April 4, 2013 | by

Nurse uses lifesaving app to find, try to help man in cardiac arrest

Heather Rom (Portland Tribune)Heather Roms was inside her car near Pediatric Dental when she saw and heard the alert on her phone that someone nearby was having a cardiac emergency. The app gave her the address and location, and Roms quickly drove to Shari’s Restaurant, where a man was having a cardiac emergency.

A labor and delivery nurse who’s accustomed to using the most modern technology to save newborns in jeopardy relied on just her own skills to try and save a man’s life last week.

Heather Roms, 39, of West Linn, was just leaving her daughter’s dentist appointment about 9 a.m. March 27 on Southwest Town Center Loop in Wilsonville when she received an alert on her smartphone that someone nearby was having a cardiac emergency.

It was the first time she had seen the alert on her phone, and she guessed she must be pretty close to where it was taking place.

At first, the PulsePoint application showed only the address of the location where the emergency was happening. Those who subscribe to the app receive notification of the emergency at the same time as first responders.

In this instance, first responders were paramedics from Tualatin Valley Fire & Rescue and AMR ambulance.

At first, Roms wondered whether she should respond, not knowing how instantaneously she received the alert.

Read the full article by Michelle Te at the Portland Tribune.

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March 28, 2013 | by

Oregon Responder Alerted to Cardiac Arrest by PulsePoint

TVF&R LogoAn Oregon citizen, alerted to a cardiac arrest at a Wilsonville restaurant by a special signal on her smartphone, became the first citizen responder to arrive at the scene of a medical emergency on Wednesday using the PulsePoint alert notification system.

Tualatin Valley Fire and Rescue in Tigard, along with American Medical Response, were dispatched to a cardiac arrest at Shari’s Restaurant at 9:02 a.m. in Wilsonville. Simultaneously, TVF&R’s PulsePoint mobile app notified three nearby citizen responders that someone near their locations needed CPR.

Heather Roms, a registered nurse for Legacy Emanuel Medical Center in Portland, was leaving a nearby business when she received the alert and responded to the restaurant. Upon arriving, she began hands-only CPR until EMS crews arrived.

Read the full article on Firehouse.com.

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March 10, 2013 | by

Can a new smartphone application being piloted in Michigan save lives?

Blue Cross Blue ShieldFor residents of Saginaw County, the odds of surviving sudden cardiac arrest are starting to get a lot better.

An initiative spearheaded by the Michigan CardioVascular Institute Foundation and Mobile Medical Response has made Saginaw County the pilot for a smartphone application called PulsePoint, the only county in Michigan involved in testing the technology. In fact, this is only the 12th implementation of the application in the country, and the first in the Midwest. The initiative was introduced during MCVI’s Shocks and Saves charity hockey game on Feb. 2, an event sponsored by BCBSM.

The premise behind the app is simple. People trained in basic CPR are encouraged to download the PulsePoint app. When someone goes into cardiac arrest, people who are trained and who are currently near the victim are messaged through the app so that CPR can be administered until the ambulance arrives.

“During cardiac arrest, seconds really do matter. Immediate chest compressions can triple the chances of survival. Waiting for the ambulance is not the answer — it takes a community to combat sudden cardiac arrest,” says Lynn M. Schutter, director of community relations/strategic planning for MMR.

Read the full article by David Lingholm at MI Blues Perspectives.

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February 15, 2013 | by

PulsePoint app notifies trained bystanders of people in need of CPR

Midland Daily News LogoOfficials in Saginaw hope a smartphone app will be able to connect people trained in CPR with those facing sudden cardiac arrest in the community.

The Michigan CardioVascular Institute Foundation and Mobile MedicalResponse recently announced they are offering the PulsePoint app for use in Saginaw County. PulsePoint, designed for both Android and iPhone, uses GPS to notify people with CPR training when an emergency cardiac event is happening near them.

Diane Fong, MCVI Foundation executive director, said the project will be piloted in Saginaw and could some day expand to the rest of the Great Lakes Bay Region.

The idea is simple, Fong said. If someone collapses and isn’t breathing, people would call 911 as usual and an ambulance would be dispatched to the scene. A message would simultaneously sent to PulsePoint, and the phone app would use GPS to notify users within a quarter-mile of the scene that an incident is taking place. The app includes a map showing the location of the victim and the nearest automated external defibrillator, or AED. A person using the app could locate the person in need, begin CPR and deploy the AED before the ambulance arrives.

“If you can start CPR immediately, you can double or triple the chance of survival,” Fong said.

Read the full article by Tony Lascari at the Midland Daily News.

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February 9, 2013 | by

Contra Costa Fire Districts Launch Life-Saving Mobile App

CCC Fire Agency LogosA new cellphone app launched by fire departments throughout Contra Costa County this week is designed to give everyday citizens a chance to save lives.

The PulsePoint app notifies smartphone users who are trained in CPR and willing to respond to emergencies when someone nearby is suffering a cardiac emergency and may require CPR.

Watch PulsePoint’s video

With the help of the app, trained people in close proximity to a possible cardiac emergency can begin life-saving measures that may stabilize a heart attack victim while waiting for emergency responders to arrive, according to Contra Costa County Fire Protection District Fire Marshal Lewis Broschard.

Users of the app can check their phones to see the exact location of a reported cardiac emergency and how far arriving emergency responders are from that location at any given time.

“The deployment of the PulsePoint app is the next step in developing a comprehensive network of life-saving efforts that includes fire department first responders, ambulance transport providers, the placement of publicly accessible AEDs, hospital emergency departments and members of the public who are trained in CPR,” said Contra Costa County Fire Protection District Chief Daryl Louder.

Read the full article by Bay City News at Walnut Creek Patch.

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February 2, 2013 | by

Saginaw to launch PulsePoint smartphone app, alert bystanders to assist with CPR

MCVI Foundation LogoSAGINAW, MI — It’s going to be easier to save a life in Saginaw.

And yes, there is an app for that.

The smart phone application is PulsePoint, and the Michigan CardioVascular Institute Foundation and Mobile Medical Response are launching it at the sixth annual MCVI Foundation Shocks & Saves charity hockey game, at 4:30 p.m. Feb. 2, prior to the Saginaw Spirit game.

“We’re trying to increase bystander care while ambulance is on the way and reduce the number of people who die from cardiac arrest,” said MCVI Foundation Executive Director Diane Fong.

The free phone application is available for download from the Apple store and Google Play for Android phones.

If someone is out shopping and collapses from cardiac arrest the PulsePoint app would sent out an alert to trained CPR responders who are in the area as soon as the ambulance is dispatched, Fong said.

Cardiac arrest kills about 1,000 people per day across the country. There is a survival rate of about 8 percent, but a victim who receives immediate CPR sees their survival rates triple.

Of people who go into cardiac arrest in public places, 32 percent receive from bystanders, Fong said.

PulsePoint only shows cardiac arrests in public places, she said. The app also would show the location nearby AEDs.

So far, Fong said, the app will show 200 known AEDs in the county, and she encourages people to contact her to add locations of more of the devices.

“It stands to reason that if we can provide more immediate CPR and more immediate defibrillation, see those numbers decrease,” Fong said.

Read the full article by Lindsay Knake, at Michigan Live.

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February 1, 2013 | by

Will you answer the CPR call?

TIMES PHOTO: JONATHAN HOUSE - Tualatin Valley Fire & Rescue Fire Chief Mike Duyck Tualatin Valley Fire & Rescue wants to know if you are willing to help save a life.

Specifically, if you are willing to serve as a potential citizen rescuer on standby — ready to jump into action and perform CPR in the event someone nearby goes into sudden cardiac arrest in a public place.

The fire district on Tuesday released a new PulsePoint smartphone application that alerts CPR-trained bystanders when someone within a quarter-mile radius is in need of their aid at the precise moment emergency dispatchers activate TVF&R’s emergency crews.

The app can be downloaded free from the Apple App Store or Android Apps on Google Play.

As the first fire department in Oregon to introduce this lifesaving tool to its 220-square-mile service area, the app uses sophisticated location-based software when someone calls 911 to direct bystanders to the location of the person in need of CPR as well as the nearest accessible automated external defibrillator.

Once the citizen rescuer arrives, an emergency dispatcher on the phone with the witness who called 911 will provide instruction on how to administer hands-only CPR by pushing hard and fast on the center of the patient’s chest. Meanwhile, the rescuer can inform someone else about where to find the nearest AED.

“We can’t stress enough how critical it is for people to start CPR before we arrive,” said Mark Charleston, TVF&R’s emergency medical services battalion chief. “Every minute a person in sudden cardiac arrest goes without CPR or a shock to the heart from an AED, the chance of survival goes down by 10 percent.

“Our crews are running about three to four minutes to arrive on scene once they are dispatched. If someone starts performing CPR, it ensures we have a viable patient and the patient’s chances of being resuscitated improve. Having people willing to assist us will undoubtedly save lives.”

Read the full article by Christina Lent, at the Portland Tribune.

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