June 6, 2013 | by

Pulse3 Foundation expanding the PulsePoint smartphone app in Michigan

logo-pulse3_foundationSAGINAW, MI — Heart disease is taking a toll on the Great Lakes Bay Region, and the Michigan CardioVascular Institute Foundation is changing to take it on.

The foundation is changing its name to Pulse3 Foundation, said President and Chief Executive Officer Diane Fong. The private foundation will become a public charity, Fong said, and add five members to its board of directors from Saginaw, Bay and Midland counties.

“Heart disease is bigger than one organization,” she said. “Our goals, passion and commitment remains unchanged.”

The death rate from heart disease is higher in Michigan and the region than the national average.

Pulse3’s vision of a community free of heart disease remains strong with community-based, widespread, regional support, Fong said.

The foundation’s programs include the Run for Your Heart Fitness and Wellness Program, Run for Your Heart Community Races, Shocks & Saves alert system for cardiopulmonary resuscitation and automated external defibrillator emergencies, deployment of AED units in the community, CPR/ AED training, community education programs, college scholarships and continuing education programs for healthcare professionals.

One example of expanded programming is the Run for Your Heart program, Fong said. The foundation will partner with the Michigan State University Extension’s diabetes prevention program. The first 20 people who sign up will receive a scholarship to Pulse3’s Run for Your Heart program.

Fong said the charity also is expanding the PulsePoint smartphone app to Isabella, Clare and Gratiot counties. The app sends alerts to people trained in CPR when someone in public collapses from cardiac arrest.

Read the full post by The Saginaw News reporter Lindsay Knake on MLive.

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March 25, 2013 | by

You Can Become A (Life-Saving) Neighborhood Superhero

Cardiac Arrest Patient1,000 sudden cardiac deaths a day–and many preventable!

1,000 Americans die every day from sudden cardiac arrest, making it a leading cause of death in the US. But many of these deaths would be prevented if CPR was initiated, and an AED was deployed, in the first few minutes after a cardiac arrest. Over the past 50 years, 300 million people have been trained in CPR, yet today, CPR is only performed in about 25% of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest cases. Think about that–only 1 out of 4 times is CPR underway when paramedics arrive. And even worse, publicly available automated external defibrillators (AED’s), the ones you see in airports, schools and other places of assembly, like hotels, are retrieved and used only 1% or 2% of the time when available– primarily because lay rescuers don’t think about them, and don’t know where to find them. Without intervention, a cardiac arrest victim has only about 10 minutes to live. But CPR suspends time, essentially stopping that 10-minute clock, and sustains life until more advanced care can arrive. So after 10 minutes you have no chance of survival; and brain damage begins several minutes before that. Even some of the best EMS systems in the country have a response time goal of 7 minutes. Not much room for error; this excruciatingly short window of opportunity is exactly why most people do not survive a sudden cardiac arrest. Today, more than ever, citizens helping citizens is the only way for the “chain of survival” to work. Local government response times are not improving in this economy – if anything they are getting worse. This simple fact should “shock” you into action: When CPR begins, and an AED is deployed, in the first few minutes after a cardiac arrest, survival rates can approach 80%.

Read the full article by John Nosta at Forbes.

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March 23, 2013 | by

STOP a heart. SAVE a life.

AEDBeyond the ability for technology to improve our lives, perhaps its most important contribution is to save these very lives. Technology has emerged to address the the most dangerous consequence of the world’s most common killer–heart disease. This is an important and critical public health issue. And I’m writing this as part scientist, part paramedic and part citizen. I have experienced the futility of a cardiac arrest in a setting where there were no trained professionals or technology at hand and also experienced the jubiliation of a life resuscitated by the aid of technology combined with knowledge.

A life-saving tool, often tragically unnoticed.
This is a call to arms for an inexpensive piece of high technology that stands ready to save lives–even your own. It’s called the Automated External Defibrillator (AED). It’s an amazing device and something that we all must know about. It’s akin to the significance of the Heimlich maneuver that also has saved many lives. Just as you see a fire extinguisher and instantly recognize its value, the AED should be “on your emergency radar” in a similar fashion. These devices are becoming common, yet their utility is sadly reserved for only a few who understand how to used them.

Read the full article by John Nosta at Forbes.

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March 10, 2013 | by

Can a new smartphone application being piloted in Michigan save lives?

Blue Cross Blue ShieldFor residents of Saginaw County, the odds of surviving sudden cardiac arrest are starting to get a lot better.

An initiative spearheaded by the Michigan CardioVascular Institute Foundation and Mobile Medical Response has made Saginaw County the pilot for a smartphone application called PulsePoint, the only county in Michigan involved in testing the technology. In fact, this is only the 12th implementation of the application in the country, and the first in the Midwest. The initiative was introduced during MCVI’s Shocks and Saves charity hockey game on Feb. 2, an event sponsored by BCBSM.

The premise behind the app is simple. People trained in basic CPR are encouraged to download the PulsePoint app. When someone goes into cardiac arrest, people who are trained and who are currently near the victim are messaged through the app so that CPR can be administered until the ambulance arrives.

“During cardiac arrest, seconds really do matter. Immediate chest compressions can triple the chances of survival. Waiting for the ambulance is not the answer — it takes a community to combat sudden cardiac arrest,” says Lynn M. Schutter, director of community relations/strategic planning for MMR.

Read the full article by David Lingholm at MI Blues Perspectives.

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February 15, 2013 | by

PulsePoint app notifies trained bystanders of people in need of CPR

Midland Daily News LogoOfficials in Saginaw hope a smartphone app will be able to connect people trained in CPR with those facing sudden cardiac arrest in the community.

The Michigan CardioVascular Institute Foundation and Mobile MedicalResponse recently announced they are offering the PulsePoint app for use in Saginaw County. PulsePoint, designed for both Android and iPhone, uses GPS to notify people with CPR training when an emergency cardiac event is happening near them.

Diane Fong, MCVI Foundation executive director, said the project will be piloted in Saginaw and could some day expand to the rest of the Great Lakes Bay Region.

The idea is simple, Fong said. If someone collapses and isn’t breathing, people would call 911 as usual and an ambulance would be dispatched to the scene. A message would simultaneously sent to PulsePoint, and the phone app would use GPS to notify users within a quarter-mile of the scene that an incident is taking place. The app includes a map showing the location of the victim and the nearest automated external defibrillator, or AED. A person using the app could locate the person in need, begin CPR and deploy the AED before the ambulance arrives.

“If you can start CPR immediately, you can double or triple the chance of survival,” Fong said.

Read the full article by Tony Lascari at the Midland Daily News.

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February 9, 2013 | by

Contra Costa Fire Districts Launch Life-Saving Mobile App

CCC Fire Agency LogosA new cellphone app launched by fire departments throughout Contra Costa County this week is designed to give everyday citizens a chance to save lives.

The PulsePoint app notifies smartphone users who are trained in CPR and willing to respond to emergencies when someone nearby is suffering a cardiac emergency and may require CPR.

Watch PulsePoint’s video

With the help of the app, trained people in close proximity to a possible cardiac emergency can begin life-saving measures that may stabilize a heart attack victim while waiting for emergency responders to arrive, according to Contra Costa County Fire Protection District Fire Marshal Lewis Broschard.

Users of the app can check their phones to see the exact location of a reported cardiac emergency and how far arriving emergency responders are from that location at any given time.

“The deployment of the PulsePoint app is the next step in developing a comprehensive network of life-saving efforts that includes fire department first responders, ambulance transport providers, the placement of publicly accessible AEDs, hospital emergency departments and members of the public who are trained in CPR,” said Contra Costa County Fire Protection District Chief Daryl Louder.

Read the full article by Bay City News at Walnut Creek Patch.

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February 2, 2013 | by

Saginaw to launch PulsePoint smartphone app, alert bystanders to assist with CPR

MCVI Foundation LogoSAGINAW, MI — It’s going to be easier to save a life in Saginaw.

And yes, there is an app for that.

The smart phone application is PulsePoint, and the Michigan CardioVascular Institute Foundation and Mobile Medical Response are launching it at the sixth annual MCVI Foundation Shocks & Saves charity hockey game, at 4:30 p.m. Feb. 2, prior to the Saginaw Spirit game.

“We’re trying to increase bystander care while ambulance is on the way and reduce the number of people who die from cardiac arrest,” said MCVI Foundation Executive Director Diane Fong.

The free phone application is available for download from the Apple store and Google Play for Android phones.

If someone is out shopping and collapses from cardiac arrest the PulsePoint app would sent out an alert to trained CPR responders who are in the area as soon as the ambulance is dispatched, Fong said.

Cardiac arrest kills about 1,000 people per day across the country. There is a survival rate of about 8 percent, but a victim who receives immediate CPR sees their survival rates triple.

Of people who go into cardiac arrest in public places, 32 percent receive from bystanders, Fong said.

PulsePoint only shows cardiac arrests in public places, she said. The app also would show the location nearby AEDs.

So far, Fong said, the app will show 200 known AEDs in the county, and she encourages people to contact her to add locations of more of the devices.

“It stands to reason that if we can provide more immediate CPR and more immediate defibrillation, see those numbers decrease,” Fong said.

Read the full article by Lindsay Knake, at Michigan Live.

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