August 24, 2013 | by

Mobile innovations for emergency response highlighted at Brookings event

BrookingsPanelRPGovernment should form public-private partnerships to incorporate new mobile technologies into emergency response, said panelists at a Brookings Institution event in July.

“Government’s got to create the environment for these new technologies…to ensure the safety of the public or to allow the public to ensure its own safety,” said Jamie Barnett, a former head of the Federal Communications Commission’s Public Safety and Homeland Security Bureau. “There’s so many out there that need to be discovered and found.”

Private companies can build on top of platforms such as GPS and the forthcoming FirstNet system, but they can’t provide the level of resources that government can to lay the initial foundation, said Richard Price, a former fire chief in Contra Costa County, Calif. Price is now president of the nonprofit PulsePoint Foundation, whose mobile application lets individuals who can perform CPR receive notifications if someone nearby is having a cardiac arrest.

The app’s users may be close to the patient and able to provide care while traditional first responders are still en route. Plus, many of them are in fact off-duty first responders, Price said. The app also directs users to the nearest portable defibrillator.

Price added, “It kind of redefines what it means to be a witnessed arrest,” a heart attack seen by a bystander who knows CPR. “You only have to be nearby now, not at the exact right place at the exact right time, so the odds are much greater.”

Suzy DeFrancis, the chief public affairs officer at the American Red Cross, detailed some of what her organization has learned incorporating social media into its response efforts.

Read more at FierceMobileGovernment.

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August 14, 2013 | by

Saving lives through an app

ArvadaPressSmart phones these days can do much more than just making a call — and now that includes saving a life.

The Arvada Fire Protection District launched its own channel on the PulsePoint smart phone app on Aug. 5.

Once someone downloads the free app and sets Arvada Fire as their host location, the app alerts the user if a person in a nearby public place goes into cardiac arrest and needs hands-only CPR.

“All you need is CPR knowledge, you don’t have to be certified, just have knowledge of how to do chest compressions and it will notify you if CPR is needed in a public place within walking distance of where you are,” said Arvada Fire public information officer Scott Pribble.

Using GPS technology, the app notifies users about emergencies within about a 1,000 foot radius of where they are in a public place, such as a store, restaurant or park.

“I know it has saved lives,” Pribble said.

Read the full story by Sara Van Cleve at Our Colorado News.

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August 5, 2013 | by

PulsePoint app tells users someone nearby needs CPR

Fox31DenverARVADA, Colo. — The Arvada Fire Department is teaming up with a smart phone app developer in an effort to mix altruism with geo-location technology to save lives.
PulsePoint is a free app that can help someone who is having sudden cardiac arrest.

Users register through the app that they know CPR. The app will then notify the user if someone nearby is having cardiac arrest. It gives directions to the victim as well as show any nearby defibrillators.

The app is activated by 911 dispatchers and alerts go to anyone within walking distance of the victim, that is CPR trained and is willing to help.

The notifications are also only made if the victim is in a public place such as a mall or park, said Arvada fire spokesman Scott Pribble.

Read the full story by Thomas Hendrick at FOX31 Denver (KDVR).

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August 5, 2013 | by

New Arvada Fire Channel app launched by Arvada Fire could save a life

ARVADA – Arvada Fire launched the PulsePoint application on the Arvada Fire Channel, which could potentially help save lives.

Click here if video not displaying properly.

The free application notifies registered users of a cardiac arrest that has occurred in a public place nearby. PulsePoint puts out a map giving directions to the person, the location of the AEDs in the area, and in the future, it will also provide the radio traffic of the emergency responders.

To sign up for this application, a person has to be willing to do “hands-only” CPR, and the Good Samaritan Law covers anyone who is willing to help.

For iPhone users, PulsePoint can be searched and directly downloaded from the App Store. Android users can find the app under the same name on Google Play.

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August 5, 2013 | by

Turn Your Smart Phone into a Life Saver

Arvada FPD LogoARVADA – Your smart phone can do so many things from keeping your life on schedule, to checking your social media status and even playing games. Now your phone can help you save a life.

On Monday, August 5th, Arvada Fire will launch the Arvada Fire channel on the smart phone application, PulsePoint. The free PulsePoint app, which is available in your phone’s app store, will notify registered users of a cardiac arrest that has occurred in a public place that is in their vicinity. The app will give the citizen responder mapping directions, it will notify them of any automatic external defibrillators (AEDs) that are in the area and will, in the near future, even provide the radio traffic of the emergency responders.
When a person goes into sudden cardiac arrest, their heart, lungs and brain no longer receive the oxygen that they need to survive. For every minute that they do not receive chest compressions, their chance of survival decreases by 10%. Quick math would tell you that they would have zero chance of survival after just 10 minutes. That is why it is so important to get this process started before emergency responders arrive on the scene.

So, you want to help but mouth-to-mouth grosses you out? No problem. To sign up for this app, you only need to be willing to do “Hands-Only” CPR. According to the American Heart Association, Hands-Only CPR has been shown to be as effective as conventional CPR in the first few minutes of an out-of-hospital sudden cardiac arrest. Have you been trained in CPR but your card has expired? No problem. You do not need to be CPR certified to participate in this program. The Good Samaritan Law covers anyone who is willing to help as long as they do not attempt to do more than they are trained to do.

We are available to do interviews for the morning shows if you are interested. Shots could include an interview about how the app works and a brief lesson on “Hands-Only” CPR.

ABOUT PULSEPOINT
PulsePoint is a 501(c)(3) non-profit foundation based in the San Francisco Bay Area. Their mission is to make it much easier for citizens who are trained in CPR to use their life saving skills to do just that…save lives! Through the use of modern, location-aware mobile devices PulsePoint is building applications that work with local public safety agencies to improve communications with citizens and empower them to help reduce the millions of annual deaths from sudden cardiac arrest.

See more at: www.pulsepoint.org

Contact
Scott Pribble, Public Information Officer
Deanna Harrington, Public Information Officer
303-425-9203

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July 1, 2013 | by

Mobile Technology’s Role in Natural Disasters and Public Safety Preparedness and Response

Chief Price to speak at the Brookings Institution on July 16 in Washington, DC. Register to attend the event in-person or to watch the live webcast.

Brookings InstitutionFrom Hurricane Sandy to international catastrophes such as the tsunami in Japan, governments are increasingly using mobile technology in natural disaster preparedness and public safety response. With an estimated 6 billion mobile phone users worldwide, mobile communications is fast proving to be the most effective and efficient means of reaching and informing the public when disaster strikes. How is mobile technology being used before, during, and after a crisis situation in the United States and around the world? How has mobile communications’ role in catastrophic situations changed, and how are public safety organizations utilizing this technology to make citizens safer and better prepared? What are the costs and benefits of using mobile technology to ready for and react to a major emergency?

On July 16, as part of the Mobile Economy Project, the Center for Technology Innovation at Brookings will host a discussion on mobile technology and its evolving role in disaster and public safety. A panel of experts will discuss how mobile devices aid in planning for and reacting to a crisis, and how do they empower emergency management agencies and officials, first responders, and the public to tackle a variety of natural disasters and security crises.

After the program, panelists will take audience questions. This event will be live webcast.

Participants can follow the conversation on Twitter using the hashtag #TechCTI.

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September 18, 2012 | by

White House Showcases Cool Tools For Public Safety

Chief Price on stage at White House DatapaloozaIt’s not easy following Todd Park, the federal government’s chief technology officer, and his breathless on-stage enthusiasm for promoting technical innovation in government and the virtues of collaboration.

Park clearly found an avid proponent, however, in Seth Harris, U.S. Deputy Secretary of Labor, who made a persuasive case last week in describing the inherent logic for government and the private sector to work jointly in turning information into useful tools for the American public and the U.S. economy.

Harris was one of nearly two dozen public officials and innovators invited by the White House to make presentations at the latest in a series of White House “Datapalooza” events Sept. 14 – this one aimed at showcasing how government data is being used to improve public safety. The half-day symposium was hosted by the White House Office of Public Engagement, the Office of Science and Technology Policy and the U.S. Department of Transportation.

Read the rest of this article by Wyatt Kash at AOL Government.

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