October 16, 2015 | by

New CPR Guidelines Recommend Using Social Media and Mobile Technology to Speed Bystander CPR in Sudden Cardiac Arrests

PulsePoint CPR Response App Already Downloaded More than 505,000 Times – More than 16,500 Cardiac Arrest Responders Alerted to Date

(16 October 2015 – Redmond, WA) – For the first time, CPR guidelines issued by the American Heart Association (AHA) recommend that communities consider using social media and mobile app technology to alert CPR responders when someone nearby suffers sudden cardiac arrest. The new guidelines cite studies that show emerging mobile technologies can result in a “higher rate of bystander-initiated CPR.”

The leading bystander response mobile application, PulsePoint Respond, alerts users when a sudden cardiac arrest occurs in a nearby public place, directs them to the patient location and provides CPR guidance while paramedic units are en route to the call. The app also notifies users of the closest available Automated External Defibrillator (AED).

To date, the PulsePoint app has been downloaded more than 505,000 times and has alerted more than 16,500 responders to the need for CPR in more than 6,500 suspected sudden cardiac arrest incidents. PulsePoint is now active in more than 1,200 communities in 24 U.S. states and Canadian provinces.

The PulsePoint app has played a key role in saving several lives. The first documented PulsePoint save involved a 57-year old truck driver near Portland, Oregon, who suffered sudden cardiac arrest outside his gym and received CPR from a PulsePoint responder. In Spokane, Washington a five-week old infant received CPR from a nearby off-duty EMS volunteer working at his job as a mechanic. In Sunnyvale, California, a 63-year old father of two collapsed on a soccer field and received CPR from a college student living nearby who received a PulsePoint alert on his mobile phone.

“PulsePoint-connected communities don’t need to rely on the luck of having a CPR-trained citizen witness a cardiac arrest,” said Richard Price, President of the PulsePoint Foundation. “By directly notifying those who are qualified and nearby, PulsePoint helps put the right people in the right place at the right time. PulsePoint builds on the good work that a community has done with CPR training and AED placement and improves the efficiency and use of these resources. Two-thirds of our 24-hour healthcare professionals – firefighters, paramedics, police officers, nurses, doctors – are off-duty at any one time. With PulsePoint, responders like these are available to assist if they are made aware of an urgent need nearby.”

The PulsePoint apps were created by and are a product of the PulsePoint Foundation. Physio-Control is the foundation’s implementation partner and provides services to integrate PulsePoint with public safety agency dispatch and communication systems.

“Apps like PulsePoint can help save lives,” said Brian Webster, President and CEO of Physio-Control. “This new AHA guidance is a strong call to action. Quick bystander response to sudden cardiac arrests – performing early CPR and finding and using an AED – is a vital part of an effective system of care. Mobile devices are already in millions of hands – PulsePoint Respond puts lifesaving skills and awareness into those hands.”

“The PulsePoint mobile device system, for the first time, changes the old paradigm of waiting for trained EMS responders to arrive on scene,” said Dr. Bentley Bobrow, Medical Director, Bureau of Emergency Medicine and Trauma Services, Arizona Department of Health and past Chair of the American Heart Association Basic Life Support Subcommittee. “PulsePoint allows communities to harness the enormous life-saving potential of their citizens, many of whom are ready and willing to perform CPR and use an AED in the most critical minutes before trained EMS providers can arrive.”

Information on how to download the free PulsePoint app is available at this site. Public safety agencies interested in becoming PulsePoint-connected can learn more here.

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About Sudden Cardiac Arrest (SCA)
Sudden Cardiac Arrest is the abrupt loss of heart function in a person who may or may not have diagnosed heart disease. Death can occur shortly after symptoms appear without rapid intervention and treatment. Each year, more than 420,000 emergency medical services-assessed cardiac arrests occur in the United States. The American Heart Association states that “there is clear and consistent evidence of improved survival from sudden cardiac arrest when a bystander performs CPR and rapidly uses an AED.”

About the PulsePoint Foundation
PulsePoint is a 501(c)(3) non-profit foundation based in the San Francisco Bay Area. Through the use of location-aware mobile devices PulsePoint is building applications that work with local public safety agencies to improve communications with citizens, empowering them to help reduce the millions of annual deaths from sudden cardiac arrest (SCA). Deployment of the PulsePoint app can significantly strengthen the “chain of survival” by improving bystander response to cardiac arrest victims and increasing the chance that lifesaving steps will be taken prior to the arrival of emergency medical services (EMS). PulsePoint is supported by the Wireless Foundation, built and maintained by volunteer engineers at Workday and distributed by our marketing and implementation partner Physio-Control, Inc. Learn more at www.pulsepoint.org or join the conversation at Facebook and Twitter. The free app is available for download on iTunes and Google Play.

About Physio-Control
Physio-Control, Inc. is headquartered in Redmond, Washington. The company was founded in 1955 and is the world’s leading provider of professional emergency medical response solutions that predict or intervene in life-threatening emergencies. The company’s products include LIFEPAK® monitor/defibrillators and automated external defibrillators, the LIFENET® System, HealthEMS® electronic patient care reporting (ePCR) software, LUCAS® 2 Chest Compression System, TrueCPRTM coaching device, McGrath® MAC EMS video laryngoscope and implementation for PulsePoint mobile bystander response applications. Learn more at www.physio-control.com, or connect on Facebook, LinkedIn or Twitter.

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Matt Fikse, Physio-Control, +1 425-867-4208, matt.fikse@physio-control.com
Shannon Smith, PulsePoint Foundation, +1 773-339-7513, ssmith@smithmediarelations.com

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August 26, 2015 | by

Mobile Devices Alerting CPR-trained Bystanders of Nearby Victims

The use of mobile phone technology to alert bystanders trained in CPR is helping cardiac arrest victims receive prompt and critical care

Bystander CPRCardiac arrest is a severe health issue that poses a threat of brain damage and death. The American Heart Association reports that more than 420,000 emergency medical services-assessed out-of-hospital cardiac arrests occur annually.

With the significant benefits of early CPR and intervention, it is imperative that cardiac arrest patients outside of a hospital receive immediate care. The use of mobile phone technology and new mobile apps currently being developed in the United States and abroad can aid cardiac arrest victims in receiving prompt care by alerting CPR-trained volunteers in the area that an emergency situation requires their attention.

Benefits of Early Intervention
According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), approximately 92% of people who have sudden cardiac arrest outside of a hospital setting will die. However, previous research does show that receiving rescue breaths and chest compression from a bystander while waiting for emergency care can improve the chances of survival, although only about 30% of cardiac arrest patients receive critical bystander CPR.

A New England Journal of Medicine study conducted by researchers from the Center for Resuscitation Science at Karolinska Institute, in collaboration with several other Swedish universities, analyzed over 30,000 cases of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest over a 30-year period in Sweden.2 The results of this study reveal that cardiopulmonary resuscitation performed before the arrival of the ambulance is associated with over a two-fold increase in the chance of survival.

In addition, one of the key findings in the book Strategies to Improve Cardiac Arrest Survival: A Time to Act is that the immediate, hands-on response of bystanders to cardiac arrest is critical to improve rates of effective resuscitation and, thereby, increase the likelihood of survival and positive neurologic outcomes for out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. The authors of the text also noted that many national and international registry studies indicate that bystander CPR can increase survival rates for out-of-hospital cardiac arrest between 50% and 500%.

Mobile Lifesavers
An additional study conducted by the same group of international researchers evaluated a pilot program in Stockholm County, Sweden, which provided text message alerts to CPR-trained volunteers when a reported cardiac arrest was occurring 500 meters or closer to them. The study included 10,000 civilian volunteers with the mobile app, known as SMS Lifesavers, who were alerted of the cardiac emergency. With the use of the app, there was a 30% increase in the number of patients who received cardiopulmonary resuscitation before the arrival of paramedics, the police, or rescue services, according to the Karolinska Institute. The authors of the study concluded, “A mobile-phone positioning system to dispatch lay volunteers who were trained in CPR was associated with significantly increased rates of bystander-initiated CPR among persons with out-of-hospital cardiac arrest.”

According to Jacob Hollenberg, MD, cardiologist and head of research at the Center for Resuscitation Science, the system now includes 14,000 volunteers. In addition, the researchers have recently launched a new and updated service based on GPS technology that not only dispatches volunteers for CPR but also to get the nearest available public automated external defibrillator (AED).

Hollenberg stated, “Both of these studies clearly show that cardiopulmonary resuscitation is an effective, life-saving treatment and that further encouragement must be given to respond swiftly on suspected cardiac arrest.”

In the US, several cities, including Los Angeles and San Diego, as well as Plano, Tex, have implemented similar systems to garner the aid of CPR-trained volunteers for cardiac arrest victims. One such development is the new PulsePoint app also designed to alert CPR-trained volunteers in the event of a nearby cardiac arrest. Users of the app who have indicated they are trained in CPR will be notified on their mobile phone if someone nearby is having a cardiac emergency and may require CPR. According to the PulsePoint website, the app is designed to empower CPR-trained citizens to help improve patient outcomes and save lives by reducing collapse-to-CPR and collapse-to-defibrillation times.

The mobile app PulsePoint has recruited hundreds of thousands of volunteers and connected itself to hundreds of emergency response systems. “PulsePoint engages citizens in the health of their community by empowering them to become a critical and effective part of the chain of survival. We know early intervention leads to better outcomes and PulsePoint aims to activate an army of citizen first responders,” said Richard Price, founder of PulsePoint. “The promise is to crowd-source good Samaritans.”

How to Save a Life
In the future, the use of mobile “alert” technology may be applicable to other areas of medicine and other types of emergency situations. According to Price, the use of these new mobile phone apps can possibly be used in “medical emergencies requiring rapid field intervention, such as severe allergic reactions requiring epinephrine (EpiPen) or opioid depression, including respiratory depression, [and for persons who] could benefit from overdose-reversing drugs like Naloxone (Narcan).”

For now, however, the growing use of mobile technology is helping provide swift, critical care to cardiac arrest victims and improving their chances of survival. Hollenberg said, “Out-of-hospital cardiac arrest is a major health problem. We need to find new ways of increasing rates of bystander CPR in order to really affect survival.” Hollenberg added, “I believe this new method is a way forward that will increase not only the proportion of patients receiving bystander CPR but also early increase early defibrillation and survival.”

Source: RT Magazine article by Cassandra Perez

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June 14, 2015 | by

Crowdsourcing CPR gets more help to cardiac arrest victims

If you go into cardiac arrest, getting help within the first few minutes can mean the difference between life and death. A new study shows that help can get to victims more quickly with a mobile-phone app that directs people who know CPR to medical emergencies near them.

The researchers call their app a “mobile-phone positioning system,” an homage to the network of satellites that make up the global positioning system, or GPS. The app uses the GPS function in mobile phones to find and contact bystanders trained in cardiopulmonary resuscitation who happen to be in the vicinity of a reported cardiac emergency. CPR-trained volunteers download the app if they are willing to get the alerts.

Dr. Leif Svensson, a cardiologist at the Center for Resuscitation Science at Karolinska Institutet in Stockholm, conceived of the research project 10 years ago during his morning commute. A 50-year-old woman’s heart stopped right outside the bus he was on.

“Nobody on the bus, including myself, saw this,” he said.

But when he arrived at the hospital for work, he saw the woman again, dead upon arrival in the emergency room.

“I was sitting approximately 10 to 15 feet from the place where she had her cardiac arrest,” Svensson recalled. If he had known of her condition earlier, he would have been able to help by performing CPR.

So Svensson recruited some colleagues and devised a system to “find your closest lifesaver,” as he put it. Whenever someone reported a case of cardiac arrest to emergency responders, all CPR-trained volunteers who were within about a third of a mile of the patient would receive a text message and a phone call to alert them to the emergency and the patient’s location.

To test how well it worked, Svensson and his team enlisted nearly 10,000 CPR-trained volunteers to participate in the study. The team activated the network and put out a call to volunteers after 306 cardiac arrests over a 20-month period. In those cases, a volunteer was able to initiate CPR 62% of the time.

View the full story by Sasha Harris-Lovett at the Los Angeles Times.

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WKYC (NBC)

August 20, 2014 | by

Court bailiff saves a life with CPR

CLEVELAND — Donald Austin of Cleveland owes his life to strangers. Strangers who had a basic skill that was needed at a critical time. On July 29th, Austin took a friend to traffic court. While waiting on his friend, Austin collapsed from a massive heart attack.

Deputy Bailiff Stephen Gaines was just feet away when it happened and jumped into action.

Watch news video

“It surprised me that the training I had just snapped back into me with CPR,” Gaines says. The officer adds he had help from several colleagues including a Cleveland Police officer who assisted with the CPR, several other court officers and Sheriff’s Deputies. All who’ve had CPR training.

Meanwhile, Cleveland EMS and MetroHealth, where Austin was taken, say that the PulsePoint app was also activated. PulsePoint is a free app that you can download onto your phone and it will alert you if someone is having a heart attack nearby. It will also give you the closest AED location. No one knows who’s app was activated, but there was someone else willing to help Austin.

Austin can’t thank the officers enough.

“I have a second chance with my family and people that love me, I would like to thank them from the bottom of my heart for acting as fast as they did because they saved my life,” he says.

View the full story by Monica Robins at WKYC (NBC).

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August 6, 2014 | by

LA County Fire Dept. cardiac arrest app to ‘crowd-source good Samaritans’

Hoping to turn regular cellphone-toting Angelenos into rapid responders, the Los Angeles County Fire Department has linked its dispatch system to a cellphone app that will notify CPR-trained good Samaritans when someone in a public place nearby is having a cardiac arrest.

The app, called PulsePoint, sends Fire Department alerts out to mobile phone users at the same time that dispatchers send the official message out to emergency crews — increasing the possibility that a cardiac arrest victim can get life-saving CPR from a bystander while medical responders are still on the way, department officials said Wednesday.

The program also provides cardiopulmonary resuscitation instructions and the location of defibrillators nearby.

“Every person who knows CPR, downloads this app and activates it has their own fire department radio in their pocket,” said Fire Department medical director Dr. Franklin Pratt. “They become the first first responder.”

Enlisting nearby citizens who are prepared to deliver “hands-only CPR” — hard and fast compressions in the center of the chest — could greatly improve survival rates among cardiac arrest sufferers, Los Angeles County fire officials said.

Fire Chief Daryl L. Osby, who was on hand for a press event in Inglewood debuting the system, told The Times that the average emergency crew response time for his department was 5 minutes countywide, and sometimes longer in lower-density, far-flung communities such as Lancaster and Palmdale.

“If a citizen can begin CPR before the paramedics arrive, it increases survival,” he said.

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Medical director Pratt said that when the heart stops beating, the opportunity for survival with a good quality of life diminishes after about 3 or 4 minutes because of injury to the brain and changes in the body that make the heart less responsive. But in the first couple of minutes after cardiac arrest there’s still oxygen in the blood, he added. Immediate CPR can keep that oxygen flowing to the brain.

View the full story by Eryn Brown at the Los Angeles Times.

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August 6, 2014 | by

PulsePoint App Now Available to Los Angeles County

Mobile app empowers CPR-trained users and off-duty professionals to provide help immediately after cardiac arrest

Contact:
Captain Tom Richards
C: (213) 247-8524
O: (323) 881-2472

LOS ANGELES – August 6, 2014 – To aid cardiac arrest victims quickly, the Los Angeles County Fire Department, The PulsePoint Foundation and The Wireless Foundation are making the PulsePoint app available to individuals in the Los Angeles County area today. Aimed at average citizens and off-duty professionals trained in CPR, the app alerts registered users when a sudden cardiac arrest occurs in a public place in their immediate vicinity. Informed at the same time as emergency responders, users are given detailed instructions, including the location of automatic external defibrillators (AEDs) nearby.

More than 13,000 people in Los Angeles County have already downloaded the app, but local promotional campaigns are in development to help raise awareness among the County’s more than 4 million residents. The leading cause of death in the U.S., cardiac arrests outside hospitals are responsible for more than 1,000 deaths a day and 424,000 a year. Effective CPR administered immediately after a cardiac arrest can potentially double or triple the victim’s chance of survival, but less than half of victims receive that immediate help.

“Widespread deployment of the PulsePoint app can significantly strengthen the Chain of Survival by increasing the chance that lifesaving steps will be taken by CPR-trained individuals prior to the arrival of our personnel,” said Los Angeles County Fire Chief Daryl Osby. “Mobile technology can help us build a safer, more resilient community, and thanks to the donation by The Wireless Foundation, PulsePoint is available to Los Angeles County at no cost to our organization.”

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“This is a perfect example of the ‘connected life’ that provides enormous benefits for all thanks to this very simple concept, which is to alert CPR-trained individuals to a nearby cardiac arrest situation so they may assist until the professional responders arrive on the scene,” said Meredith Attwell Baker, President of The Wireless Foundation and President and CEO of CTIA-The Wireless Association. “If you’re CPR-trained, please download the PulsePoint app now to help save a life.”

In addition to the PulsePoint app, the Los Angeles County Fire Department will be launching PulsePoint AED app to help locate and record all public access defibrillators in the county for use during cardiac arrest emergencies. Once validated, these crowdsourced AED will be visible in the PulsePoint app as well as for dispatcher use during emergency calls. The PulsePoint apps are available for iPhone and Android and can be downloaded from the iTunes Store™ and Google Play™.

About the Los Angeles County Fire Department
Founded in 1923, the Los Angeles County Fire Department is an international leader of the fire service, and one of the largest emergency service agencies in the world. Each day, more than 900 emergency responders are on duty to provide fire protection, life safety and environmental protection services to more than four million residents and commercial businesses in Los Angeles County’s 2,296-square-mile area. When called into action following major international disasters, the Department’s Urban Search and Rescue Team responds around the globe as members of California Task Force 2. Once back in Los Angeles County, these same elite responders can be found at work in hometown neighborhoods in 58 cities and unincorporated areas. The Department proudly continues to be a frontrunner in firefighting technology, offering specialized training opportunities in Urban Search and Rescue, Emergency Medical Services, Hazardous Materials, Air Operations and Homeland Security. Behind the scenes, more than 800 dedicated business professionals help carry out the mission. Learn more at www.fire.lacounty.gov.

About the PulsePoint Foundation
PulsePoint is a 501(c)(3) non-profit foundation based in the San Francisco Bay Area. Its mission is to make it much easier for citizens who are trained in CPR to use their life-saving skills to do just that…save lives! Through the use of modern, location-aware mobile devices PulsePoint is building applications that work with local public safety agencies to improve communications with citizens and empower them to help reduce the millions of annual deaths from sudden cardiac arrest. Deployment of the PulsePoint app can significantly strengthen the “chain of survival” by improving bystander response to SCA victims in public settings and increasing the chance that lifesaving steps will be taken prior to the arrival of emergency medical services (EMS) professionals. PulsePoint is built and maintained by volunteer engineers at Workday and distributed by Physio-Control of Redmond, WA. The original idea came from Richard Price, the former chief of the San Ramon Valley Fire Department, who wanted to bridge the gap between the critical minutes following SCA and the 13 million Americans who are CPR trained, but often don’t know their skills are required. Learn more at www.pulsepoint.org or join the conversation at www.facebook.com/PulsePoint and @PulsePoint.

About The Wireless Foundation
The Wireless Foundation is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit dedicated to developing and supporting initiatives that use wireless technology to help American communities. The Foundation’s innovative programs benefit consumers in areas such as education, healthcare, safety and the environment. The Foundation was formed by CTIA-The Wireless Association® member companies in 1991. Learn more at www.wirelessfoundation.org.

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August 5, 2014 | by

Los Angeles County Launches Pulsepoint CPR “Citizen Responder” Mobile App

Press Conference August 6, 2014, 10 A.M.

Home Depot, 3363 W. Century Boulevard, Inglewood

 

Contact: Contact: Contact:
Fire Inspector Rick Flores Amy Storey Shannon Smith
Los Angeles County Fire Department The Wireless Foundation PulsePoint Foundation
213-200-1829 202-736-3207 616-724-4256
rflores@fire.lacounty.gov astorey@ctia.org ssmith@smithmediarelations.com

 

WHAT: Los Angeles County is launching PulsePoint, a free mobile app that alerts registered users whenever a cardiac arrest occurs in a public place in their immediate vicinity. Informed at the same time as emergency responders, bystanders are given detailed instructions, including the location of the nearest automatic external defibrillator (AED), and can begin hands-only CPR until responders arrive. County officials will join PulsePoint Founder Richard Price and The Wireless Foundation to talk about how this mobile technology will aid cardiac arrest victims quickly and will improve survivability in Los Angeles County.

PulsePoint Demonstration: Following all remarks, a live narrated demonstration of how the PulsePoint app works will take place. A “victim” will experience a sudden cardiac arrest in the parking lot adjacent to the press conference podium. A “Good Samaritan” trained in CPR will receive a phone alert while inside the Home Depot and will run out to provide chest compressions while responders are dispatched. Los Angeles County Fire Station 173 personnel will arrive to simulate patient care and transport.

WHEN: Wednesday, August 6, 2014, 10 A.M

WHO:

  • Los Angeles County Second District Supervisor Mark Ridley-Thomas
  • Los Angeles County Fire Chief Daryl L. Osby
  • Dr. Franklin Pratt, Medical Director, Los Angeles County Fire Department
  • Athena Polydorou, Executive Director, The Wireless Foundation
  • Richard Price, Founder and President of the PulsePoint Foundation
  • Danny Gutierrez and Roslyn De La Torre, Bystander CPR Good Samaritans
  • Sudden Cardiac Arrest Victim Elbert Kirby, along with his wife Wanda Kirby

*Note: Fire Inspector Rick Flores will be available for Spanish language interviews.
A sign language interpreter will also be present.

WHERE: Home Depot Store, 3363 W. Century Boulevard, Inglewood

WHY: Survivability rates for sudden cardiac arrest are less than 8% nationwide and approximately 6% in Los Angeles County. Every two minutes, someone dies from sudden cardiac arrest. Survivability depends greatly on receiving immediate CPR. PulsePoint will provide immediate notification to those nearby who can provide chest compressions to double or triple a victim’s chance of survival. Learn CPR. Get the App. Save a Life.

VISUALS:

  • 40-foot PulsePoint promotional banner draped between two Los Angeles County Fire Department ladder trucks behind speaker area
  • A live, narrated demonstration of how PulsePoint works
  • Hands-Only CPR training booth featuring customized LACoFD CPR training kits
  • A Public Service Announcement video will be provided at the event (thumb drive)

Check-In, Refreshments:
A media check-in table will be provided.
Refreshments provided by Company 77 Pizza, courtesy of The Wireless Foundation.

We Thank Our Partners:
Special thanks to The Wireless Foundation, the PulsePoint Foundation, and Physio-Control for their generous partnership in launching this lifesaving app in Los Angeles County.

Press Conference Host:
Battalion Chief Anderson Mackey, LACoFD Public Affairs

Learn CPR.  Get the App.  Save a Life.

#PulsePointLA

Web: Social Media:
www.fire.lacounty.gov www.facebook.com/LACoFD
www.pulsepoint.org www.twitter.com/LAC0_FD
www.wirelessfoundation.org www.youtube.com/user/LosAngelesCountyFD
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July 23, 2014 | by

Be More Than a Bystander

With the help of an awesome app, this firefighter saved a stranger’s life—and you could do the same

every-day-heroes-article-Brawner-400pxJust past 7:15 a.m. on May 9, off-duty firefighter Scott Brawner was working out to Pandora on the treadmill at his local 24-Hour Fitness in Clackamas, Oregon, when he received a series of alerts, overriding the music, on his iPhone.

The notification came from PulsePoint, a new 911-connected mobile app designed to let him, and up to 10 other CPR-trained citizens in the area, know that someone nearby was suffering Sudden Cardiac Arrest (SCA) and needed assistance ASAP. A map suddenly popped up on his screen, and within less than a minute, he found the unconscious man, 57-year-old Drew Basse, in the gym parking lot.

“As soon as I got outside, I noticed a security guard looking upset. I ran over to him, and that’s where I found Mr. Basse, sitting in his car with the door wide open. He had no pulse and he was not breathing,” says Brawner, 53, a veteran firefighter and paramedic with Tualatin Valley Fire & Rescue, Oregon’s second-largest fire department.

“It looked like it had just happened; he still had some bubbly spit around his mouth. So I grabbed him by his arms and pulled him out of his car,” says Brawner, who notes it wasn’t easy to move the approximately 265-pound Basse. He immediately started chest compressions at a rate of over 100 per minute while waiting for the ambulance, which the security guard had called earlier and is the reason Brawner had received the smartphone alert.

When paramedics arrived within 5 minutes, they were able to quickly get Basse breathing with a pulse again. But they were only successful at reviving Basse because of Brawner’s life-saving efforts.

Four days later, Brawner visited the hospital to check in on Basse and meet his family. “I’ve had a lot of people live throughout my career, but I’ve never had that one-on-one connection with somebody. I’m really happy how well that app worked. It allowed me to find him so fast,” says Brawner, who represents the first big success story for this new technology that was the brainchild of Richard Price, the former chief of California’s San Ramon Valley Fire Department, who wanted to connect the 13 million Americans who are CPR-trained with people who need their immediate help.

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“It’s pretty remarkable,” says Brawner, still in awe. “If I had taken a minute longer to get to him, he would have not survived.” Basse now has an implantable defibrillator in his chest and is expected to have a full recovery. He returned home from the rehab facility last week and will eventually go back to work as a truck driver. And Brawner and Basse have plans to go golfing this month.

View the full story by Chistina Goyanes at Men’s Health.

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