May 24, 2013 | by

The Location of Cardiac Arrests Near You and Yelp’s Public Health Foray

Health 2.0 NewsThere was a lot of humility on stage when members of government organizations presented this week at the Healthy Communities Data Summit (HCDS) in San Francisco: “We could never pull this off on our own.” “We move at snail’s pace.” “We are poor.”

Like its cousin event Health Datapalooza, taking place in Washington, D.C. next month, HCDS’ purpose is to rally different groups around open data. Last year at Datapalooza, the government showcased applications and tools built with the data it had released. It called on private organizations to follow suit and to release their own data. And its strongest call was to anyone and everyone able to make useful things with that data. The message was to keep trying.

Government organizations in the Bay Area, and all local governments for that matter, have a big advantage over the federal government when making the same call to action. On their side is the fact that local developers are motivated to work on projects that can have a direct and observable impact on the place they call home.

Take the technology executive turned fire chief of the San Ramon Valley Fire Protection District in California. He was having lunch one day when he heard sirens nearby. They continued to get closer and closer. It wasn’t until the fire chief left the restaurant that he realized an emergency team was responding to a man who had gone into cardiac arrest next door. Had he known, he could have reached the man and started administering CPR long before EMS arrived.

Bradley Kreit, co-director of the Health Horizons Program at the Institute for the Future, told this story at HCDS. He went on to explain that the fire chief reacted by developing his own app for those very situations. First responders and people trained in CPR can now download the PulsePoint app, which alerts them in real time to cardiac arrest incidents nearby.

“First responder classes were so popular, they were booked out for two or three months in advance in San Ramon because people all of a sudden felt they could put the skill of learning first response to use,” Kreit said.

Read the full post by Laura Montini on Health 2.0 News.

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December 10, 2012 | by

App Makes Bystanders Key in Cardiac Arrest Survival

Firehouse Magazine LogoCitizens in a growing number of cities around the U.S. are now getting alerted when there’s an opportunity to perform bystander CPR, thanks to the PulsePoint phone app.

The free app, which notifies trained citizens of nearby cardiac emergencies and the location of the nearest AED, was originally developed and tested by the San Ramon Valley (Calif.) Fire Protection District. It works by connecting a participating agency’s dispatch data into the PulsePoint service so that citizen alerts go out simultaneously with the dispatch of local fire and EMS resources. (Citizen alerts only go out for cardiac emergencies in public places, not to private addresses.) The app shows the victim and the nearby AEDs on a map, in context to the recipient of the alert.

The app has had several updates and releases since it first launched.“The app is in a continuous update cycle,” said Price, thanks to time donated by professional developers at Workday, Inc. “We’re working on a major new version right now.”

In February, after the program had been running locally in San Ramon for over a year, the PulsePoint Foundation opened it up to other agencies. It has quickly spread in California and nationally.

“By the end of the month we expect it to be in more than 100 cities,” said San Ramon Valley Fire Chief Richard Price, who is also the president of the PulsePoint foundation.

Read the full article by Heather Caspi at Firehouse.com.

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December 7, 2012 | by

San Ramon Valley Fire Receives Tri-Valley Heroes Award

Chief Richard Price demonstrating the PulsePoint appIn early 2010, Fire Chief Richard Price was sitting with a couple of his coworkers in a San Ramon restaurant when they heard a fire engine nearby.

That was no big deal. Price hears them all the time, but he idly wondered where the truck was headed. To his surprise, the truck pulled up right next to where he was eating.

Someone had gone into cardiac arrest. While Price gets paged if there’s a fire, he had received no notification of this, even though he had a defibrillator in his truck.

That got him thinking: A brain can survive only about 10 minutes after a heart stops, and the San Ramon Valley Fire Protection District averages about seven minutes to arrive on scene.

It took about a year, but in January 2011 the SRVFPD released an app designed to create “citizen heroes” to offer CPR, and, if possible, to use an Automated Electronic Defibrillator (AED).

Read the full article by Glenn Wohltmann in the San Ramon Valley Express.

The Tri-Valley Heroes award honors individuals or groups for their positive influence on the Valley and the lives of its residents.

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