October 10, 2012 | by

Transforming Government Through Location Intelligence

Map with PinWhen location data is coupled with existing government data and expertise, every point on the map can provide historical and predictive perspective to inform complex policy decisions. The map itself has been transformed from a static picture to a living platform for shared decision making and real-time collaboration, focusing the energy of the crowd and empowering government and citizens to work together to respond quickly to challenges at any scale. Thinking about service delivery through the lens of location-based technologies can help agencies make smarter decisions about investments in physical infrastructure.

In some ways, this future has already arrived. For someone suffering from cardiac arrest, minutes can mean the difference between life and death, and emergency medical crews can’t always get there immediately. PulsePoint is a mobile app that connects heart attack-related 911 calls with individuals nearby who are certified in CPR to provide immediate assistance until an ambulance can arrive.

Read the full GovLab Study on transforming government through location intelligence by Deloitte Consulting, LLC.

GovLab is a think tank in the Federal practice of Deloitte Consulting LLP that focuses on innovation in the public sector.

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May 30, 2012 | by

Enabling Citizen Heroes

This article is reprinted with permission from EMS Insider

Add a mobile app to your CPR program

EMS InsiderWhen it comes to cardiac arrests, a few well-known facts exist: Time is muscle; the window of opportunity to save a patient whose heart has stopped is excruciatingly small; and getting responders who know CPR to the patient as soon as possible provides the best chance for survival. The third fact was brought home to San Ramon Valley (Calif.) Fire Protection District (SRVFPD) Fire Chief Richard Price during lunch one day. While he was eating at a local deli, he heard sirens in the distance. Then he watched as the engine eventually stopped in front of the restaurant. Because he does not receive pages for medical emergencies, he was unaware that someone had collapsed in cardiac arrest just next door. Had he known, he could have been there in seconds to start CPR and use the AED in his vehicle before the crews arrived. This incident gave Price an idea. With the current cell phone technology and GPS, there must be a way to alert staff who may be in the area of a cardiac arrest, he thought. “It was very conceptual at that time. The idea grew out of that,” Price says. The “idea” evolved into a CPR mobile app for the iPhone and Android, that eventually became known as PulsePoint. Price expanded on his original idea to include citizens trained in CPR, who have indicated they’re willing to assist in case of an emergency. The app uses the GPS feature on the phone to locate citizens who have signed up for the program and are in the vicinity of a cardiac arrest patient. Notifications are sent only if the victim is in a public place and only to potential rescuers within walking distance of the emergency. The application also directs rescuers to the exact location of the closest AED. “We crowd source good Samaritans,” Price says. Price knew he needed help to develop the mobile app, so the district partnered with interns from the College of Informatics at Northern Kentucky University. While they worked out the technical details, Price attended to other issues. Initially, some concern was expressed about sending too many rescuers to what can often be a chaotic scene. However, Price says that this seldom happens. “We can always make the notification circle smaller, if we get to that problem,” he says. Even in the limited cases where extra rescuers respond, it hasn’t been an issue, Price says. On one occasion, a person suffered a cardiac arrest at a coffee shop and a large number of rescuers responded. But instead of causing confusion or getting in the way, they did a good job assigning tasks, and those who weren’t directly involved in the rescue attempt helped by clapping to the beat of the chest compressions.

Privacy issues
Price notes that the chain of survival depends on training people in CPR and sending them out into their communities to respond when needed. “The app doesn’t really change that very much. It just takes some of the fate out of it,” he says. Still, certain privacy precautions had to be considered. To protect the rescuer’s information, the app doesn’t know the identity of the responders—it simply locates a “device” by accessing the unique identification number, which is required for the PulsePoint server to locate and send alert messages to a specific device. Price says the app doesn’t access any other information on the responder’s device. “No personal information is ever collected or retained,” he says. Because the activation occurs within an exceptionally limited radius—within walking distance—the app only alerts people to emergencies in their immediate vicinity. “It makes you more aware of what’s happening nearby you,” he says. He says they were also careful to consider possible Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) violations when designing the app. No patient information is ever broadcast or known by PulsePoint. Because PulsePoint doesn’t know who responded, the citizen rescuers are not informed of outcomes. “Occasionally circumstances allow the citizen rescuers to come together with survivors, but it’s a careful, respectful process,” Price says. The issue only becomes problematic if there’s an infectious disease concern.

Where’s the AED?
The biggest hurdle for a seamless citizen CPR response is locating public AEDs. Price says that the district has done a good job of promoting the use of AEDs, but locating them and ensuring they’re properly maintained has been a challenge. “When you’re dispatching people to them, the standard is higher,” he says. “You need to know one is there.” Despite a vigorous awareness program in San Ramon Valley, the use rates of AEDs among citizens are low. Price believes the area for which emergency responders should commit additional resources. “AEDs need to rise to the importance of fire extinguishers,” he says. Some communities are starting to include AED location information in their computer-aided design (CAD) system so dispatchers can provide not only CPR instructions, but also the location of a nearby AED.

PulsePoint foundation
Once the district developed the app, they wanted to share it—and not just with their neighbors. “We want to be around the globe,” Price says. To do so, they created the PulsePoint Foundation, a 501(c)3 nonprofit organization that provides and supports the app free of charge. Supporting services are also provided at no charge to public safety agencies that offer the CPR app in their community. However, charges from the CAD system vendor may occur, which interface with the app. The foundation is working with the CAD vendors to moderate these costs. Currently, the PulsePoint Foundation is working with more than 150 organizations in the deployment of the app.

Community outreach
To launch a successful CPR mobile app program, community outreach is critical. Price recommends a multi-pronged marketing program to encourage citizen awareness and ongoing involvement. The district started with a public service announcement in movie theaters and other venues to raise awareness of both the app and the importance of citizen CPR. SRVFPD used university interns to help develop the PSA. “It was a low-cost way to create tremendous
value,” Price says. The district spent very little public money, and the students received real-world experience. “It gave meaning to their studies,” Price says. “It’s a win-win.” The district continues to promote CPR at all community events, and is working to provide CPR training to all seventh graders in the local school district. It also established a program to manage the maintenance of the approximately 200 public AEDs in the community. “We know where every single one is and have hands on them every six months,” Price says.

Upgrades added
A number of upgrades have been added to the program since the original application launched. A streaming radio function allows citizens to listen to emergency calls anywhere in the world. Most recently, a Twitter feature began broadcasting PulsePoint app CPR activations in real time. The tweet includes the time of activation, the general location and the number of citizen rescuers notified. The goal is to increase awareness of the app and the role it plays in saving lives. The Twitter feed can be found at @1000livesaday, a reference to the number of people who die daily in the U.S. from sudden cardiac arrest. Price says the number of activations is around one per day. On average, 3-4 citizens respond per incident. “I’ve seen as many as 22,” he says. The next release of the app will include a survey tool sent one hour after app users were notified of a need for CPR. The goal is to collect data on the responses to the notifications and create a clearer picture of what happens during the response before the professionals arrive. It will attempt to find out whether a person responded to the notification and if not, why. If they did respond, they’ll be asked whether they performed CPR, if an AED was available, and if so, whether it was used. The optional survey will continue to allow the citizen responder to remain anonymous, if desired. Price says the survey is being developed by Bentley J. Bobrow, MD, medical director of the Bureau of Emergency Services Arizona Department of Health Services; and Steven C. Brooks, MD, MHSc FRCPC, emergency physician and scientist at Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre and assistant professor at the University of Toronto.

Summary
Because CPR has been around for 50 years, Price says sometimes it can be hard to find something exciting about it. But the process of developing the app and sharing it with others has been just that. “We were right at the time in history when it was all possible. Six months earlier, and it would not have been possible,” he says. Through this process, SRVFPD learned something about human beings that they probably already knew—people really want to help others. “This is a way, at no cost, you can make a significant difference in [out-of-hospital cardiac arrest] survivability,” Price says. “Think about the force multiplier—it’s a huge deal.” However, he warns, the app isn’t a panacea. “It works best in systems that are already good,” he says. That means good citizen CPR programs, an active AED strategy and a strong activation policy for ST-elevation myocardial infarction patients. “It ties a lot of things together and makes good systems pay off bigger,” he says. Although good work can often go unrewarded, this isn’t the case for Price. In February, the Danville Area Chamber of Commerce and the San Ramon Valley Times named Price “Citizen of the Year” for his innovative efforts to protect the lives of the citizens in his jurisdiction and beyond.

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February 14, 2012 | by

New Mobile Phone App to Help Save Lives Announced by San José Fire Department and El Camino Hospital

SJFD LogoSAN JOSE, Calif. – A free CPR “citizen responder” mobile phone application will help save lives through a new partnership between the San José Fire Department and El Camino Hospital.

The PulsePoint app enables members of the public to provide life-saving assistance to victims of sudden cardiac arrest, which causes nearly 1,000 deaths a day in the United States. San José is the nation’s largest city to utilize PulsePoint’s location-aware technology. The app is available for both the iPhone and Android smart phones.

“The first few minutes after a sudden cardiac arrest are critical for saving lives, and this app will help citizens provide immediate assistance,” said San José Mayor Chuck Reed. “Technology can help us build a safer, stronger and healthier community, and our partnership with El Camino Hospital to bring PulsePoint to San José is a wonderful example of this commitment at no cost to us.”

App users, who have indicated they are trained in CPR, can be notified if someone nearby is having a cardiac emergency and may require CPR. The app uses sophisticated location-based services to alert citizens in a public place of the need for CPR. The application also directs citizen rescuers to the exact location of the nearest publicly available automated external defibrillator (AED).

The PulsePoint app will be made available to additional communities in Santa Clara County over the next year.

“We’re making it very easy to empower citizens of San Jose who can help with CPR when every second counts,” said San José Fire Chief William McDonald. “Timing is crucial for saving a life during cardiac arrest, and a notification to someone close by who can perform CPR can make all the difference.”

The City of San José has installed 190 AEDs in libraries, community centers and other public locations. The City has also installed 40 AEDs at the San Jose International Airport so victims of cardiac arrest can have a greater chance of survival.

El Camino Hospital Logo“Bringing this leading-edge lifesaving tool to the residents of San José is part of our ongoing commitment to improve the health and well being of our community,” said Tomi Ryba, president and CEO of El Camino Hospital. “We encourage everyone to become trained in CPR in order to extend the benefits of this mobile application and save lives.”

“Once a sudden cardiac arrest begins, chances of that person surviving decrease 10 percent for every minute that passes without resuscitation; after 10 minutes there is little chance for successful resuscitation,” said Chad Rammohan, MD, FACC, medical director of the Chest Pain Center at El Camino Hospital. “Citizen responders can help stop the clock by starting CPR immediately and help increase the individual’s chances for survival until paramedics arrive. Recent advances in hospital management including cooling or therapeutic hypothermia have made a significant difference in meaningful recovery.”

While difficult to quantify how many lives have been saved from bystander intervention since CPR was developed by the American Heart Association in 1960, the stories of people like sudden cardiac arrest survivor Theresa Doede underscore the important role that everyday individuals trained in CPR can play.

“I survived an out-of-hospital sudden cardiac arrest while attending a Christmas party on December 11, 2010,” said Ms. Doede. “I have no brain injury due to a willing bystander beginning CPR within moments of my collapse.”

The PulsePoint app is available for download free at both the Apple iPhone App Store and in the Android Market.

The PulsePoint app also provides a virtual window into select 911 emergency communication centers giving users of mobile devices real-time access to emergency activity as it is occurring. Users are able to view active incidents, including the current response status of dispatched units, and instantly pinpoint incident location on an interactive map. Users also can choose to be notified of incidents by type when they are dispatched and monitor emergency radio traffic via this modern version of the traditional fire scanner.

The PulsePoint app has received several international awards, including the International Association of Fire Chiefs 2011 Fire Service Award for Excellence, a CTIA-The Wireless Association 2011 VITA Wireless Samaritan Award, a 2011 Computerworld Honors Program Laureate Award for Innovation, an American Heart Association Life Saver Heart Partner Award, and an IADAS Webby Official Honoree award for the Best Use of GPS or Location Technology. Additional information about the PulsePoint app can be found at www.pulsepoint.org.

About Sudden Cardiac Death
Sudden cardiac arrest occurs when the heart suddenly stops beating, resulting in no blood flow to the brain and other vital organs. Approximately 300,000 out-of-hospital cardiac arrests occur each year in the United States, with a median reported survival-to-hospital-discharge rate of 8 percent.

Rapidly implementing the “chain of survival” model can help increase the chances of survival from sudden cardiac arrest. The steps in the chain include activation of emergency medical services by calling 9-1-1, starting CPR, using an AED and acquiring appropriate care.

About the San José Fire Department
The San José Fire Department is committed to excellence in public safety. It embraces innovative approaches to meet the evolving needs of the diverse city of San José and works in partnership with the community to achieve a fire and hazard safe environment. The San José Fire Department consists of 650 authorized sworn personnel, 44 non-sworn uniformed Fire Communication Dispatchers, and 57 civilian personnel. It protects 206 square miles and approximately 1.2 million residents. Its mission is to serve the community by protecting life, property, and the environment through prevention and response. More information can be found at www.sjfd.org

About El Camino Hospital
El Camino Hospital is an acute-care, 542-bed, not-for-profit and locally governed organization with campuses in Mountain View and Los Gatos, Calif. In addition to state-of-the-art emergency departments, key medical specialties include heart and vascular, cancer care, urology, orthopedic and spine, neuroscience, genomic medicine, and the only Women’s Hospital in Northern California. The hospital is recognized as a national leader in the use of health information technology and wireless communications, and has been awarded the Gold Seal of Approval from The Joint Commission as a Primary Stroke Center as well as back-to-back ANCC Magnet Recognitions for Nursing Care. More information can be found at www.elcaminohospital.org.

About PulsePoint
PulsePoint is a non-profit foundation based in the San Francisco Bay Area whose goal is to make it much easier for citizens who are trained in CPR to use their life-saving skills to save lives. Through the use of modern, location-aware mobile devices, PulsePoint is building applications that work with local fire departments, EMS agencies and police departments to improve communications with citizens and empower them to help reduce the estimated 1 million worldwide annual deaths from sudden cardiac arrest. More information about PulsePoint can be found at www.pulsepoint.org.

Contacts
Captain Mary Gutierrez
Public Information Officer
Office (408) 794-6959
Cell (408) 398-9228
sjfdpio@sanjoseca.gov

Chris Ernst
El Camino Hospital
Office (650) 962-5853
chris.ernst@elcaminohospital.org

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