January 16, 2014 | by

Lifesaving CPR – there’s an app for that

Bystander CPRThe elderly suburban homeowner had completed several trips up and down an extension ladder while removing debris from the gutters of his house and had driven to a nearby hardware store to buy some needed items. As he entered the store, a sudden pain in his chest caused him to stagger a few steps before he slumped to the floor.

An employee noticed what happened and, seeing that the man didn’t move after collapsing, shouted to the store manager to call 911.

Within seconds, the alarm sounded at the nearest station where firefighter-paramedics were on duty and the crew scrambled to their emergency vehicles to respond. However, because the station was nearly three miles away, it would be several minutes before they would arrive.

But when the alarm sounded at the station, details of the apparent heart attack and where it had occurred triggered a special program linked to a smartphone carried by a businessman who had stopped to get a cup of coffee at a shop only a few yards from the hardware store.

The app on his smart phone told him where the apparent heart attack victim was and that the hardware store had an automated external defibrillator near its service desk.

Trained in CPR and how to use an AED, he rushed to the hardware store and treated the victim until paramedics arrived and took over.

Read the full article by Jim Erickson at Newsmagazine Network.

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December 24, 2013 | by

How CPR Can Save a Life

Image by Margaret RiegelMillions of people have been trained in CPR in recent decades, yet when people who aren’t in hospitals collapse from a sudden cardiac arrest, relatively few bystanders attempt resuscitation. Only one-fourth to one-third of those who might be helped by CPR receive it before paramedics arrive.

With so many people trained, why isn’t bystander CPR done more often?

For one thing, people forget what to do: the panic that may ensue is not conducive to accurate recall. Even those with medical training often can’t remember the steps just a few months after learning them. Rather than make a mistake, some bystanders simply do nothing beyond calling 911, even though emergency dispatchers often tell callers how to perform CPR.

Then there is the yuck factor: performing mouth-to-mouth resuscitation on a stranger. So pervasive is the feeling of reluctance that researchers decided to study whether rescue breathing is really necessary.

Two major studies, published in The New England Journal of Medicine in July 2010, clearly demonstrated that chest compressions alone were as good or even better than combining them with rescue breathing. In both studies, one conducted in Washington State and London and the other in Sweden, a slightly higher percentage of people who received only bystander chest compressions survived to be discharged from the hospital with good brain function.

When a person collapses suddenly because the heart’s electrical function goes awry, it turned out, there is often enough air in the lungs to sustain heart and brain function for a few minutes, as long as blood is pumped continuously to those vital organs. In addition, some people gasp while in cardiac arrest, which can bring more oxygen into the lungs. Indeed, the studies strongly suggested that interrupting chest compressions to administer rescue breaths actually diminishes the effectiveness of CPR in these patients.

Read the full article by Jane Brody at The New York Times.

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November 23, 2013 | by

Taking pulse of CPR

Clark County unveils smartphone app that can help save lives of cardiac arrest victims

Troy-Wayrynen_TheColumbian_11222013_300pxApproximately 360 to 370 people go into cardiac arrest annually in Clark County, and an average of 17 percent survive, Dr. Lynn Wittwer said Friday.

Wittwer, the county’s emergency medical services program director, said he was defining “survive” as patients who leave the hospital in good neurological condition.

While a 17 percent survival rate ranks higher than many places in the United States, Wittwer would like to increase the survival rate to 30 percent.

And a tool he believes will help was unveiled Friday at the Clark County Public Service Center: PulsePoint, a free smartphone app that alerts CPR-trained users to a cardiac arrest in public.

The Vancouver Fire Department has been working about two years to get the app activated here, ever since Chief Joe Molina heard about it in California. A $25,000 grant paid for the behind-the-scenes work that Clark Regional Emergency Services Agency had to do in order for the app to work countywide. When a call about a cardiac arrest goes to 911, users of PulsePoint who are within 400 yards of the call will be alerted.

Chief Nick Swinhart of the Camas-Washougal Fire Department demonstrated the app Friday.

Now that Vancouver police and sheriff’s patrol cars are equipped with automated external defibrillators, the PulsePoint app has the next greatest potential to increase survival rates for cardiac arrest victims, Swinhart said. Emergency responders are hoping residents who know CPR will download the app, greatly increasing the chance that if someone suffers cardiac arrest in public there will be someone able to respond within a few minutes.

After downloading the app, the user clicks “Clark County” from a list of agencies. Then, under settings, her or she selects “CPR” from call types.

The user can listen to emergency radio traffic if alerted to a nearby cardiac arrest call. A map will show the patient’s exact location.

Doug Smith-Lee, EMS manager for CRESA, reiterated the app only alerts people to calls made from nearby public locations.

Read the full article by Stephanie Rice at The Columbian. Photo by Roy Wayrynen.

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November 21, 2013 | by

Did you know your smartphone can help save a life?

Press conference at 9:00 am to announce PulsePoint coverage in Clark County, Washington

CRESAVancouver, Wash. – November 22, 2013 – Now your smartphone can help you save a life. A free smartphone app called PulsePoint is now available in Clark County, Washington. PulsePoint enables subscribers who are CPR-trained to be alerted to a cardiac arrest at the same time emergency responders are notified.

Registered users will be notified when a cardiac arrest has occurred in a public place within their vicinity. PulsePoint will give the citizen responder mapping directions, notify them of any automatic external defibrillators (AEDs) in at area and provide the radio traffic of the emergency responders.

Early CPR is the key if the victim is to survive. When a person goes into cardiac arrest, their heart, brain and other vital organs no longer receive oxygen. Researchers have found that without early CPR within the first 3 to 5 minutes, victims’ chances of survival are dramatically reduced.

The free PulsePoint app can be found in the Apple App store, or in Android Apps on Google Play. Within the app select Clark County, Washington – CRESA. You only need to be willing to do “Hands-Only” CPR. According to the American Heart Association, Hands-Only CPR has been shown to be as effective as conventional CPR in the first minutes of cardiac arrest.

Subscribers can also view active fire and emergency medical incidents and monitor emergency radio traffic.

Businesses, schools and other public sites with an AED are asked to visit CRESA website to see if their AED is listed in the PulsePoint database. Register your AED here.

Play a key role in cardiac arrest victim’s survival – Learn CPR and become a PulsePoint subscriber today.

Media Events and PSA
Media are invited to attend a press conference where the CPR alert for cardiac arrests will officially launch.

What: Press Conference to unveil the PulsePoint smartphone app.
When: Friday, November 22nd at 9:00 am.
Where: Clark County Public Service Center, Rm 679, 1300 Franklin, Vancouver WA.
Activities: CRESA’s PulsePoint PSA unveiled; cardiac arrest survivor speaks on the importance of citizen response and CPR; PulsePoint demonstration

About the PulsePoint Foundation
PulsePoint is a 501(c)(3) non-profit foundation based in the San Francisco Bay Area. Its mission is to make it much easier for citizens who are trained in CPR to use their life saving skills to do just that…save lives! Through the use of modern, location-aware mobile devices PulsePoint is building applications that work with local public safety agencies to improve communications with citizens and empower them to help reduce the millions of annual deaths from sudden cardiac arrest. Learn more at www.pulsepoint.org or join the conversation at www.facebook.com/PulsePoint and @PulsePoint.

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View the CRESA/PulsePoint Public Service Announcement

Contact
Doug Smith-Lee
Clark Regional Emergency Services Agency
doug.smith-lee@clark.wa.gov
(360) 737-1911 ext. 3949
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November 11, 2013 | by

Here’s how to save a life

Daniel and Charlette SandersAfter Scott Hansen’s heart gave out last year, strangers used its power to give him another chance at life. When Bill Pelow’s heart stopped in 2011, Daniel Velazquez became his lifeline because of it.

Charlette Sanders isn’t a widow today and her children have a father because she learned the lifesaving technique during an emergency conversation with 911 operator Amy Breitenbach.

Cardiopulmonary resuscitation, better known as CPR, the only known method of keeping someone alive until medically necessary treatment can be administered, saves tens of thousands of lives in heart-related crises annually in the United States alone.

But as wonderful as that is, it is also true that tens of thousands of other Americans die because CPR isn’t used. The American Heart Association reports that less than one-third of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest victims — there are about 400,000 each year — receive CPR from a bystander.

David Slattery, Las Vegas Fire and Rescue’s medical director, said studies show that Americans find intervening “very scary” because they’re not medically trained and that fear often paralyzes them.

Considering that cardiac arrest survival falls an estimated 7 percent to 10 percent for every minute without CPR and that it takes an average of four to six minutes across the country for rescue personnel to arrive, the low rate of bystander CPR plays a critical role on outcomes.

Less than 8 percent of people who suffer cardiac arrest outside the hospital survive.

Read the full post by Paul Harasim at the Las Vegas Review-Journal.

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August 14, 2013 | by

Saving lives through an app

ArvadaPressSmart phones these days can do much more than just making a call — and now that includes saving a life.

The Arvada Fire Protection District launched its own channel on the PulsePoint smart phone app on Aug. 5.

Once someone downloads the free app and sets Arvada Fire as their host location, the app alerts the user if a person in a nearby public place goes into cardiac arrest and needs hands-only CPR.

“All you need is CPR knowledge, you don’t have to be certified, just have knowledge of how to do chest compressions and it will notify you if CPR is needed in a public place within walking distance of where you are,” said Arvada Fire public information officer Scott Pribble.

Using GPS technology, the app notifies users about emergencies within about a 1,000 foot radius of where they are in a public place, such as a store, restaurant or park.

“I know it has saved lives,” Pribble said.

Read the full story by Sara Van Cleve at Our Colorado News.

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August 5, 2013 | by

PulsePoint app tells users someone nearby needs CPR

Fox31DenverARVADA, Colo. — The Arvada Fire Department is teaming up with a smart phone app developer in an effort to mix altruism with geo-location technology to save lives.
PulsePoint is a free app that can help someone who is having sudden cardiac arrest.

Users register through the app that they know CPR. The app will then notify the user if someone nearby is having cardiac arrest. It gives directions to the victim as well as show any nearby defibrillators.

The app is activated by 911 dispatchers and alerts go to anyone within walking distance of the victim, that is CPR trained and is willing to help.

The notifications are also only made if the victim is in a public place such as a mall or park, said Arvada fire spokesman Scott Pribble.

Read the full story by Thomas Hendrick at FOX31 Denver (KDVR).

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August 5, 2013 | by

New Arvada Fire Channel app launched by Arvada Fire could save a life

ARVADA – Arvada Fire launched the PulsePoint application on the Arvada Fire Channel, which could potentially help save lives.

Click here if video not displaying properly.

The free application notifies registered users of a cardiac arrest that has occurred in a public place nearby. PulsePoint puts out a map giving directions to the person, the location of the AEDs in the area, and in the future, it will also provide the radio traffic of the emergency responders.

To sign up for this application, a person has to be willing to do “hands-only” CPR, and the Good Samaritan Law covers anyone who is willing to help.

For iPhone users, PulsePoint can be searched and directly downloaded from the App Store. Android users can find the app under the same name on Google Play.

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August 5, 2013 | by

Turn Your Smart Phone into a Life Saver

Arvada FPD LogoARVADA – Your smart phone can do so many things from keeping your life on schedule, to checking your social media status and even playing games. Now your phone can help you save a life.

On Monday, August 5th, Arvada Fire will launch the Arvada Fire channel on the smart phone application, PulsePoint. The free PulsePoint app, which is available in your phone’s app store, will notify registered users of a cardiac arrest that has occurred in a public place that is in their vicinity. The app will give the citizen responder mapping directions, it will notify them of any automatic external defibrillators (AEDs) that are in the area and will, in the near future, even provide the radio traffic of the emergency responders.
When a person goes into sudden cardiac arrest, their heart, lungs and brain no longer receive the oxygen that they need to survive. For every minute that they do not receive chest compressions, their chance of survival decreases by 10%. Quick math would tell you that they would have zero chance of survival after just 10 minutes. That is why it is so important to get this process started before emergency responders arrive on the scene.

So, you want to help but mouth-to-mouth grosses you out? No problem. To sign up for this app, you only need to be willing to do “Hands-Only” CPR. According to the American Heart Association, Hands-Only CPR has been shown to be as effective as conventional CPR in the first few minutes of an out-of-hospital sudden cardiac arrest. Have you been trained in CPR but your card has expired? No problem. You do not need to be CPR certified to participate in this program. The Good Samaritan Law covers anyone who is willing to help as long as they do not attempt to do more than they are trained to do.

We are available to do interviews for the morning shows if you are interested. Shots could include an interview about how the app works and a brief lesson on “Hands-Only” CPR.

ABOUT PULSEPOINT
PulsePoint is a 501(c)(3) non-profit foundation based in the San Francisco Bay Area. Their mission is to make it much easier for citizens who are trained in CPR to use their life saving skills to do just that…save lives! Through the use of modern, location-aware mobile devices PulsePoint is building applications that work with local public safety agencies to improve communications with citizens and empower them to help reduce the millions of annual deaths from sudden cardiac arrest.

See more at: www.pulsepoint.org

Contact
Scott Pribble, Public Information Officer
Deanna Harrington, Public Information Officer
303-425-9203

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June 6, 2013 | by

Pulse3 Foundation expanding the PulsePoint smartphone app in Michigan

logo-pulse3_foundationSAGINAW, MI — Heart disease is taking a toll on the Great Lakes Bay Region, and the Michigan CardioVascular Institute Foundation is changing to take it on.

The foundation is changing its name to Pulse3 Foundation, said President and Chief Executive Officer Diane Fong. The private foundation will become a public charity, Fong said, and add five members to its board of directors from Saginaw, Bay and Midland counties.

“Heart disease is bigger than one organization,” she said. “Our goals, passion and commitment remains unchanged.”

The death rate from heart disease is higher in Michigan and the region than the national average.

Pulse3’s vision of a community free of heart disease remains strong with community-based, widespread, regional support, Fong said.

The foundation’s programs include the Run for Your Heart Fitness and Wellness Program, Run for Your Heart Community Races, Shocks & Saves alert system for cardiopulmonary resuscitation and automated external defibrillator emergencies, deployment of AED units in the community, CPR/ AED training, community education programs, college scholarships and continuing education programs for healthcare professionals.

One example of expanded programming is the Run for Your Heart program, Fong said. The foundation will partner with the Michigan State University Extension’s diabetes prevention program. The first 20 people who sign up will receive a scholarship to Pulse3’s Run for Your Heart program.

Fong said the charity also is expanding the PulsePoint smartphone app to Isabella, Clare and Gratiot counties. The app sends alerts to people trained in CPR when someone in public collapses from cardiac arrest.

Read the full post by The Saginaw News reporter Lindsay Knake on MLive.

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