June 10, 2015 | by

Clinical Trial: Mobile-Phone Dispatch of Laypersons for CPR in Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest

Bystander-initiated cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) before the arrival of emergency-medical-services (EMS) personnel is associated with a rate of survival among patients with out-of-hospital cardiac arrest that is up to three times as high as the rate among patients who do not receive such assistance. Low rates of bystander-initiated CPR are a major obstacle to improved survival rates.

The usual approach to increase rates of bystander-initiated CPR has been to train as much of the public as possible. However, this approach is associated with substantial costs and uncertain effects on rates of bystander-initiated CPR. With the use of a mobile-phone positioning system, persons who have mobile phones can be located and sent to assist patients with suspected out-of-hospital cardiac arrest; this approach has been reported in prior pilot and simulation studies.

We hypothesized that the use of a mobile-phone positioning system to dispatch lay responders who are trained in CPR to assist patients with suspected out-of-hospital cardiac arrest would increase the proportion of cases in which CPR was performed by trained bystanders.

Conclusion
The use of a mobile-phone positioning system for location and dispatch of lay volunteers who were trained in CPR to patients nearby who had out-of-hospital cardiac arrest significantly increased the rate of bystander-initiated CPR.

Read more about the study and results in The New England Journal of Medicine.

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January 25, 2013 | by

Emergency CPR Mobile App Could Save Lives

techvibes-logoCrowdsourcing is changing the way we handle digital information. It helps us distribute tasks, share photos, fund projects, and expand our professional networks.

Through a clinical trial in Toronto, one company is poised to take crowdsourcing in Canada a step further with a CPR app that could save lives.

The PulsePoint Foundation, a non-profit organization based in the San Francisco Bay Area, has developed the PulsePoint app to help victims who have gone into sudden cardiac arrest. The app alerts people in the area who have CPR training when someone nearby is experiencing a cardiac event.

Using the app, which is available for Android and iOS, 911 dispatchers will send out a message to users in the vicinity. If you have the PulsePoint app on your smartphone, you’ll immediately receive a notification, whether you’re in the grocery store, the mall, or even at a hockey game.

Read the full article by Taryn McMillan at Techvibes.

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January 15, 2013 | by

Queen’s University Leads Toronto Test of Life-Saving App

Kingston Herald ImageQueen’s University is teaming up with The Heart and Stroke Foundation of Canada to test a potentially life-saving smartphone app called “PulsePoint” in Toronto.

The free app has been designed to notify people with CPR training when an emergency cardiac event is happening nearby.

Pulsepoint works in conjunction with the local 911 emergency service – as soon as they receive a call about sudden cardiac arrest, the app can be triggered to send out a text message reading “CPR NEEDED” to all PulsePoint users in the area simultaneous to emergency respondents also being dispatched to the scene.

Participants who receive the alert message can then access a map included in the app to show their current location and the location of the medical emergency.

The map also shows locations of public automated external defibrillators or AEDs. An AED automatically diagnoses issues, including arrhythmia, and uses electrical therapy to stop the arrhythmia.

Read the full article by Merideth Smith at the Kingston Herald.

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January 13, 2013 | by

PulsePoint set to begin Clinical Trial in Toronto, Canada

NIH Logo“Sudden cardiac arrest” occurs when someone’s heart stops beating unexpectedly. Each year, more than 45,000 Canadians have a cardiac arrest. A bystander can do three things to improve survival: Call 911,start chest compressions and apply a defibrillator. Together, these actions can increase survival by up to 800%. The problem is that bystanders to cardiac arrest only provide CPR in about 3 of every 10 cardiac arrest cases and AED use in about 3 of every 100 cardiac arrest cases. There are many people in the community who are trained and willing to provide help for cardiac arrest victims such as off-duty paramedics, fire fighters, nurses, etc. When a cardiac arrest occurs in the city, it is likely that one of these people is nearby, but unaware of the emergency. The PulsePoint smartphone application enables these people to be notified by the local emergency 911 service when there is a cardiac arrest near to them. It can be freely downloaded to several common types of smartphones. When there is a cardiac arrest emergency, all nearby PulsePoint users are sent an alert from the 911 service. When the phones receive the alert, they ring, vibrate and display a text message saying “CPR NEEDED”. The user’s current location and the exact location of the cardiac arrest are then displayed on a map. Nearby public access AEDs are also indicated on the map. The smartphone users can then go to provide chest compressions and use an AED while paramedics are on their way. A video at www.pulsepoint.org shows how this works. The objective of the investigators is to measure whether the PulsePoint smartphone application increases bystander CPR or AED use for victims of cardiac arrest outside the hospital. This project will happen in the City of Toronto. The investigators have a plan to get as many people as possible to download the application, focusing on health care professionals who know CPR. The investigators will set up a webpage that helps people download the software to their phone. The investigators will randomize 911 calls to have a PulsePoint alert sent or not. The investigators will use statistical analysis to measure whether sending an alert to a smartphone increases the chances of bystander resuscitation.

Sponsor
Queen’s University

Collaborator
Heart and Stroke Foundation of Ontario

Principal Investigator
Steven C Brooks, MD MHSc

For complete information view the Study Detail at U.S. National Institutes of Health.

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