September 9, 2013 | by

PulsePoint Foundation Announces Significant Usability Enhancements in Latest Release

New app version includes most requested features within a completely redesigned user interface

PulsePoint App LVFRLAS VEGAS (September 9, 2013) – At EMS World today the PulsePoint Foundation debuted a completely redesigned and extended version of its revolutionary CPR/AED “citizen responder” mobile phone application. The PulsePoint app enables members of the public to provide immediate life-saving assistance to victims of sudden cardiac arrest while professional responders are making their way to the scene.

“After calling 911, getting CPR started and applying an AED are the critical first steps in Sudden Cardiac Arrest survival,” said Richard Price, President of the PulsePoint Foundation. “In most cases no one is in a better position to positively affect the outcome of a cardiac arrest than nearby CPR/AED trained citizens.” The PulsePoint app has been activated on 1,500 actual cardiac emergencies informing nearly 6,000 nearby citizen rescuers. More than 350 communities across 14 states have enabled citizen response through PulsePoint with most computer-aided dispatch systems now supported. 75,000 people carry the PulsePoint app on their smartphone.

Sudden Cardiac Arrest is a leading cause of death in the United States, accounting for an estimated 325,000 deaths each year. “Today we are thrilled to announce the availability of the remarkable PulsePoint app to our 610,000 residents and several million annual visitors,” said William McDonald, Fire Chief for Las Vegas Fire & Rescue. “Empowering our citizens to help save lives in partnership with our organization is extremely satisfying.”

The highly anticipated release includes significant usability enhancements implemented within a beautiful new user interface. As with the previous release, the application was written by an all-volunteer engineering team from Workday, Inc. The announcement today is for the iOS version of the application. An update to the Android version will follow in the near future.

About the PulsePoint Foundation
PulsePoint is a 501(c)(3) non-profit foundation based in the San Francisco Bay Area committed to making it much easier for citizens who are trained in CPR to use their life saving skills to do just that… save lives! Through the use of modern, location-aware mobile devices PulsePoint is building applications that work with local public safety agencies to improve communications with citizens and empower them to help reduce the millions of annual deaths from sudden cardiac arrest. For more information visit PulsePoint.org

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August 29, 2013 | by

A Call for Local, Open Data

Open DataThis past May, President Obama issued an executive order requiring that going forward, any data generated by the federal government must be made available to the public in open, machine-readable formats. And last week, White House officials announced expanded technical guidance to help agencies make even more data accessible to the public.

The steps that the federal government has taken in opening up its data are a good start—but it’s only a start. As former Speaker Tip O’Neill famously said, “all politics is local.” In order for all citizens to truly benefit from open data, every city, county, and state needs to make their data more accessible. We’ve seen what happens when they do.

There have been a ton of incredible civic tools that have been made possible because of local open data efforts. Earlier this year, Contra Costa County in California launched the PulsePoint mobile application. The app notifies smartphone users who are trained in CPR when someone nearby may be in need of the lifesaving procedure.

Another great app out of Boston is the Adopt-a-Hydrant mobile application. The app maps out where fire hydrants are all throughout the city, so volunteers can help dig them out of the snow during the winter. This saves firefighters wasting valuable time hunting for these hydrants during fires. And what’s great about the app is it could work anywhere in the country, provided cities make their data accessible.

This past June, my company, Appallicious launched the Neighborhood Score app with San Francisco Mayor Ed Lee at the US Conference of Mayors (USCM) in Las Vegas. This one-of-a-kind app provides an overall health and sustainability score, block-by-block for every neighborhood in the city of San Francisco. Neighborhood Score uses local, state, and federal data sets to allow residents to see how their neighborhoods rank in everything from public safety, to quality of schools, crime rates, air quality, and much more.

We must go local with open data.

Read the full story by Yo Yoshida at Techwire.net

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