September 19, 2013 | by

American Heart Association and Las Vegas FD Teach CPR and PulsePoint to 1,000 at Community Event

LAS VEGAS (KSNV & MyNews3) — Some local experts are teaching people how to save lives Wednesday.

News 3’s Denise Rosch was downtown as tourists and locals were pulled off the street for a mass CPR training session.

This is the American Heart Association’s hands only CPR training.


Click here if video not displaying properly.

A free, 15-minute session designed to teach as many people as possible the simple technique of proper chest compressions.

Melanie Baldwin is living proof, it works. In June her husband performed CPR on her when she collapsed, in full cardiac arrest. Now she’s helping spread the word that the life you save could be someone you love.

“My husband was my traumatized than I was, because you want to be able to help, you don’t want to feel helpless,” Baldwin said.

According to the American Heart Association, 90 percent of sudden cardiac arrest victims die before reaching the hospital.

But immediate CPR can double or even triple a victim’s chance of survival. Exactly what this event is all about.

The goal was to teach 1,000 people this simple procedure in the next five days and ask them, to turn around and teach someone else.

There is also an app for this.

“Your phone will send you an alert you’re within 200 yards of where somebody needs CPR,” said Chief Wille McDonald of Las Vegas Fire.

It’s called Pulse point and is free through iTunes. Las Vegas Fire Chief Willie McDonald says you can monitor fire calls right from your smartphone.

Full Story

September 9, 2013 | by

PulsePoint Foundation Announces Significant Usability Enhancements in Latest Release

New app version includes most requested features within a completely redesigned user interface

PulsePoint App LVFRLAS VEGAS (September 9, 2013) – At EMS World today the PulsePoint Foundation debuted a completely redesigned and extended version of its revolutionary CPR/AED “citizen responder” mobile phone application. The PulsePoint app enables members of the public to provide immediate life-saving assistance to victims of sudden cardiac arrest while professional responders are making their way to the scene.

“After calling 911, getting CPR started and applying an AED are the critical first steps in Sudden Cardiac Arrest survival,” said Richard Price, President of the PulsePoint Foundation. “In most cases no one is in a better position to positively affect the outcome of a cardiac arrest than nearby CPR/AED trained citizens.” The PulsePoint app has been activated on 1,500 actual cardiac emergencies informing nearly 6,000 nearby citizen rescuers. More than 350 communities across 14 states have enabled citizen response through PulsePoint with most computer-aided dispatch systems now supported. 75,000 people carry the PulsePoint app on their smartphone.

Sudden Cardiac Arrest is a leading cause of death in the United States, accounting for an estimated 325,000 deaths each year. “Today we are thrilled to announce the availability of the remarkable PulsePoint app to our 610,000 residents and several million annual visitors,” said William McDonald, Fire Chief for Las Vegas Fire & Rescue. “Empowering our citizens to help save lives in partnership with our organization is extremely satisfying.”

The highly anticipated release includes significant usability enhancements implemented within a beautiful new user interface. As with the previous release, the application was written by an all-volunteer engineering team from Workday, Inc. The announcement today is for the iOS version of the application. An update to the Android version will follow in the near future.

About the PulsePoint Foundation
PulsePoint is a 501(c)(3) non-profit foundation based in the San Francisco Bay Area committed to making it much easier for citizens who are trained in CPR to use their life saving skills to do just that… save lives! Through the use of modern, location-aware mobile devices PulsePoint is building applications that work with local public safety agencies to improve communications with citizens and empower them to help reduce the millions of annual deaths from sudden cardiac arrest. For more information visit PulsePoint.org

Full Story