December 10, 2012 | by

App Makes Bystanders Key in Cardiac Arrest Survival

Firehouse Magazine LogoCitizens in a growing number of cities around the U.S. are now getting alerted when there’s an opportunity to perform bystander CPR, thanks to the PulsePoint phone app.

The free app, which notifies trained citizens of nearby cardiac emergencies and the location of the nearest AED, was originally developed and tested by the San Ramon Valley (Calif.) Fire Protection District. It works by connecting a participating agency’s dispatch data into the PulsePoint service so that citizen alerts go out simultaneously with the dispatch of local fire and EMS resources. (Citizen alerts only go out for cardiac emergencies in public places, not to private addresses.) The app shows the victim and the nearby AEDs on a map, in context to the recipient of the alert.

The app has had several updates and releases since it first launched.“The app is in a continuous update cycle,” said Price, thanks to time donated by professional developers at Workday, Inc. “We’re working on a major new version right now.”

In February, after the program had been running locally in San Ramon for over a year, the PulsePoint Foundation opened it up to other agencies. It has quickly spread in California and nationally.

“By the end of the month we expect it to be in more than 100 cities,” said San Ramon Valley Fire Chief Richard Price, who is also the president of the PulsePoint foundation.

Read the full article by Heather Caspi at Firehouse.com.

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February 7, 2012 | by

Media Advisory – San José Fire Department and El Camino Hospital unveil free, lifesaving CPR mobile phone app to San José community

SAN JOSE, Calif. – In conjunction with Valentine’s Day, San José community leaders are launching PulsePoint, a free cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) “citizen first responder” mobile phone application (app). This new app is designed to help CPR-trained users in the San José Fire Department service area provide life-saving assistance to victims of sudden cardiac arrest.

What
News conference to announce new lifesaving CPR mobile phone app to the San Jose community

Who
San José Mayor Chuck Reed
San José Fire Chief William McDonald
PulsePoint President/San Ramon Valley Fire Chief Richard Price
President and CEO of El Camino Hospital Tomi Ryba
Dave Duffield, co-founder/co-CEO Workday

When
Tuesday, February 14 from 1:00 – 1:30 p.m.

Where
San José City Hall Rotunda, 200 E. Santa Clara Street

Background
The San José Fire Department, through funding from El Camino Hospital, is now able to provide the free PulsePoint app to the San José Fire Department service area. Available for both the iPhone and Android smartphones, PulsePoint gives the public the ability to provide life-saving assistance to victims of sudden cardiac arrest which causes nearly 1,000 deaths a day in the United States. App users, who have indicated they are trained in CPR, can be notified if someone nearby is having a cardiac emergency and may require CPR. If the cardiac emergency is in a public place, the app, using sophisticated location-based services, will alert those in the vicinity of the need for CPR. The application also directs citizen rescuers to the exact location of the closest public access Automated External Defibrillator (AED).

Contacts
Captain Mary Gutierrez
Public Information Officer
Office (408) 794-6959
Cell (408) 398-9228
sjfdpio@sanjoseca.gov

Chris Ernst
El Camino Hospital
Office (650) 962-5853
chris.ernst@elcaminohospital.org

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January 24, 2012 | by

Location-based App for CPR Responders Spreads to Second City

Kerry Davis of IDG News Service recently rode along with San Ramon Valley Fire Protection District Paramedics and interviewed Fire Chief Richard Price. The article below appeared in CIO Magazine, Macworld and PCWorld.

A location-based phone application that alerts people trained in CPR when someone nearby is having a heart attack will be spreading from San Ramon, California, to San Jose by mid-February, according to San Ramon Valley Fire Protection District Chief Richard Price.

The PulsePoint app sends a notification to a smartphone if the user is close to a possible heart attack victim, but only if the emergency is happening in a public space. The app has been available for more than a year and was recently added to the Android Market in addition to being available in the iPhone App Store.

The PulsePoint Foundation is working with more than 150 agencies that are interested in bringing the PulsePoint app to their communities, from Fargo, North Dakota, to an agency in Sao Paulo, Brazil, said a spokeswoman with the San Ramon Valley Fire Protection District.

Users must first confirm that they are CPR-certified, and the app then alerts them if dispatchers are sending EMTs to a potential heart attack victim in a public location. Price says heart attack victims are the focus of the app because resuscitation needs to be started within 10 minutes of the attack if victims are to have a chance of survival.

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