February 14, 2014 | by

Announcing the Rollout of PulsePoint in Spokane County

Media Contact: Captain Scott Crawford – (509) 954-4750, PIO Bill Clifford – (509) 928-1700

What: The Spokane County Combined Communications Center and Spokane County Fire Departments are proud to announce the arrival of the PulsePoint smartphone App in Spokane County.

When: Friday, February 14, 2014 from 10:00 AM to Noon

Where: Spokane Fire Department Field House, 1618 N. Rebecca Spokane, WA 99212

Now your smartphone can help you save a life. A free smartphone App called PulsePoint will soon be available in Spokane County. PulsePoint enables subscribers who are CPR trained to be alerted to a sudden cardiac arrest at the same time emergency responders are notified. Registered users will be notified when a sudden cardiac arrest has occurred in a public place within their vicinity. PulsePoint will give the citizen responder mapping directions, notify them of any automatic external defibrillators (AEDs) in the area, and provide radio traffic of the emergency responders. Early CPR is the key if a sudden cardiac arrest victim is to survive. When a person goes into sudden cardiac arrest, their heart, brain, and other vital organs no longer receive oxygen. Researchers have found that without early CPR within the first 3 to 5 minutes, a sudden cardiac arrest victim’s chances of survival are dramatically reduced. The free PulsePoint app can be found in the Apple App Store or on Google Play.

You only need to be willing to do “Hands-Only” CPR. According to the American Heart Association, Hands-Only CPR has been shown to be as effective as conventional CPR in the first minutes of sudden cardiac arrest. Subscribers can also view active fire and emergency medical incidents and monitor emergency radio traffic.

Activities:

Welcome and introductions: Bobby Williams – Spokane Fire Chief

PulsePoint Origins and History: Bryan Collins – Spokane Valley Fire Chief

PulsePoint – Enhancing the chain of survival: Michael Metcalf, M.D. – EMS Council

Spokane County Combined Communications Center role in PulsePoint activations: Brian Schaeffer – Spokane Fire Assistant Chief

A personal story of survival: Survivor Speaker – Sudden Cardiac Arrest Foundation

On screen walkthrough of finding, downloading, installing, and configuring the app: Brian Schaeffer – Spokane Fire Assistant Chief

  • Find the app on the Apple App Store and Google Play.
  • Install the app.
  • Choose agency and alert options.
  • Learn about other features.

PulsePoint demonstration: With sudden cardiac arrest victim, PulsePoint activation, Good Samaritan response, AED acquisition, arrival of SVFD Paramedics and AMR, demonstration of Pit Crew CPR.

Closing Remarks: Bobby Williams – Spokane Fire Chief

Additionally there will be:

Knowledge experts on site to show event participants PulsePoint and help them install and configure the app on their phones and other devices.
Handouts discussing Early Activation, Early CPR, Early Defibrillation with the AED, Rapid Transport, Emergency Room and Hospital Care.
Heart healthy snacks and drinks for attendees.

Websites:

Home


http://www.spokanevalleyfire.com/
https://www.facebook.com/spokanefire

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February 10, 2014 | by

Cleveland Clinic, City Of Cleveland and Westshore Fire Departments Launch Smartphone App to Help Improve Community Response to Sudden Cardiac Arrest

PulsePoint Connects CPR-Trained Citizens to Cardiac Emergencies

Monday, February 10, 2014, Cleveland: Cleveland Clinic in conjunction with the City of Cleveland and five WestShore fire departments has launched the PulsePoint CPR/AED smartphone app to help improve sudden cardiac arrest (SCA) survival rates.

The PulsePoint app helps improve community response to SCA victims by notifying and enabling citizen bystanders that lifesaving cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) is needed and where someone can access a nearby automated external defibrillator (AED).

“Cleveland Clinic’s heart program continues to rank as the best in the nation and we saw it as a natural fit to bring the PulsePoint tool to Northeast Ohio,” said Brad Borden, M.D., Chair of Cleveland Clinic’s Emergency Services Institute. “We hope that local citizens will join us in our fight to combat the No. 1 cause of death in the United States and encourage everyone that is trained in CPR to download and use the application.”

The PulsePoint software has been integrated with the computer aided dispatch systems in the cities of Cleveland, Bay Village, Westlake, Rocky River, Fairview Park and North Ridgeville. Upon receiving a call regarding a suspected sudden cardiac arrest victim, the 911/emergency communication center activates an alert to PulsePoint app users simultaneously with the dispatch of local emergency medical services (EMS). Using a smart phone’s geolocation service, the app directs citizen responders within close proximity, to the victim’s location and the nearest public access AED. The alert will only notify app users when an emergency is taking place in a public setting.

“This is another example of the strong partnership the City of Cleveland has with Cleveland Clinic that helps improve quality of life for citizens and visitors of this community,” said Cleveland EMS Commissioner Nicole Carlton. “PulsePoint will provide the general public a unique opportunity to assist in the reduction of cardiac arrest mortality and partner with our first responders in a meaningful way. The app also provides detailed locations of all of the automated external defibrillators installed and maintained by the Division of EMS. Rapid application of defibrillation and CPR can improve survival rates to sudden cardiac arrest exponentially.”

Sudden cardiac arrest is a leading cause of death in the United States, accounting for an estimated 325,000 deaths each year or 1,000 deaths per day. When SCA occurs, the heart stops beating in an effective, organized manner. As a result, blood is no longer pumped throughout the body. The person suddenly passes out and appears lifeless, except for abnormal gasping which may last several minutes. Effective bystander CPR provided immediately after sudden cardiac arrest can double or triple a victim’s chance of survival. Failure to act and doing nothing in a cardiac emergency can lead to unnecessary deaths.

“The seconds and minutes following a sudden cardiac arrest are critical to saving a person’s life,” said Bay Village Fire Chief Christopher Lyons. “The PulsePoint app will allow citizens to partner with their local fire departments in providing immediate assistance to those in such need. We very much appreciate that the Cleveland Clinic has partnered with the WestShore fire departments to bring this technology and its potential lifesaving assistance to the communities we serve. We hope that everyone with CPR training will download this app immediately. We also hope that people will consider signing up for a CPR class if they are not yet trained.”

The free PulsePoint app is available to the public for Apple iOS and Google Android devices from the Apple App Store and Google Play. After downloading, select “Cleveland EMS” and “WestShore Fire Departments” as the agencies to follow. There is also a “CPR How-To” section on the app that offers instructions on performing CPR for those not certified.

“We are very excited to partner with Cleveland Clinic and bring PulsePoint to the citizens of Cleveland,” said Richard Price, President of the PulsePoint Foundation. “This allows us to expand our reach in offering the lifesaving capabilities of the app and help improve cardiac arrest survival rates throughout the region.”

About Cleveland Clinic
Cleveland Clinic is a nonprofit multispecialty academic medical center that integrates clinical and hospital care with research and education. Located in Cleveland, Ohio, it was founded in 1921 by four renowned physicians with a vision of providing outstanding patient care based upon the principles of cooperation, compassion and innovation. Cleveland Clinic has pioneered many medical breakthroughs, including coronary artery bypass surgery and the first face transplant in the United States. U.S.News & World Report consistently names Cleveland Clinic as one of the nation’s best hospitals in its annual “America’s Best Hospitals” survey. More than 3,000 full-time salaried physicians and researchers and 11,000 nurses represent 120 medical specialties and subspecialties. The Cleveland Clinic health system includes a main campus near downtown Cleveland, eight community hospitals, more than 75 Northern Ohio outpatient locations, including 16 full-service Family Health Centers, Cleveland Clinic Florida, the Lou Ruvo Center for Brain Health in Las Vegas, Cleveland Clinic Canada, and, currently under construction, Cleveland Clinic Abu Dhabi. In 2012, there were 5.1 million outpatient visits throughout the Cleveland Clinic health system and 157,000 hospital admissions. Patients came for treatment from every state and from more than 130 countries. Visit us at www.clevelandclinic.org. Follow us at www.twitter.com/ClevelandClinic.

About the PulsePoint Foundation
PulsePoint is a 501(c)(3) non-profit foundation based in the San Francisco Bay Area. Its mission is to make it much easier for citizens who are trained in CPR to use their life-saving skills to do just that…save lives! Through the use of modern, location-aware mobile devices PulsePoint is building applications that work with local public safety agencies to improve communications with citizens and empower them to help reduce the millions of annual deaths from sudden cardiac arrest. Learn more at www.pulsepoint.org.

Editor’s Note: Cleveland Clinic News Service is available to provide broadcast-quality interviews and B-roll upon request.

Contact
Jenny Popis
Cleveland Clinic, Corporate Communications
popisj@ccf.org
216.444.8853

###

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January 22, 2014 | by

PulsePoint app could allow you to save a life

Steve MelanderMERCED COUNTY, Calif. (KFSN) — A new smartphone app is making it easier for people in the North Valley to help save lives. It alerts users when someone is going into cardiac arrest near them.

Emergency responders rush to hundreds of cardiac arrest calls each year in Merced County, and they say every minute truly counts.

Riggs Ambulance General Manager Steve Melander said, “The statistics show for every minute that goes by your chance of surviving a sudden cardiac arrest goes down by 10 percent.”

That’s why several local agencies, including Riggs Ambulance and the Merced City Fire Department, are now working together to promote the PULSE program.

Melander added, “PULSE stands for Public and Professional Unified Life Saving Effort, so it’s a new program where we can enact citizen responders.”

Residents who are willing to perform CPR can now download the PulsePoint app for any smartphone. It uses GPS information to alert you if someone is going into sudden cardiac arrest in a public place within a quarter mile of your location. It also shows you how to access nearby automatic external defibrillators.

Chief Michael McLaughlin with the Merced City Fire Department said, “Our goal is to help our citizens become the first first responders. The people that are in the business next door to an incident can lend a hand before we can ever get there.”

Read the full article by Sara Sandrik at ABC.

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December 23, 2013 | by

Local Fire Departments Develop New App

Moorhead ProfileHave you ever wanted to be a superhero?

Well, even though you won’t ever be able to fly, the Moorhead and Fargo Fire Departments have joined a mobile device app service called Pulsepoint that could give you superpowers.

The application’s motto is “Enabling Citizen Superheroes” and the Fire Department hopes it will do just that.

Do you know CPR?

Are you willing to save a life?

These are the main questions behind the app PulsePoint.

“A citizen running the application will receive a notification, if they sign up for alerts, when they are within one quarter mile of somebody recording a cardiac arrest incident in Fargo Moorhead. There might be somebody only a minute away that is trained in CPR and is able and willing to help,” said Moorhead Assistant Fire Chief Jeff Wallin.

More than 1,000 people die from cardiac arrest each day, and ¼ of those people don’t get CPR in time.

This smart phone application will notify people when someone in their immediate area is suffering sudden cardiac arrest so that if they know CPR they can get there before authorities do.

“They found that for every minute that CPR is withheld or delayed you lose about 10% of your chance of recovery, and within 10 minutes we typically have brain death starting to occur,” Wallin said.

Citizens feel this application will do great things for the community.

“I think it’s a good idea, I think that anytime you have that kind of help right there to save someone’s life it’s good,” off duty nurse Jennifer Kwasnkiewski said.

Read the full article by Jamie Elias at KVRR FOX.

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December 23, 2013 | by

Fargo, Moorhead unveil app to get quicker help for sudden cardiac arrest victims

Moorhead Fire Chief Richard DuysenA new local smartphone app may help save lives by turning more people into rescuers.

A new local smartphone app may help save lives by turning more people into rescuers.

The PulsePoint app is integrated with the Red River Regional Dispatch Center, which handles calls throughout the metro area. When a call comes in about a suspected cardiac arrest, the 911 communications center activates an alert to PulsePoint app users simultaneously with Fargo and Moorhead fire and police units and F-M Ambulance.

Using a smartphone’s geo-location services, the app alerts users trained in CPR who are within a quarter-mile of the victim, directing them via a live map to the person suffering cardiac arrest. It will also show the nearest automated external defibrillator, or AED.

Fire chiefs from both cities unveiled the app during a news conference at Fargo City Hall on Monday and said they expect the app to improve the communities’ survival rate for sudden cardiac arrest – a frequently fatal condition in which the heart suddenly and unexpectedly stops beating.

“When someone experiences cardiac arrest, time is critical,” said Fargo Fire Chief Steve Dirksen. “A victim may die within minutes unless they receive early CPR and have access to a defibrillator.”

Moorhead Assistant Fire Chief Jeff Wallin said the two cities are the first fire departments in North Dakota and Minnesota to implement PulsePoint.

“I would like to think we are at the front of a wave that is just sweeping across the country right now,” Wallin said.

Read the full article by Robin Huebner at INFORUM.

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December 23, 2013 | by

New medical app has potential to save lives

Fargo (ND) Press ConferenceFargo, ND (WDAY TV) – The difference between life and death could come down to a new Smartphone app.

Monday, Fargo and Moorhead fire departments announced the launch of Pulse Point.

It is an app that provides notifications for CPR and other emergencies in the immediate area of the person using the app.

F-M fire departments hope the app can save lives.

Jeff Wallin- Asst. Chief, Moorhead Fire Dept.: “It’s our hope that everybody in the community will download the application. Think about a friend, family worker, or coworker. If they suffer a problem right around the block; that instead of having somebody three to five minutes away, if you had somebody that was just one minute away around the corner… That could keep somebody alive until additional help can arrive can make a huge impact for everybody in the Fargo-Moorhead area.”

The app is up and running, so feel free to download it on your smart phone.

Watch the news clip from WDAY 6 (ABC) Fargo, ND.

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December 23, 2013 | by

Fargo-Moorhead Fire Departments Unveil Emergency App

Fargo FD AppA new smart phone application will enable people in the community to help out in emergency situations around the Fargo-Moorhead area. The fire departments in Fargo and Moorhead unveiled the app in a joint news conference Monday.

The app is called PulsePoint. Once you download the app, you then select your location and mark certain emergencies you’d like to be notified about. Users who are trained in cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) are notified if someone nearby is having a cardiac emergency and may require CPR. If you decide to allow push notifications, you can also choose to be alerted during fire alarms, motor vehicle crashes, or medical emergencies, just to name a few.

As long as the GPS on your smart phone is turned on, and you are within a quarter-mile of the emergency, you will receive a notification. When you get an alert, you also have the option to see how many automated external defibrillators (AED) are in the area and where they are located.

The fire departments say the quicker victims are able to get help in an emergency, the better. They say the app will give users CPR instructions and other directions similar to those that dispatchers at Red River Regional Dispatch would give over the phone if you were to call 911. The app follows guidelines recommended by the American Heart Association regarding hands-only CPR.

Although not everyone may feel comfortable helping in an emergency situation, emergency responders say any type of assistance before they arrive could make a huge difference in an emergency situation.

“With only one quarter of all cardiac arrests victims receiving CPR, PulsePoint increases the odds that CPR and defibrillation will be provided even before emergency crews arrive on scene. Improving the chances of survival after a cardiac arrest,” explains Fargo Fire Chief Steve Dirksen.

Read the full story at NBCNews.com

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December 3, 2013 | by

Unique app alerts trained citizens to victim in their area who needs CPR

San Diego BOS Mtg 12/3/2013SAN DIEGO – The San Diego County Board of Supervisors unanimously agreed Tuesday to begin negotiations with the maker of a smartphone app that notifies people with CPR training that someone nearby is suffering sudden cardiac arrest.

County officials said sudden cardiac arrest occurs in outwardly healthy people, and claims nearly 1,000 lives daily throughout the country. It can be treated with early CPR, defibrillation, advanced cardiac life support and mild therapeutic hypothermia, which is most effective when started in three to five minutes

However, emergency response times are often six minutes or longer, Supervisor Ron Roberts said.

“Clearly the faster first responders can get to the victim, the greater the opportunity for saving lives,” Roberts said.

Read the full story by ABC 10News San Diego.

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November 23, 2013 | by

Taking pulse of CPR

Clark County unveils smartphone app that can help save lives of cardiac arrest victims

Troy-Wayrynen_TheColumbian_11222013_300pxApproximately 360 to 370 people go into cardiac arrest annually in Clark County, and an average of 17 percent survive, Dr. Lynn Wittwer said Friday.

Wittwer, the county’s emergency medical services program director, said he was defining “survive” as patients who leave the hospital in good neurological condition.

While a 17 percent survival rate ranks higher than many places in the United States, Wittwer would like to increase the survival rate to 30 percent.

And a tool he believes will help was unveiled Friday at the Clark County Public Service Center: PulsePoint, a free smartphone app that alerts CPR-trained users to a cardiac arrest in public.

The Vancouver Fire Department has been working about two years to get the app activated here, ever since Chief Joe Molina heard about it in California. A $25,000 grant paid for the behind-the-scenes work that Clark Regional Emergency Services Agency had to do in order for the app to work countywide. When a call about a cardiac arrest goes to 911, users of PulsePoint who are within 400 yards of the call will be alerted.

Chief Nick Swinhart of the Camas-Washougal Fire Department demonstrated the app Friday.

Now that Vancouver police and sheriff’s patrol cars are equipped with automated external defibrillators, the PulsePoint app has the next greatest potential to increase survival rates for cardiac arrest victims, Swinhart said. Emergency responders are hoping residents who know CPR will download the app, greatly increasing the chance that if someone suffers cardiac arrest in public there will be someone able to respond within a few minutes.

After downloading the app, the user clicks “Clark County” from a list of agencies. Then, under settings, her or she selects “CPR” from call types.

The user can listen to emergency radio traffic if alerted to a nearby cardiac arrest call. A map will show the patient’s exact location.

Doug Smith-Lee, EMS manager for CRESA, reiterated the app only alerts people to calls made from nearby public locations.

Read the full article by Stephanie Rice at The Columbian. Photo by Roy Wayrynen.

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