it’s apps that tell us how far we’ve walked or run, or how many calories are in our meals, today’s technology is helping us keep tabs on how healthy we’ve become – or how much we’ve fallen behind.

One such app, PulsePoint, can be used to help save a life. “PulsePoint is a mobile application that alerts citizens who are CPR-trained of nearby cardiac arrests so they can get CPR started while the crews are still en route,” Richard Price, President of the PulsePoint Foundation, said in a report for CNBC’s Innovation Cities.

Using cloud technology, the app connects with local emergency communication centers of emergency services signed up to the program. When a cardiac arrest takes place in a nearby public space, subscribers in areas covered by the app – which is currently available in over 350 communities across 14 states in the U.S. – are notified with a push notification and an alert tone on their phone, followed by a map showing the precise location of the emergency.

Sudden Cardiac arrests account for roughly 325,000 deaths per year in the U.S. Today, 75,000 people have PulsePoint on their phones, although it is impossible to verify how many users are CPR trained.

A former fire chief in California, the inspiration for the app came to Price in an unusual place. “The original idea came from an incident where I was having lunch in a deli and was surprised by a crew arriving to a cardiac arrest that was happening right next door that I wasn’t aware of,” Price said. “We knew that all that time the crew was traveling to the scene we could have CPR in progress sooner,” he added.

While PulsePoint is helping save lives, motor company Ford has developed technology to help those who suffer from allergies. Ford’s SYNC system, which allows drivers to change radio stations and check the weather with simple voice commands, is now enabling users to stay healthy with the Allergy Alert App, developed by IMS Health.

Watch the video segment by Anmar Frangoul on CNBC.com

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November 9, 2013 | by

Heart Health Demystified with Mobile Tech

iPad ECGAccounting for 600,000 deaths per year, heart disease is the leading cause of death for men and women in the United States. With the help of technology, however, you can monitor your diet, track workouts and make lifestyle changes to help decrease the risk of heart disease.

First, use technology to keep track of important vitals that can affect your heart health. The Heart Health 2 app allows you to record your blood pressure, cholesterol, blood glucose levels, pulse and other stats. Not only can you have a better idea of these factors, but you can share this information with your doctors to help them better evaluate your needs.

Exercise is key to a healthy heart, and today’s apps make it possible to track your activity and your heart rate. The Withings Pulse Activity Tracker, for example, offers an app that lets you monitor activity levels, food intake, heart rate and sleep quality from your mobile device anytime day or night. You can also use the American Heart Association’s Walking Paths app to find new routes and track your daily walks.

Read the full post by Karen Schulz at the Verizon Wireless News Center.

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