San Diego Logo Trio

August 25, 2015 | by

Thousands of San Diegans Register for Life-Saving Apps

More than 35,000 San Diego County residents now receive alerts on their phones letting them know of a chance to potentially save someone’s life nearby.

That’s how many people have downloaded and registered for the PulsePoint Respond app in the past year since it launched locally. The app, which is free, lets users trained in CPR know when and where their help is needed.

A second app, called PulsePoint AED, lets users know where automatic external defibrillators (AED) are located nearby. The chance of saving a victim of cardiac arrest doubles when AEDs are used in addition to CPR.

The mobile apps were launched in July 2014 and March 2015 in a partnership between the County, City of San Diego, San Diego County Fire Chiefs’ Association, American Medical Response, Rural/Metro and the PulsePoint Foundation.

San Diego PulsePoint Launch

More than 1,800 local AEDs are also now listed in the PulsePoint AED app. As part of the crowdsourcing campaign in March, participants competed for prizes by using the app to identify both new and existing AEDs to expand the database of AED locations. The effort increased awareness about both apps and resulted in the registration of dozens of new AEDs.

“The more users we can add, and AEDs we can register, the more lives we have a chance to save,” said San Diego County Board of Supervisors Chairman Bill Horn. “By working together to introduce and integrate this technology into the community, we are making San Diego a safer place to live.”

San Diego iPhone 6 AED MapThe crowdsourcing campaign participants received “points” for registering AEDs in the community. The Wireless Foundation launched an accompanying Twitter campaign to encourage San Diego residents to join the contest. Joe Ferraro, an Assistant Chief of Emergency Medical Services for the Miramar Fire Department, received the most points and won a new iPad, courtesy of American Medical Response. Other prizes included a signed Chargers football, signed Padres hat, Balboa Park and Midway Museum passes and Amazon gift cards.

“I want to thank all of the county residents who helped us add and verify AEDs through PulsePoint,” said Supervisor Ron Roberts, who led the effort to bring PulsePoint and its sister app to all of San Diego County. “Their efforts are making a difference. Chief Ferraro himself is a great example of how our firefighters are embracing PulsePoint. It’s also exciting to see the two apps bringing the community and first responders together in a joint effort.”

The PulsePoint app has proven especially popular with emergency responders.

“PulsePoint is something all of the local fire agencies are excited about,” said Don Butz, President of the San Diego County Fire Chiefs’ Association and Chief of Viejas Fire Department. “We’ve encouraged all of our firefighters and paramedics to download the app. It’s our way of always being available to save a life, even when we’re not on-duty. I encourage every resident who has CPR training to download the app and join our effort.”

The way the app works is all registered users who are within a quarter mile of someone in cardiac distress receives an alert on their phone asking them to respond. Up pops a map on your smartphone, as well as the location of an AED device if one is nearby.

Both of the free apps are available through Google Play or the Apple App Store. While the campaign is over, it’s still important to register AEDs with PulsePoint AED as it could save the life of someone in need. San Diegans are also encouraged to get trained in CPR, learn how to use AEDs, and sign up to receive the PulsePoint alerts and respond if needed. The American Red Cross, American Heart Association, and San Diego Project Heartbeat provide CPR and AED trainings throughout the year.

###

Source: San Diego County News Center

Full Story
San Diego Logo Trio

July 28, 2014 | by

San Diego County, City, Fire Partners Activate Life-saving CPR App

Technology Helps Citizens Become Heroes

NEWS RELEASE
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
July 28, 2014
Contacts: County: Michele Clock 619-531-4506
City: Lee Swanson 619-533-3780

Every minute a victim of sudden cardiac arrest waits for CPR, their chance of survival drops by up to 10 percent.

After four to six minutes, brain damage begins to occur.

After 10 minutes, it’s often too late. Few resuscitation attempts succeed.

Now PulsePoint, an innovative new smartphone application, lets citizens trained in CPR know when their help is needed, allowing them to step in during those critical moments before a paramedic arrives. It is now available in the San Diego region, thanks to the County and a coalition of local agencies.

County Supervisors Ron Roberts and Bill Horn, San Diego Mayor Kevin L. Faulconer, San Diego County Fire Chiefs’ Association President Dave Hanneman and other local fire and government officials on Monday announced the arrival of the cutting-edge technology at a news conference at San Diego Fire-Rescue Department’s Fire Station 1.

“Sudden cardiac arrest is a leading cause of death in our country, and just 8 percent of those who experience it survive,” Supervisor Ron Roberts said. “We can do better. This app can help us change these grim statistics.”

Full Story

The region is one of the largest in the U.S. to launch the app, which was developed by the Pleasanton, California-based nonprofit PulsePoint Foundation and distributed by Redmond, Washington-based emergency medical device company Physio-Control, Inc. San Diego joins the more than 500 localities around the nation that have begun using the app. Also available on Monday is compression-only CPR training from local ambulance providers Rural/Metro and American Medical Response.

“San Diego is again on health care’s leading edge by adopting this technology,” said Mayor Kevin L. Faulconer. “It is going to allow us as citizens to help one another in previously unimaginable ways. But it’s up to us to get trained, download this tool and use it.”

Mayor Kevin Faulconer

“Most of us have a friend or loved one who has suffered with a heart condition,” said Supervisor Bill Horn. “Sudden cardiac arrest can happen to one of those individuals, or out of the blue to any of us, at any time. You never know who or when you may be in the right place at the right time to help someone, thanks to this app.”

When a 9-1-1 call for sudden cardiac arrest comes in, an alert goes to the app at the same time first responders are dispatched. Citizens who are signed up for the app and nearby the incident are notified of the location of the victim as well as the closest publicly accessible AEDs.

How effective the app is in a community depends on citizen involvement. Get trained in CPR and sign up to receive the alerts. The American Red Cross, American Heart Association, and San Diego Project Heartbeat provide trainings throughout the year. You never know, you may just help save someone’s life! So please download the app through Google play or the Apple App store. Also available through PulsePoint is a companion app called PulsePoint AED, which allows the public to register the locations of publicly accessible AEDs in their community.

Cox Communications is supporting this program by airing this public service announcement (PSA) promoting the PulsePoint app on local cable channels. For more information, visit the County’s PulsePoint information page or to download the apps, visit PulsePoint.

Less Story

July 25, 2014 | by

County, City, Fire Partners to Launch Life-saving CPR App

Region is among the largest in U.S. to adopt technology

MEDIA ADVISORY
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
July 25, 2014
Contacts: County: Michele Clock 619-531-4506
City: Lee Swanson 619-533-3780

WHAT: The County of San Diego, City of San Diego, San Diego County Fire Chiefs’ Association and other local agencies have joined forces to launch a regional smartphone application that lets citizens trained in CPR know when their assistance is urgently needed in the critical moments before paramedics arrive. The app, called PulsePoint, was designed to quickly bring help to victims of Sudden Cardiac Arrest (SCA). The region is one of the largest in the U.S. to activate the app. Officials will discuss the technology’s potential, how citizens can use it and where to learn compression-only CPR tactics for free starting Monday (note: not for certification).

WHEN: Monday, July 28, 11 a.m.

WHERE: San Diego Fire-Rescue Department’s Fire Station 1
1222 First Ave., San Diego, CA 92101

WHO: Kevin L. Faulconer, San Diego Mayor
Ron Roberts, County Supervisor (District 4)
Bill Horn, County Supervisor (District 5)
Chief Dave Hanneman, San Diego County Fire Chiefs’ Association President
Tom Johnson, Sudden Cardiac Arrest Survivor

WHY: Sudden Cardiac Arrest is one of the leading causes of death in the United States. Many adults are trained in CPR, but often are not aware of when their help is needed. Less than 8 percent of victims survive the condition. But a coalition of local leaders hopes to change that with this app.

VISUALS: Emergency response officials, firefighters, San Diego Fire-Rescue Department fire station backdrop, compression-only CPR demonstration available, Automated External Defibrillator (AED) display, posters of smartphone with app on the screen and infographic. Also Monday: Members of the public learning compression-only CPR and how to use the new PulsePoint app at the County Administration Center’s Waterfront Park (south side) noon – 3 p.m. taught by Rural/Metro, and the public learning compression-only CPR at Moonlight Beach in Encinitas 10 a.m. – 4 p.m. taught by American Medical Response, City of Encinitas Lifeguards and City of Encinitas Fire Department.

For more information or to download the apps, visit PulsePoint. Cox Communications will air this PSA on the app locally.

Full Story