July 17, 2017 | by

International Association of Fire Chiefs and PulsePoint Foundation Announce Global Strategic Partnership to Increase Cardiac Arrest Survival Rates

Collaboration aims to increase awareness and use of PulsePoint and expand the role of fire and emergency services in emerging digital trends.

Fairfax, VA (July 17, 2017) — The International Association of Fire Chiefs (IAFC) and the PulsePoint Foundation (PulsePoint) today announced a strategic partnership to reinforce the use of mobile phones and apps to connect nearby CPR-trained citizens and off-duty professional rescuers with people in cardiac arrest. The collaboration also endeavors to develop strategies for utilizing public safety data in new and innovative ways. The alliance will be highlighted at Fire-Rescue International, the annual conference and expo of the IAFC being held in Charlotte, NC, July 26-29, 2017.

The PulsePoint app connects directly to local emergency communication centers. When an incident requiring CPR and an AED (Automated External Defibrillator) is reported, nearby citizens and off-duty responders who carry the app receive a notification of the emergency simultaneously with traditional first responders. PulsePoint reduces collapse-to-CPR times by increasing awareness of cardiac arrest events beyond a traditional “witnessed” area. The system also aims to reduce collapse-to-defibrillation times through augmented awareness of AED locations.

“As a past fire chief and longtime member of the IAFC, I’m very familiar with the leadership this organization provides the industry,” said Richard Price, President of the California-based 501(c)(3) nonprofit PulsePoint Foundation. “PulsePoint is using mobile technology to save lives and is pioneering uses of public safety data that until recently were unimaginable. This partnership will explore future data uses and develop strategies to help make public safety agencies more effective and impactful in their communities.”

Each year, approximately 350,000 cardiac arrests occur outside a hospital setting in the United States. Nearly 90 percent of these events prove fatal, and the chance of survival decreases by ten percent with every passing minute without CPR.

Chief John Sinclair

“The IAFC considers the deployment of PulsePoint to be a best practice in fire and EMS and we look forward to helping our member agencies implement the technology. Recognizing the excruciatingly short window of opportunity to intervene during cardiac arrest, we need to reinforce the importance of improving the utilization of CPR-trained community members and off-duty personnel,” said John Sinclair, President of the IAFC and Fire Chief of Kittitas Valley (Wash.) Fire and Rescue.

Chief Tom Jenkins

Thomas Jenkins, IAFC First Vice President and Fire Chief of Rogers (Ark.) Fire Department emphasized the importance of PulsePoint to his community: “In Rogers, we have seen PulsePoint bring together the best of citizenship, technology, and medical care to save lives from cardiac arrest.”

Chief Billy Goldfeder
Chief Billy Goldfeder

“In addition to its flagship capability of summoning CPR assistance, the PulsePoint app displays other emergency activity occurring in the community. For on duty crews this can significantly improve situational awareness and confirm the real-time communication center connection to the public,” said Deputy Chief Billy Goldfeder, International Director of the IAFC Safety, Health and Survival Section. “This makes the app much more interesting and engaging for citizens and off-duty personnel—ultimately increasing the size of the network available for cardiac arrest response.”

Chief Mike Duyck
Chief Mike Duyck

As part of the IAFC collaboration, PulsePoint has also partnered with the Western Fire Chiefs Association (WFCA) to increase awareness of the application and its lifesaving benefits. According to Mike Duyck, WFCA Director and Fire Chief of Tualatin Valley (Ore.) Fire & Rescue, “TVF&R was the first fire department in Oregon to launch the PulsePoint app for citizen responders and over the past four years we have witnessed firsthand its ability to save lives. We are now the first agency to pilot the professional version of the app, Verified Responder, which based on results to date, may mark the beginning of a national initiative with the help of the IAFC. Having lost my own father from sudden cardiac arrest, I am personally and professionally committed to sparing other families from potential heartbreak.”

About the International Association of Fire Chiefs (IAFC)
The IAFC represents the leadership of firefighters and emergency responders worldwide. IAFC members are the world’s leading experts in firefighting, emergency medical services, terrorism response, hazardous materials spills, natural disasters, search and rescue, and public safety legislation. Since 1873, the IAFC has provided a forum for its members to exchange ideas, develop professionally and uncover the latest products and services available to first responders.

About the PulsePoint Foundation
PulsePoint is a 501(c)(3) non-profit foundation based in the San Francisco Bay Area. Through the use of location-aware mobile devices, PulsePoint is building applications that work with local public safety agencies to improve communications with citizens and off-duty personnel, empowering them to help reduce the millions of annual deaths from sudden cardiac arrest. Learn more at pulsepoint.org or join the conversation at Facebook and Twitter. The free app is available for download on iTunes and Google Play.

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Media Contacts
Jim Philipps
jphilipps@iafc.org
(703) 537-4829

Shannon Smith
shannon@pulsepoint.org
(773) 339-7513

Source: IAFC Press Release

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February 14, 2017 | by

Pilot Program Leverages Off-Duty Professional Firefighters, Technology and Defibrillators to Save Lives

Each year, approximately 350,000 cardiac arrests occur outside a hospital setting in the United States. Nearly 90 percent of these events prove fatal, and the chance of survival decreases by ten percent with every passing minute without CPR.*

Though survival rates in the Northwest exceed the national average, a coalition of professional first responders, clinicians, researchers and a leading medical equipment manufacturer aim to make the region the frontrunner in cardiac arrest response and survival.

The PulsePoint Foundation, Tualatin Valley Fire & Rescue, International Association of Firefighters Local 1660 and automatic external defibrillator (AED) manufacturer Philips Healthcare have partnered to launch the Verified Responder Pilot Program that will activate off-duty professional firefighters to respond to cardiac arrest calls in public and private settings. Participating professional firefighters are also certified emergency medical technicians or paramedics who receive background checks in the state of Oregon.

Philips Healthcare is loaning every participating firefighter an AED so that if they respond, they can employ the same technology that is used by emergency medical responders and physicians to restart a heart that has stopped beating. The effort will gather important data from the pilot and combine it with existing technology and clinical insights to inform future lifesaving strategies and products. During the pilot, King County EMS (WA) will be assisting in programmatic evaluation for potential expansion to additional communities. King County currently leads the nation in survival rates for cardiac arrest victims.

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Quotes from participating organizations in Verified Responder Pilot Program:

PulsePoint Foundation
“In the way PulsePoint Respond has engaged citizens to respond to public cardiac arrests, the Verified Responder Pilot Program could fundamentally change how off-duty first responders are utilized during time-critical emergencies occurring in private locations. First responders typically see one-third of personnel on-duty while two-thirds are off-duty. By automatically notifying nearby off-duty professionals when dispatching first responders, the potential to save lives on incidents such as cardiac arrest increases significantly.”

“Firefighters know all too well that their skills are sometimes needed when off-the-clock. In some ways, PulsePoint Verified Responder simply formalizes the ‘always in service’ dedication and full time commitment that comes with the badge. The PulsePoint Foundation salutes the TVF&R firefighters for their leadership in this pilot program and for their strengthened pledge of around-the-clock service to the community.”
– Richard Price, president and founder of the PulsePoint Foundation

Philips Healthcare
“Despite the widespread availability of AEDs today, people are not always aware of them and don’t know how easy they are to use. People may still hesitate to intervene when someone is experiencing a sudden cardiac arrest. We understand that the moments between someone’s heart stopping and when the emergency responders get to the scene are crucial, and we are grateful for the opportunity to be part of this important pilot program. The faster help is able to intervene, the greater opportunity for another life saved.”
-Joe Sovak, General Manager, Emergency Care and Resuscitation, Philips.

King County EMS
“This program has great potential to save lives. If demonstrated effective it will serve as a model for the rest of the nation.”
-Mickey Eisenberg, MD, PhD, Director of Medical QI, King County EMS

“In resuscitation, rescuers are literally snatching life from the jaws of death. This challenge is great and we need to take advantage of innovative ideas if we are to save more lives from cardiac arrest. The Verified Responder program is a remarkable community project – the first of its kind in the US – that brings together the best of public service, technology, and medical care to save lives from cardiac arrest. The program may transform the way we approach this leading cause of death and provide a new and effective strategy for resuscitation.”
-Tom Rea, MD, Medical Program Director, King County EMS

Tualatin Valley Fire & Rescue
“Sudden cardiac arrest remains a major killer in the United States. Although survival has improved in some communities, there is large geographic variation across the country with survival rates ranging from 1% to 20%. Two of the key links in the American Heart Association’s “Chain of Survival” are early CPR and timely defibrillation. The PulsePoint Verified Responder program addresses both of these needs in communities that are trying to improve their survival. TVFR has been actively involved in ways to improve survival from SCA and was the first fire agency to introduce Pulse Point in Oregon. Our line personnel are dedicated to reversing the tragedy of SCA which often strikes its victims without any warning. We are honored to be part of this pilot effort that has the potential to improve survival rates dramatically in the United States.”
-Mohamud Daya, MD, EMS Medical Director for Tualatin Valley Fire & Rescue and Washington County

Consolidated Communications Agency (9-1-1)
“Four years ago, we were the first fire department in Oregon to launch PulsePoint’s app for citizen responders. We are humbled to partner with them again as the first agency to pilot the Verified Responder program and hope that it’s the beginning of a national movement. Having lost my own father from sudden cardiac arrest, I am personally and professionally committed to sparing other families from potential heartbreak.”
-Fire Chief Mike Duyck, Tualatin Valley Fire & Rescue.

About the PulsePoint Foundation
PulsePoint is a 501(c)(3) non-profit foundation based in the San Francisco Bay Area. Through the use of location aware mobile devices, PulsePoint is building applications that work with local public safety agencies to improve communications with citizens, empowering them to help reduce the millions of annual deaths from sudden cardiac arrest (SCA). Deployment of the PulsePoint app can significantly strengthen the “chain of survival” by improving bystander response to cardiac arrest victims and increasing the chance that lifesaving steps will be taken prior to the arrival of emergency medical services (EMS). PulsePoint is built and maintained by volunteer engineers at Workday and CTIA Wireless Foundation is a key sponsor and advocate of PulsePoint, providing industry and financial support. Learn more at www.pulsepoint.org or join the conversation at Facebook and Twitter. The free app is available for download on iTunes and Google Play.

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Source: Tualatin Valley Fire & Rescue

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February 1, 2013 | by

Will you answer the CPR call?

TIMES PHOTO: JONATHAN HOUSE - Tualatin Valley Fire & Rescue Fire Chief Mike Duyck Tualatin Valley Fire & Rescue wants to know if you are willing to help save a life.

Specifically, if you are willing to serve as a potential citizen rescuer on standby — ready to jump into action and perform CPR in the event someone nearby goes into sudden cardiac arrest in a public place.

The fire district on Tuesday released a new PulsePoint smartphone application that alerts CPR-trained bystanders when someone within a quarter-mile radius is in need of their aid at the precise moment emergency dispatchers activate TVF&R’s emergency crews.

The app can be downloaded free from the Apple App Store or Android Apps on Google Play.

As the first fire department in Oregon to introduce this lifesaving tool to its 220-square-mile service area, the app uses sophisticated location-based software when someone calls 911 to direct bystanders to the location of the person in need of CPR as well as the nearest accessible automated external defibrillator.

Once the citizen rescuer arrives, an emergency dispatcher on the phone with the witness who called 911 will provide instruction on how to administer hands-only CPR by pushing hard and fast on the center of the patient’s chest. Meanwhile, the rescuer can inform someone else about where to find the nearest AED.

“We can’t stress enough how critical it is for people to start CPR before we arrive,” said Mark Charleston, TVF&R’s emergency medical services battalion chief. “Every minute a person in sudden cardiac arrest goes without CPR or a shock to the heart from an AED, the chance of survival goes down by 10 percent.

“Our crews are running about three to four minutes to arrive on scene once they are dispatched. If someone starts performing CPR, it ensures we have a viable patient and the patient’s chances of being resuscitated improve. Having people willing to assist us will undoubtedly save lives.”

Read the full article by Christina Lent, at the Portland Tribune.

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January 29, 2013 | by

Free smartphone app, new to Oregon, designed to save lives through crowdsourcing CPR

AppStoreScreenShot300pxRichard Price heard a distant siren and wondered where the emergency crew was headed. The siren’s whine intensified until the crew pulled up outside the deli where Price was having lunch.

Next door, someone was in cardiac arrest: The person’s heart had stopped beating unexpectedly.

Price, who was chief of northern California’s San Ramon Valley Fire Protection District until retiring last year, is trained in cardiopulmonary resuscitation. He carried an automated external defibrillator in his car trunk. If he’d known, he could have worked to re-start the victim’s heart during the crucial minutes it took the rescue crew to arrive — minutes that frequently mean the difference between life and death for those in cardiac arrest.

The incident about three years ago inspired what Price considers the best idea he ever had: PulsePoint, a free smartphone application that fires off alerts when CPR may be needed in a public space nearby. It directs bystanders willing to perform CPR to the precise location and tells them where to find publicly accessible automated defibrillators.

Tuesday, Tualatin Valley Fire & Rescue became the first Oregon fire department to introduce and implement the app. Its developers hope its use spreads to departments across the state — even around the world.

For now in Oregon, those who live or work in, or who travel through TVF&R’s, 220-square-mile service area, and who download the PulsePoint app, could have lifesaving opportunities in their future.

“We see this as another way in which we can partner with the community to save even more lives,” says Mark Charleston, TVF&R battalion chief.

The fire department serves about 450,000 residents from U.S. 30 at its northern edge, to Charbonneau in the south, Sherwood to the west and West Linn to the east. It has a longstanding goal of increasing survival rates for cardiac patients.

Read the full article by Katy Muldoon, at The Oregonian.

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January 29, 2013 | by

TVF&R First Fire Department in Oregon to Introduce Life-Saving Smartphone App

A free CPR smartphone app called PulsePoint is now available in Tualatin Valley Fire & Rescue’s (TVF&R) service area. The PulsePoint app enables subscribers who have indicated they are CPR trained* to be alerted to a cardiac arrest event simultaneously with TVF&R’s firefighters EMT/paramedics. The app uses sophisticated location-based services to alert citizens of the need for CPR in a public place, and directs them to the exact location of the nearest public access automated external defibrillator (AED). The free PulsePoint app can be found in the Apple App Store or in Android Apps on Google Play.

Tualatin Valley Fire & Rescue is the first fire department in Oregon to implement the PulsePoint app. Media are invited to attend a press conference in which Fire Chief Mike Duyck will officially launch the first CPR alert for a cardiac arrest. Watch our PulsePoint video at TVF&R’s YouTube site.

What: Press Conference to unveil Oregon’s first PulsePoint smartphone app
When: Tuesday, January 29th, at 1 pm
Where: TVF&R Fire Station 51 (8935 SW Burnham Street, Tigard 97223)
Activities: TVF&R’s YouTube video unveiled; Cardiac arrest survivor to speak on the importance of citizen response and CPR; App demonstration; Oregon’s first PulsePoint App activation

TVFR300pxIn addition to cardiac arrest incidents, the PulsePoint app also provides a virtual window into TVF&R’s emergency activity. Users can view active incidents and dispatched units, and pinpoint incident locations on an interactive map. Users also can choose to be notified of incidents by type and monitor emergency radio traffic via this modern version of the traditional fire scanner.

Businesses, schools, and other public sites with an AED are asked to visit TVF&R’s website to see if their AED is listed in TVF&R’s PulsePoint database. If not, email us at aed@tvfr.com to add your AED.

Fire Chief Mike Duyck states, “We are honored to bring this lifesaving tool to this region. TVF&R’s cardiac survival rates are some of the highest in the nation and this technology is another way in which we can—in partnership with our community—save even more lives.” Learn more about this powerful app at www.pulsepoint.org.

* “CPR trained” can be knowing how to administer Hands-Only CPR (no rescue breaths) or traditional CPR (with rescue breaths). Individuals can find information for both types of CPR on TVF&R’s website at www.tvfr.com

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