October 8, 2013 | by

The GovLab Living Labs: Experiments in Smarter Governance

GovLab LogoImproving people’s lives by changing how we govern.

Current societal problems demand radical innovation in how we govern. Policy makers around the world are facing increasingly complex and interconnected societal challenges: How can we provide health care for everyone at lower cost; reduce poverty and economic inequality; reduce and prevent obesity; redesign urban environments; fight global warming; combat the threat of terrorism; increase creative flourishing and human well-being and do more in our communities with scarcer resources? Unfortunately, we are trying to address 21st century problems with outdated institutional designs:

  • Technology has lowered the cost and ease of communication, yet we still have an 18th century model of representative democracy where participation is limited to occasional voting and affords few opportunities for people to participate in governing.
  • Technology is enabling diverse experts with different skills and experience to work together, across a distance, yet we still have a 19th century model of centralized and professional bureaucracy.
  • Research demonstrates that people can and will collaborate in purposeful groups on- and off-line, yet we still have a political culture dominated by entrenched parties and deep pockets that treats a talented public as outsiders and impedes collaboration.

In our current model of government, an elite group of elected and appointed leaders is supposed to solve problems without significantly engaging the insights, experience, and brainpower of the public.

We don’t need collaboration because of a shortage of information. We produce every two days more data than we created between the dawn of humanity and today.[i] Rather, we need to engage outside expertise in order to identify relevant, specific and timely information that aligns to decision-making. But citizen engagement hasn’t led to leaders being able to use collective intelligence to govern better.

At the Governance Lab at the Wagner School of Public Service of New York University, we want to explore whether targeting opportunities to participate based on people’s expertise – not their credentials alone but also their wisdom, know-how and experience – might make it possible for institutions to work with citizens more collaboratively to the end of solving real problems, and improving people’s lives.

We are testing and analyzing how mayors and CEOs alike can leverage new tools and techniques to find those with formal training and informal know how. We want to learn how we can engage citizens and community members better who are more likely to contribute their talents in ways that speak to their passions and abilities. Through experimentation with real world institutions we want to identify when and how crowdsourcing wisely, rather than just widely, works and why.

Tapping Intelligence and Expertise: Active Citizenship

A life-saving app called PulsePoint is demonstrating the power of tapping a community’s unique talents. In 350 communities across 14 states, PulsePoint enables local 911 emergency services to notify registered and trained CPR users, which includes off-duty doctors, nurses, EMTs, police, and others, to come to the aid of their neighbors. When someone is having a cardiac arrest, PulsePoint sends out an alert to qualified people in the area: CPR NEEDED. PulsePoint has enabled 6,000 citizen rescuers to come to the aid of victims in cardiac arrest.

Read the full post by Beth Noveck in the GovLab Blog.

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September 9, 2013 | by

PulsePoint Foundation Announces Significant Usability Enhancements in Latest Release

New app version includes most requested features within a completely redesigned user interface

PulsePoint App LVFRLAS VEGAS (September 9, 2013) – At EMS World today the PulsePoint Foundation debuted a completely redesigned and extended version of its revolutionary CPR/AED “citizen responder” mobile phone application. The PulsePoint app enables members of the public to provide immediate life-saving assistance to victims of sudden cardiac arrest while professional responders are making their way to the scene.

“After calling 911, getting CPR started and applying an AED are the critical first steps in Sudden Cardiac Arrest survival,” said Richard Price, President of the PulsePoint Foundation. “In most cases no one is in a better position to positively affect the outcome of a cardiac arrest than nearby CPR/AED trained citizens.” The PulsePoint app has been activated on 1,500 actual cardiac emergencies informing nearly 6,000 nearby citizen rescuers. More than 350 communities across 14 states have enabled citizen response through PulsePoint with most computer-aided dispatch systems now supported. 75,000 people carry the PulsePoint app on their smartphone.

Sudden Cardiac Arrest is a leading cause of death in the United States, accounting for an estimated 325,000 deaths each year. “Today we are thrilled to announce the availability of the remarkable PulsePoint app to our 610,000 residents and several million annual visitors,” said William McDonald, Fire Chief for Las Vegas Fire & Rescue. “Empowering our citizens to help save lives in partnership with our organization is extremely satisfying.”

The highly anticipated release includes significant usability enhancements implemented within a beautiful new user interface. As with the previous release, the application was written by an all-volunteer engineering team from Workday, Inc. The announcement today is for the iOS version of the application. An update to the Android version will follow in the near future.

About the PulsePoint Foundation
PulsePoint is a 501(c)(3) non-profit foundation based in the San Francisco Bay Area committed to making it much easier for citizens who are trained in CPR to use their life saving skills to do just that… save lives! Through the use of modern, location-aware mobile devices PulsePoint is building applications that work with local public safety agencies to improve communications with citizens and empower them to help reduce the millions of annual deaths from sudden cardiac arrest. For more information visit PulsePoint.org

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August 29, 2013 | by

A Call for Local, Open Data

Open DataThis past May, President Obama issued an executive order requiring that going forward, any data generated by the federal government must be made available to the public in open, machine-readable formats. And last week, White House officials announced expanded technical guidance to help agencies make even more data accessible to the public.

The steps that the federal government has taken in opening up its data are a good start—but it’s only a start. As former Speaker Tip O’Neill famously said, “all politics is local.” In order for all citizens to truly benefit from open data, every city, county, and state needs to make their data more accessible. We’ve seen what happens when they do.

There have been a ton of incredible civic tools that have been made possible because of local open data efforts. Earlier this year, Contra Costa County in California launched the PulsePoint mobile application. The app notifies smartphone users who are trained in CPR when someone nearby may be in need of the lifesaving procedure.

Another great app out of Boston is the Adopt-a-Hydrant mobile application. The app maps out where fire hydrants are all throughout the city, so volunteers can help dig them out of the snow during the winter. This saves firefighters wasting valuable time hunting for these hydrants during fires. And what’s great about the app is it could work anywhere in the country, provided cities make their data accessible.

This past June, my company, Appallicious launched the Neighborhood Score app with San Francisco Mayor Ed Lee at the US Conference of Mayors (USCM) in Las Vegas. This one-of-a-kind app provides an overall health and sustainability score, block-by-block for every neighborhood in the city of San Francisco. Neighborhood Score uses local, state, and federal data sets to allow residents to see how their neighborhoods rank in everything from public safety, to quality of schools, crime rates, air quality, and much more.

We must go local with open data.

Read the full story by Yo Yoshida at Techwire.net

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August 14, 2013 | by

Saving lives through an app

ArvadaPressSmart phones these days can do much more than just making a call — and now that includes saving a life.

The Arvada Fire Protection District launched its own channel on the PulsePoint smart phone app on Aug. 5.

Once someone downloads the free app and sets Arvada Fire as their host location, the app alerts the user if a person in a nearby public place goes into cardiac arrest and needs hands-only CPR.

“All you need is CPR knowledge, you don’t have to be certified, just have knowledge of how to do chest compressions and it will notify you if CPR is needed in a public place within walking distance of where you are,” said Arvada Fire public information officer Scott Pribble.

Using GPS technology, the app notifies users about emergencies within about a 1,000 foot radius of where they are in a public place, such as a store, restaurant or park.

“I know it has saved lives,” Pribble said.

Read the full story by Sara Van Cleve at Our Colorado News.

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August 5, 2013 | by

PulsePoint app tells users someone nearby needs CPR

Fox31DenverARVADA, Colo. — The Arvada Fire Department is teaming up with a smart phone app developer in an effort to mix altruism with geo-location technology to save lives.
PulsePoint is a free app that can help someone who is having sudden cardiac arrest.

Users register through the app that they know CPR. The app will then notify the user if someone nearby is having cardiac arrest. It gives directions to the victim as well as show any nearby defibrillators.

The app is activated by 911 dispatchers and alerts go to anyone within walking distance of the victim, that is CPR trained and is willing to help.

The notifications are also only made if the victim is in a public place such as a mall or park, said Arvada fire spokesman Scott Pribble.

Read the full story by Thomas Hendrick at FOX31 Denver (KDVR).

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August 5, 2013 | by

New Arvada Fire Channel app launched by Arvada Fire could save a life

ARVADA – Arvada Fire launched the PulsePoint application on the Arvada Fire Channel, which could potentially help save lives.

Click here if video not displaying properly.

The free application notifies registered users of a cardiac arrest that has occurred in a public place nearby. PulsePoint puts out a map giving directions to the person, the location of the AEDs in the area, and in the future, it will also provide the radio traffic of the emergency responders.

To sign up for this application, a person has to be willing to do “hands-only” CPR, and the Good Samaritan Law covers anyone who is willing to help.

For iPhone users, PulsePoint can be searched and directly downloaded from the App Store. Android users can find the app under the same name on Google Play.

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August 5, 2013 | by

Turn Your Smart Phone into a Life Saver

Arvada FPD LogoARVADA – Your smart phone can do so many things from keeping your life on schedule, to checking your social media status and even playing games. Now your phone can help you save a life.

On Monday, August 5th, Arvada Fire will launch the Arvada Fire channel on the smart phone application, PulsePoint. The free PulsePoint app, which is available in your phone’s app store, will notify registered users of a cardiac arrest that has occurred in a public place that is in their vicinity. The app will give the citizen responder mapping directions, it will notify them of any automatic external defibrillators (AEDs) that are in the area and will, in the near future, even provide the radio traffic of the emergency responders.
When a person goes into sudden cardiac arrest, their heart, lungs and brain no longer receive the oxygen that they need to survive. For every minute that they do not receive chest compressions, their chance of survival decreases by 10%. Quick math would tell you that they would have zero chance of survival after just 10 minutes. That is why it is so important to get this process started before emergency responders arrive on the scene.

So, you want to help but mouth-to-mouth grosses you out? No problem. To sign up for this app, you only need to be willing to do “Hands-Only” CPR. According to the American Heart Association, Hands-Only CPR has been shown to be as effective as conventional CPR in the first few minutes of an out-of-hospital sudden cardiac arrest. Have you been trained in CPR but your card has expired? No problem. You do not need to be CPR certified to participate in this program. The Good Samaritan Law covers anyone who is willing to help as long as they do not attempt to do more than they are trained to do.

We are available to do interviews for the morning shows if you are interested. Shots could include an interview about how the app works and a brief lesson on “Hands-Only” CPR.

ABOUT PULSEPOINT
PulsePoint is a 501(c)(3) non-profit foundation based in the San Francisco Bay Area. Their mission is to make it much easier for citizens who are trained in CPR to use their life saving skills to do just that…save lives! Through the use of modern, location-aware mobile devices PulsePoint is building applications that work with local public safety agencies to improve communications with citizens and empower them to help reduce the millions of annual deaths from sudden cardiac arrest.

See more at: www.pulsepoint.org

Contact
Scott Pribble, Public Information Officer
Deanna Harrington, Public Information Officer
303-425-9203

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June 29, 2013 | by

PulsePoint Responder – In Her Own Words

On March 27th 2013, the PulsePoint mobile app deployed in Tualatin Valley Fire and Rescue notified three nearby citizen responders that someone close to their location was in need of CPR. Heather Roms, who is an RN for Legacy Emanuel Medical Center in Portland, was just leaving a nearby business when she received the PulsePoint notification on her smartphone. Heather responded and began CPR until EMS crews arrived. Heather stated that she heard about the app from her mother who works at a nearby middle school and was happy to be available to respond and help. Watch her story below.

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