May 24, 2013 | by

The Location of Cardiac Arrests Near You and Yelp’s Public Health Foray

Health 2.0 NewsThere was a lot of humility on stage when members of government organizations presented this week at the Healthy Communities Data Summit (HCDS) in San Francisco: “We could never pull this off on our own.” “We move at snail’s pace.” “We are poor.”

Like its cousin event Health Datapalooza, taking place in Washington, D.C. next month, HCDS’ purpose is to rally different groups around open data. Last year at Datapalooza, the government showcased applications and tools built with the data it had released. It called on private organizations to follow suit and to release their own data. And its strongest call was to anyone and everyone able to make useful things with that data. The message was to keep trying.

Government organizations in the Bay Area, and all local governments for that matter, have a big advantage over the federal government when making the same call to action. On their side is the fact that local developers are motivated to work on projects that can have a direct and observable impact on the place they call home.

Take the technology executive turned fire chief of the San Ramon Valley Fire Protection District in California. He was having lunch one day when he heard sirens nearby. They continued to get closer and closer. It wasn’t until the fire chief left the restaurant that he realized an emergency team was responding to a man who had gone into cardiac arrest next door. Had he known, he could have reached the man and started administering CPR long before EMS arrived.

Bradley Kreit, co-director of the Health Horizons Program at the Institute for the Future, told this story at HCDS. He went on to explain that the fire chief reacted by developing his own app for those very situations. First responders and people trained in CPR can now download the PulsePoint app, which alerts them in real time to cardiac arrest incidents nearby.

“First responder classes were so popular, they were booked out for two or three months in advance in San Ramon because people all of a sudden felt they could put the skill of learning first response to use,” Kreit said.

Read the full post by Laura Montini on Health 2.0 News.

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February 21, 2013 | by

Gov on the Go: Boosting Public Sector Productivity by Going Mobile

Governments have been less effective than the private sector in using information technology to reinvent work processes. Now, mobile technology offers an opportunity to hit the reset button, giving government the chance to redesign its business model by leveraging the power of individual citizens as co-creators.

ConstitutionMobile technology, a very powerful productivity booster, offers the public sector a chance to hit the reset button. It can not only improve internal communications and access to information within public agencies, but also enable the government to fully redesign service delivery by leveraging the power of citizens as co-creators. Mobile presents the government with a unique opportunity to drive efficiency and productivity and—at the same time—create vast improvements in the services it provides citizens. Our analysis shows that if mobile adoption rates in government were to double to 70 percent, additional value generated (in terms of government output) could exceed $50 billion annually.

Co-creation and co-production: Citizens as the solution.
Mobile technology allows governance to shift from one-way service delivery to a more collaborative, co-designed, and co-created model. As citizens come to play a more active role rather than being passive recipients, public service delivery can be transformed. Greater emphasis on creating solutions with citizens rather than just for them improves not just service delivery, but also the way the government approaches a problem. In San Jose, the PulsePoint mobile app—via sophisticated location-based services—alerts qualified citizens in a public place of the need for CPR. With the help of technology and citizen rescuers, governments can deliver effective emergency response without devoting significant new resources.

The except above is from William D. Eggers’ and Joshua Jaffe’s new Deloitte study, “Gov on the Go: Boosting Public Sector Productivity by Going Mobile” which features the PulsePoint app.

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