March 25, 2013 | by

You Can Become A (Life-Saving) Neighborhood Superhero

Cardiac Arrest Patient1,000 sudden cardiac deaths a day–and many preventable!

1,000 Americans die every day from sudden cardiac arrest, making it a leading cause of death in the US. But many of these deaths would be prevented if CPR was initiated, and an AED was deployed, in the first few minutes after a cardiac arrest. Over the past 50 years, 300 million people have been trained in CPR, yet today, CPR is only performed in about 25% of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest cases. Think about that–only 1 out of 4 times is CPR underway when paramedics arrive. And even worse, publicly available automated external defibrillators (AED’s), the ones you see in airports, schools and other places of assembly, like hotels, are retrieved and used only 1% or 2% of the time when available– primarily because lay rescuers don’t think about them, and don’t know where to find them. Without intervention, a cardiac arrest victim has only about 10 minutes to live. But CPR suspends time, essentially stopping that 10-minute clock, and sustains life until more advanced care can arrive. So after 10 minutes you have no chance of survival; and brain damage begins several minutes before that. Even some of the best EMS systems in the country have a response time goal of 7 minutes. Not much room for error; this excruciatingly short window of opportunity is exactly why most people do not survive a sudden cardiac arrest. Today, more than ever, citizens helping citizens is the only way for the “chain of survival” to work. Local government response times are not improving in this economy – if anything they are getting worse. This simple fact should “shock” you into action: When CPR begins, and an AED is deployed, in the first few minutes after a cardiac arrest, survival rates can approach 80%.

Read the full article by John Nosta at Forbes.

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March 23, 2013 | by

STOP a heart. SAVE a life.

AEDBeyond the ability for technology to improve our lives, perhaps its most important contribution is to save these very lives. Technology has emerged to address the the most dangerous consequence of the world’s most common killer–heart disease. This is an important and critical public health issue. And I’m writing this as part scientist, part paramedic and part citizen. I have experienced the futility of a cardiac arrest in a setting where there were no trained professionals or technology at hand and also experienced the jubiliation of a life resuscitated by the aid of technology combined with knowledge.

A life-saving tool, often tragically unnoticed.
This is a call to arms for an inexpensive piece of high technology that stands ready to save lives–even your own. It’s called the Automated External Defibrillator (AED). It’s an amazing device and something that we all must know about. It’s akin to the significance of the Heimlich maneuver that also has saved many lives. Just as you see a fire extinguisher and instantly recognize its value, the AED should be “on your emergency radar” in a similar fashion. These devices are becoming common, yet their utility is sadly reserved for only a few who understand how to used them.

Read the full article by John Nosta at Forbes.

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February 6, 2011 | by

Chief Price appears on ‘Press: Here’

Chief Price on the NBC Sunday morning television show ‘Press: Here’

Chief Price on the NBC Sunday morning television show ‘Press: Here’

In follow-up of the successful launch of the District’s new iPhone application, Chief Price appeared on the Sunday morning television show ‘Press: Here’ to answer questions from host Scott McGrew, Kym McNicholas of Forbes and Ben Parr of Mashable. Dr. Amit Singhal of Google also appeared as a guest on the show this week.

Watch this episode of ‘Press: Here’ which aired on NBC at 9 a.m. on Sunday, February 6, 2011.

About the Show
‘Press: Here’ is a Sunday morning news roundtable discussion show featuring the top names in Silicon Valley’s technology industry and world class technology reporters from The New York Times, CNBC, Time Magazine, TechCrunch, USA Today, Businessweek, Forbes, The Financial Times, NPR, the BBC and Fortune.

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