June 29, 2013 | by

PulsePoint Responder – In Her Own Words

On March 27th 2013, the PulsePoint mobile app deployed in Tualatin Valley Fire and Rescue notified three nearby citizen responders that someone close to their location was in need of CPR. Heather Roms, who is an RN for Legacy Emanuel Medical Center in Portland, was just leaving a nearby business when she received the PulsePoint notification on her smartphone. Heather responded and began CPR until EMS crews arrived. Heather stated that she heard about the app from her mother who works at a nearby middle school and was happy to be available to respond and help. Watch her story below.

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April 4, 2013 | by

Nurse uses lifesaving app to find, try to help man in cardiac arrest

Heather Rom (Portland Tribune)Heather Roms was inside her car near Pediatric Dental when she saw and heard the alert on her phone that someone nearby was having a cardiac emergency. The app gave her the address and location, and Roms quickly drove to Shari’s Restaurant, where a man was having a cardiac emergency.

A labor and delivery nurse who’s accustomed to using the most modern technology to save newborns in jeopardy relied on just her own skills to try and save a man’s life last week.

Heather Roms, 39, of West Linn, was just leaving her daughter’s dentist appointment about 9 a.m. March 27 on Southwest Town Center Loop in Wilsonville when she received an alert on her smartphone that someone nearby was having a cardiac emergency.

It was the first time she had seen the alert on her phone, and she guessed she must be pretty close to where it was taking place.

At first, the PulsePoint application showed only the address of the location where the emergency was happening. Those who subscribe to the app receive notification of the emergency at the same time as first responders.

In this instance, first responders were paramedics from Tualatin Valley Fire & Rescue and AMR ambulance.

At first, Roms wondered whether she should respond, not knowing how instantaneously she received the alert.

Read the full article by Michelle Te at the Portland Tribune.

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March 28, 2013 | by

Oregon Responder Alerted to Cardiac Arrest by PulsePoint

TVF&R LogoAn Oregon citizen, alerted to a cardiac arrest at a Wilsonville restaurant by a special signal on her smartphone, became the first citizen responder to arrive at the scene of a medical emergency on Wednesday using the PulsePoint alert notification system.

Tualatin Valley Fire and Rescue in Tigard, along with American Medical Response, were dispatched to a cardiac arrest at Shari’s Restaurant at 9:02 a.m. in Wilsonville. Simultaneously, TVF&R’s PulsePoint mobile app notified three nearby citizen responders that someone near their locations needed CPR.

Heather Roms, a registered nurse for Legacy Emanuel Medical Center in Portland, was leaving a nearby business when she received the alert and responded to the restaurant. Upon arriving, she began hands-only CPR until EMS crews arrived.

Read the full article on Firehouse.com.

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February 1, 2013 | by

Will you answer the CPR call?

TIMES PHOTO: JONATHAN HOUSE - Tualatin Valley Fire & Rescue Fire Chief Mike Duyck Tualatin Valley Fire & Rescue wants to know if you are willing to help save a life.

Specifically, if you are willing to serve as a potential citizen rescuer on standby — ready to jump into action and perform CPR in the event someone nearby goes into sudden cardiac arrest in a public place.

The fire district on Tuesday released a new PulsePoint smartphone application that alerts CPR-trained bystanders when someone within a quarter-mile radius is in need of their aid at the precise moment emergency dispatchers activate TVF&R’s emergency crews.

The app can be downloaded free from the Apple App Store or Android Apps on Google Play.

As the first fire department in Oregon to introduce this lifesaving tool to its 220-square-mile service area, the app uses sophisticated location-based software when someone calls 911 to direct bystanders to the location of the person in need of CPR as well as the nearest accessible automated external defibrillator.

Once the citizen rescuer arrives, an emergency dispatcher on the phone with the witness who called 911 will provide instruction on how to administer hands-only CPR by pushing hard and fast on the center of the patient’s chest. Meanwhile, the rescuer can inform someone else about where to find the nearest AED.

“We can’t stress enough how critical it is for people to start CPR before we arrive,” said Mark Charleston, TVF&R’s emergency medical services battalion chief. “Every minute a person in sudden cardiac arrest goes without CPR or a shock to the heart from an AED, the chance of survival goes down by 10 percent.

“Our crews are running about three to four minutes to arrive on scene once they are dispatched. If someone starts performing CPR, it ensures we have a viable patient and the patient’s chances of being resuscitated improve. Having people willing to assist us will undoubtedly save lives.”

Read the full article by Christina Lent, at the Portland Tribune.

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January 29, 2013 | by

Free smartphone app, new to Oregon, designed to save lives through crowdsourcing CPR

AppStoreScreenShot300pxRichard Price heard a distant siren and wondered where the emergency crew was headed. The siren’s whine intensified until the crew pulled up outside the deli where Price was having lunch.

Next door, someone was in cardiac arrest: The person’s heart had stopped beating unexpectedly.

Price, who was chief of northern California’s San Ramon Valley Fire Protection District until retiring last year, is trained in cardiopulmonary resuscitation. He carried an automated external defibrillator in his car trunk. If he’d known, he could have worked to re-start the victim’s heart during the crucial minutes it took the rescue crew to arrive — minutes that frequently mean the difference between life and death for those in cardiac arrest.

The incident about three years ago inspired what Price considers the best idea he ever had: PulsePoint, a free smartphone application that fires off alerts when CPR may be needed in a public space nearby. It directs bystanders willing to perform CPR to the precise location and tells them where to find publicly accessible automated defibrillators.

Tuesday, Tualatin Valley Fire & Rescue became the first Oregon fire department to introduce and implement the app. Its developers hope its use spreads to departments across the state — even around the world.

For now in Oregon, those who live or work in, or who travel through TVF&R’s, 220-square-mile service area, and who download the PulsePoint app, could have lifesaving opportunities in their future.

“We see this as another way in which we can partner with the community to save even more lives,” says Mark Charleston, TVF&R battalion chief.

The fire department serves about 450,000 residents from U.S. 30 at its northern edge, to Charbonneau in the south, Sherwood to the west and West Linn to the east. It has a longstanding goal of increasing survival rates for cardiac patients.

Read the full article by Katy Muldoon, at The Oregonian.

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January 29, 2013 | by

TVF&R First Fire Department in Oregon to Introduce Life-Saving Smartphone App

A free CPR smartphone app called PulsePoint is now available in Tualatin Valley Fire & Rescue’s (TVF&R) service area. The PulsePoint app enables subscribers who have indicated they are CPR trained* to be alerted to a cardiac arrest event simultaneously with TVF&R’s firefighters EMT/paramedics. The app uses sophisticated location-based services to alert citizens of the need for CPR in a public place, and directs them to the exact location of the nearest public access automated external defibrillator (AED). The free PulsePoint app can be found in the Apple App Store or in Android Apps on Google Play.

Tualatin Valley Fire & Rescue is the first fire department in Oregon to implement the PulsePoint app. Media are invited to attend a press conference in which Fire Chief Mike Duyck will officially launch the first CPR alert for a cardiac arrest. Watch our PulsePoint video at TVF&R’s YouTube site.

What: Press Conference to unveil Oregon’s first PulsePoint smartphone app
When: Tuesday, January 29th, at 1 pm
Where: TVF&R Fire Station 51 (8935 SW Burnham Street, Tigard 97223)
Activities: TVF&R’s YouTube video unveiled; Cardiac arrest survivor to speak on the importance of citizen response and CPR; App demonstration; Oregon’s first PulsePoint App activation

TVFR300pxIn addition to cardiac arrest incidents, the PulsePoint app also provides a virtual window into TVF&R’s emergency activity. Users can view active incidents and dispatched units, and pinpoint incident locations on an interactive map. Users also can choose to be notified of incidents by type and monitor emergency radio traffic via this modern version of the traditional fire scanner.

Businesses, schools, and other public sites with an AED are asked to visit TVF&R’s website to see if their AED is listed in TVF&R’s PulsePoint database. If not, email us at aed@tvfr.com to add your AED.

Fire Chief Mike Duyck states, “We are honored to bring this lifesaving tool to this region. TVF&R’s cardiac survival rates are some of the highest in the nation and this technology is another way in which we can—in partnership with our community—save even more lives.” Learn more about this powerful app at www.pulsepoint.org.

* “CPR trained” can be knowing how to administer Hands-Only CPR (no rescue breaths) or traditional CPR (with rescue breaths). Individuals can find information for both types of CPR on TVF&R’s website at www.tvfr.com

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