Spokane County PulsePoint Launch

April 13, 2014 | by

PulsePoint Increases Community Awareness of AEDs

SVFD ReenactmentYour chances of surviving a heart attack at Spokane Valley City Hall soon will improve.

After learning about a new effort that uses smartphones to alert CPR-trained volunteers to life-threatening emergencies nearby, city leaders decided to purchase a heart-jolting automated external defibrillator that paramedics say can dramatically improve chances of surviving sudden cardiac arrest.

The easy-to-use medical device, which cost about $1,250, is set to arrive in the next couple of weeks.

“I think we were kind of surprised when we realized there wasn’t one here,” said Deputy Mayor Arne Woodard.

The decision came after the City Council was told last month that Spokane-area fire departments are mapping the locations of AEDs in publicly accessible sites countywide.

The electronic map is part of a smartphone app called PulsePoint that’s linked to the county’s 911 system and alerts trained volunteers to emergencies at the same time that paramedics are being dispatched. The app guides volunteers to the location of the emergency and also shows whether any AEDs are nearby.

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It’s available for free in the Apple App Store or Android Apps on Google Play. Volunteers must register.

Once the city’s new AED arrives, City Hall will be added to the PulsePoint map.

So far, authorities have mapped 102 publicly accessible AEDs in Spokane Valley and they expect that number to climb rapidly over the next year because firefighters now will be asking business owners about the availability of the devices while doing annual site checks, said Fire Chief Bryan Collins.

The Spokane Fire Department and several rural fire protection districts also are mapping AED locations.

The app was developed in northern California where Collins worked before being hired in Spokane Valley.

On average, at least two people a day go into sudden cardiac arrest across Spokane County, said Collins, and chances of survival improve the quicker CPR or AED treatment is initiated.

The PulsePoint app uses smartphone GPS technology to determine whether any CPR volunteers are near the scene of an emergency and alerts them that help is needed. The goal is to get at least hands-only CPR initiated within the first three to five minutes of sudden cardiac arrest.

See the original article on The Spokesman-Review.

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February 16, 2014 | by

Apps That Could Save Your Life

Technology is making it easy for strangers to save the day or even for you to keep the kiddos from catching the crud. You’re already carrying a medical device and it’s a smartphone full of life-saving apps.

First, turning everyday citizens into superheroes, the PulsePoint App notifies CPR Certified users if someone nearby, is having a cardiac emergency. The app also pinpoints the nearest defibrillator. Without one, the chances of survival for cardiac patients, decreases 10 percent each minute. The PulsePoint App is free

Next, Sleep Apnea Treatment Centers of America’s SnoreOMeter gives you information you can use to shame your significant other, but it can also help diagnose a serious underlying issue. Record your snore for up to 30 seconds, including any lapses in breathing, then rate the decibel level. The SnoreOMeter compares your snore to a jackhammer or a blow dryer. You can even put your friends to sleep when you share the results on Facebook. This app is also free.

And, the flu is no joke! Tracking hot zones is easy with the Sickweather App. It scours social media for posts with key words like ‘flu’ and ‘sick’, then lets you know when you’re approaching Sick Town. You can download Sickweather for free in the app store.

Trouble viewing video? Try this link to the original story.

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November 14, 2013 | by

CNBC Innovation Cities: The Rise of Health Apps

CNBC Innovation CitiesWhether it’s apps that tell us how far we’ve walked or run, or how many calories are in our meals, today’s technology is helping us keep tabs on how healthy we’ve become – or how much we’ve fallen behind.

One such app, PulsePoint, can be used to help save a life. “PulsePoint is a mobile application that alerts citizens who are CPR-trained of nearby cardiac arrests so they can get CPR started while the crews are still en route,” Richard Price, President of the PulsePoint Foundation, said in a report for CNBC’s Innovation Cities.

Using cloud technology, the app connects with local emergency communication centers of emergency services signed up to the program. When a cardiac arrest takes place in a nearby public space, subscribers in areas covered by the app – which is currently available in over 350 communities across 14 states in the U.S. – are notified with a push notification and an alert tone on their phone, followed by a map showing the precise location of the emergency.

Sudden Cardiac arrests account for roughly 325,000 deaths per year in the U.S. Today, 75,000 people have PulsePoint on their phones, although it is impossible to verify how many users are CPR trained.

A former fire chief in California, the inspiration for the app came to Price in an unusual place. “The original idea came from an incident where I was having lunch in a deli and was surprised by a crew arriving to a cardiac arrest that was happening right next door that I wasn’t aware of,” Price said. “We knew that all that time the crew was traveling to the scene we could have CPR in progress sooner,” he added.

While PulsePoint is helping save lives, motor company Ford has developed technology to help those who suffer from allergies. Ford’s SYNC system, which allows drivers to change radio stations and check the weather with simple voice commands, is now enabling users to stay healthy with the Allergy Alert App, developed by IMS Health.

Watch the video segment by Anmar Frangoul on CNBC.com

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