February 1, 2013 | by

Will you answer the CPR call?

TIMES PHOTO: JONATHAN HOUSE - Tualatin Valley Fire & Rescue Fire Chief Mike Duyck Tualatin Valley Fire & Rescue wants to know if you are willing to help save a life.

Specifically, if you are willing to serve as a potential citizen rescuer on standby — ready to jump into action and perform CPR in the event someone nearby goes into sudden cardiac arrest in a public place.

The fire district on Tuesday released a new PulsePoint smartphone application that alerts CPR-trained bystanders when someone within a quarter-mile radius is in need of their aid at the precise moment emergency dispatchers activate TVF&R’s emergency crews.

The app can be downloaded free from the Apple App Store or Android Apps on Google Play.

As the first fire department in Oregon to introduce this lifesaving tool to its 220-square-mile service area, the app uses sophisticated location-based software when someone calls 911 to direct bystanders to the location of the person in need of CPR as well as the nearest accessible automated external defibrillator.

Once the citizen rescuer arrives, an emergency dispatcher on the phone with the witness who called 911 will provide instruction on how to administer hands-only CPR by pushing hard and fast on the center of the patient’s chest. Meanwhile, the rescuer can inform someone else about where to find the nearest AED.

“We can’t stress enough how critical it is for people to start CPR before we arrive,” said Mark Charleston, TVF&R’s emergency medical services battalion chief. “Every minute a person in sudden cardiac arrest goes without CPR or a shock to the heart from an AED, the chance of survival goes down by 10 percent.

“Our crews are running about three to four minutes to arrive on scene once they are dispatched. If someone starts performing CPR, it ensures we have a viable patient and the patient’s chances of being resuscitated improve. Having people willing to assist us will undoubtedly save lives.”

Read the full article by Christina Lent, at the Portland Tribune.

Full Story

January 30, 2013 | by

‘PulsePoint’ app, which helps people get lifesaving CPR, coming to Los Angeles

LAFD LogoSmartphones, already used to alert us of such pressing matters as sports scores and new Facebook posts, could soon help save lives in L.A.

The Los Angeles Fire Department will soon begin using an application called PulsePoint, which sends messages to people’s cellphones when someone is having a cardiac emergency nearby.

The hope is that people trained in CPR will install the app, see the alerts and be able to start life-saving treatment before paramedics arrive.

Sometimes, after they see an ambulance pull up, bystanders wish they had known someone needed help, said Capt. Tom Gikas, who works in the Fire Department’s Planning Section.

“How many people on a given evening in a local restaurant know CPR?” Gikas wondered.

That’s exactly the question that led to PulsePoint.

Read the full article by Eric Hartley, at the Daily News.

Full Story

January 30, 2013 | by

Michigan CardioVascular Institute (MCVI) Foundation and Mobile Medical Response (MMR) Collaborate on New APProach to Saving Lives

Michigan CardioVascular Institute Foundation – Saginaw, Michigan(SAGINAW) – As part of the MCVI Foundation’s Shocks & Saves initiative, the Foundation and MMR have teamed up to release a life-saving smartphone app called PulsePoint at their upcoming Shocks & Saves Charity Hockey Game on Saturday, February 2, 4:30 p.m., at the Dow Event Center.

The free app, designed for both Android and iPhone, uses GPS to notify people with CPR training when an emergency cardiac event is happening near them.

Initially being piloted in Saginaw County, PulsePoint works in conjunction with MMR’s Medical Communications Center to create a community CPR/AED alert system

Here’s an example of how it works:

Someone at Best Buy collapses and isn’t breathing. A cashier calls 911. While an ambulance is dispatched to the scene, the message is simultaneously sent to PulsePoint. The app uses GPS to notify users within a quarter-mile of the scene.

A shopper at nearby Guitar Center is a PulsePoint user and receives a text alert that CPR is needed at Best Buy. The app includes a map showing the location of the victim and the nearest AED. The Guitar Center shopper can proceed to Best Buy, begin CPR, and deploy the automated external defibrillator (AED) before the ambulance arrives, significantly increasing the victim’s chances of survival.

The purpose of the app is to empower ordinary citizens, who are willing and trained, to become bystander rescuers.

“Sudden cardiac arrest is not the same as a heart attack,” says Diane Fong, MCVI Foundation executive director. Sudden cardiac arrest occurs when electrical impulses in the heart become rapid or chaotic, causing the heart to suddenly stop beating. Cardiac arrest can be reversed if CPR is performed or a defibrillator is used quickly to shock the heart back to a normal rhythm. “Minutes – even seconds – are precious,” Fong explains.

By providing CPR immediately after sudden cardiac arrest – while the ambulance is on the way – bystanders can double or triple a victim’s chance of survival of a teammate, nearby shopper, congregation member, fellow diner, spectator, neighbor, or loved one. “We know so many stories of ordinary people being in the right place at the right time to save a life. Obviously, the survivors are grateful. But the rescuers are truly moved by the opportunity to make a difference, pay it forward, and save a life.”

MCVI Foundation and MMR have teamed up for their annual Shocks & Saves Charity Hockey Game for six years now, explains Lynn Schutter, MMR director of community relations and strategic planning. “We’re extending the Shocks & Saves brand beyond hockey to include our year-round efforts to empower people to save lives. There are many people out there who are willing and able to perform CPR, and when available, use AEDs to improve survivability of sudden cardiac arrest victims.”

Part of the program includes free CPR training for chest-only compressions and AED use. Both MMR and MCVI Foundation offer several opportunities for free non-certified CPR training throughout the year. To kickoff the Shocks & Saves initiative, the first training blitz will be on Saturday, February 16, at Freeland Sports Zone at 9 a.m., 10:30 a.m. and 12 noon. Each class lasts just an hour.

Tickets to this year’s hockey game, which features local physicians, EMTs, and NHL celebrities, cost $12 and include admission into that evening’s Saginaw Spirit game. All proceeds will go to fund the PulsePoint phone app, to purchase and place AEDs throughout the region, to offer CPR training at schools, and to educate the public about heart disease.

For more information, visit www.shocksandsaves.org or to donate text the key word SHOCKS to 56512.

Contacts
Diane Fong
President/CEO, MCVI Foundation
(989) 754-3319 or (989) 293-2217

Lynn Schutter
Community Relations Director, MMR
(989) 907-2013 or (989) 798-2115

Full Story

January 29, 2013 | by

Free smartphone app, new to Oregon, designed to save lives through crowdsourcing CPR

AppStoreScreenShot300pxRichard Price heard a distant siren and wondered where the emergency crew was headed. The siren’s whine intensified until the crew pulled up outside the deli where Price was having lunch.

Next door, someone was in cardiac arrest: The person’s heart had stopped beating unexpectedly.

Price, who was chief of northern California’s San Ramon Valley Fire Protection District until retiring last year, is trained in cardiopulmonary resuscitation. He carried an automated external defibrillator in his car trunk. If he’d known, he could have worked to re-start the victim’s heart during the crucial minutes it took the rescue crew to arrive — minutes that frequently mean the difference between life and death for those in cardiac arrest.

The incident about three years ago inspired what Price considers the best idea he ever had: PulsePoint, a free smartphone application that fires off alerts when CPR may be needed in a public space nearby. It directs bystanders willing to perform CPR to the precise location and tells them where to find publicly accessible automated defibrillators.

Tuesday, Tualatin Valley Fire & Rescue became the first Oregon fire department to introduce and implement the app. Its developers hope its use spreads to departments across the state — even around the world.

For now in Oregon, those who live or work in, or who travel through TVF&R’s, 220-square-mile service area, and who download the PulsePoint app, could have lifesaving opportunities in their future.

“We see this as another way in which we can partner with the community to save even more lives,” says Mark Charleston, TVF&R battalion chief.

The fire department serves about 450,000 residents from U.S. 30 at its northern edge, to Charbonneau in the south, Sherwood to the west and West Linn to the east. It has a longstanding goal of increasing survival rates for cardiac patients.

Read the full article by Katy Muldoon, at The Oregonian.

Full Story

January 29, 2013 | by

TVF&R First Fire Department in Oregon to Introduce Life-Saving Smartphone App

A free CPR smartphone app called PulsePoint is now available in Tualatin Valley Fire & Rescue’s (TVF&R) service area. The PulsePoint app enables subscribers who have indicated they are CPR trained* to be alerted to a cardiac arrest event simultaneously with TVF&R’s firefighters EMT/paramedics. The app uses sophisticated location-based services to alert citizens of the need for CPR in a public place, and directs them to the exact location of the nearest public access automated external defibrillator (AED). The free PulsePoint app can be found in the Apple App Store or in Android Apps on Google Play.

Tualatin Valley Fire & Rescue is the first fire department in Oregon to implement the PulsePoint app. Media are invited to attend a press conference in which Fire Chief Mike Duyck will officially launch the first CPR alert for a cardiac arrest. Watch our PulsePoint video at TVF&R’s YouTube site.

What: Press Conference to unveil Oregon’s first PulsePoint smartphone app
When: Tuesday, January 29th, at 1 pm
Where: TVF&R Fire Station 51 (8935 SW Burnham Street, Tigard 97223)
Activities: TVF&R’s YouTube video unveiled; Cardiac arrest survivor to speak on the importance of citizen response and CPR; App demonstration; Oregon’s first PulsePoint App activation

TVFR300pxIn addition to cardiac arrest incidents, the PulsePoint app also provides a virtual window into TVF&R’s emergency activity. Users can view active incidents and dispatched units, and pinpoint incident locations on an interactive map. Users also can choose to be notified of incidents by type and monitor emergency radio traffic via this modern version of the traditional fire scanner.

Businesses, schools, and other public sites with an AED are asked to visit TVF&R’s website to see if their AED is listed in TVF&R’s PulsePoint database. If not, email us at aed@tvfr.com to add your AED.

Fire Chief Mike Duyck states, “We are honored to bring this lifesaving tool to this region. TVF&R’s cardiac survival rates are some of the highest in the nation and this technology is another way in which we can—in partnership with our community—save even more lives.” Learn more about this powerful app at www.pulsepoint.org.

* “CPR trained” can be knowing how to administer Hands-Only CPR (no rescue breaths) or traditional CPR (with rescue breaths). Individuals can find information for both types of CPR on TVF&R’s website at www.tvfr.com

Full Story

January 25, 2013 | by

Emergency CPR Mobile App Could Save Lives

techvibes-logoCrowdsourcing is changing the way we handle digital information. It helps us distribute tasks, share photos, fund projects, and expand our professional networks.

Through a clinical trial in Toronto, one company is poised to take crowdsourcing in Canada a step further with a CPR app that could save lives.

The PulsePoint Foundation, a non-profit organization based in the San Francisco Bay Area, has developed the PulsePoint app to help victims who have gone into sudden cardiac arrest. The app alerts people in the area who have CPR training when someone nearby is experiencing a cardiac event.

Using the app, which is available for Android and iOS, 911 dispatchers will send out a message to users in the vicinity. If you have the PulsePoint app on your smartphone, you’ll immediately receive a notification, whether you’re in the grocery store, the mall, or even at a hockey game.

Read the full article by Taryn McMillan at Techvibes.

Full Story