October 16, 2015 | by

New CPR Guidelines Recommend Using Social Media and Mobile Technology to Speed Bystander CPR in Sudden Cardiac Arrests

PulsePoint CPR Response App Already Downloaded More than 505,000 Times – More than 16,500 Cardiac Arrest Responders Alerted to Date

(16 October 2015 – Redmond, WA) – For the first time, CPR guidelines issued by the American Heart Association (AHA) recommend that communities consider using social media and mobile app technology to alert CPR responders when someone nearby suffers sudden cardiac arrest. The new guidelines cite studies that show emerging mobile technologies can result in a “higher rate of bystander-initiated CPR.”

The leading bystander response mobile application, PulsePoint Respond, alerts users when a sudden cardiac arrest occurs in a nearby public place, directs them to the patient location and provides CPR guidance while paramedic units are en route to the call. The app also notifies users of the closest available Automated External Defibrillator (AED).

To date, the PulsePoint app has been downloaded more than 505,000 times and has alerted more than 16,500 responders to the need for CPR in more than 6,500 suspected sudden cardiac arrest incidents. PulsePoint is now active in more than 1,200 communities in 24 U.S. states and Canadian provinces.

The PulsePoint app has played a key role in saving several lives. The first documented PulsePoint save involved a 57-year old truck driver near Portland, Oregon, who suffered sudden cardiac arrest outside his gym and received CPR from a PulsePoint responder. In Spokane, Washington a five-week old infant received CPR from a nearby off-duty EMS volunteer working at his job as a mechanic. In Sunnyvale, California, a 63-year old father of two collapsed on a soccer field and received CPR from a college student living nearby who received a PulsePoint alert on his mobile phone.

“PulsePoint-connected communities don’t need to rely on the luck of having a CPR-trained citizen witness a cardiac arrest,” said Richard Price, President of the PulsePoint Foundation. “By directly notifying those who are qualified and nearby, PulsePoint helps put the right people in the right place at the right time. PulsePoint builds on the good work that a community has done with CPR training and AED placement and improves the efficiency and use of these resources. Two-thirds of our 24-hour healthcare professionals – firefighters, paramedics, police officers, nurses, doctors – are off-duty at any one time. With PulsePoint, responders like these are available to assist if they are made aware of an urgent need nearby.”

The PulsePoint apps were created by and are a product of the PulsePoint Foundation. Physio-Control is the foundation’s implementation partner and provides services to integrate PulsePoint with public safety agency dispatch and communication systems.

“Apps like PulsePoint can help save lives,” said Brian Webster, President and CEO of Physio-Control. “This new AHA guidance is a strong call to action. Quick bystander response to sudden cardiac arrests – performing early CPR and finding and using an AED – is a vital part of an effective system of care. Mobile devices are already in millions of hands – PulsePoint Respond puts lifesaving skills and awareness into those hands.”

“The PulsePoint mobile device system, for the first time, changes the old paradigm of waiting for trained EMS responders to arrive on scene,” said Dr. Bentley Bobrow, Medical Director, Bureau of Emergency Medicine and Trauma Services, Arizona Department of Health and past Chair of the American Heart Association Basic Life Support Subcommittee. “PulsePoint allows communities to harness the enormous life-saving potential of their citizens, many of whom are ready and willing to perform CPR and use an AED in the most critical minutes before trained EMS providers can arrive.”

Information on how to download the free PulsePoint app is available at this site. Public safety agencies interested in becoming PulsePoint-connected can learn more here.

###

About Sudden Cardiac Arrest (SCA)
Sudden Cardiac Arrest is the abrupt loss of heart function in a person who may or may not have diagnosed heart disease. Death can occur shortly after symptoms appear without rapid intervention and treatment. Each year, more than 420,000 emergency medical services-assessed cardiac arrests occur in the United States. The American Heart Association states that “there is clear and consistent evidence of improved survival from sudden cardiac arrest when a bystander performs CPR and rapidly uses an AED.”

About the PulsePoint Foundation
PulsePoint is a 501(c)(3) non-profit foundation based in the San Francisco Bay Area. Through the use of location-aware mobile devices PulsePoint is building applications that work with local public safety agencies to improve communications with citizens, empowering them to help reduce the millions of annual deaths from sudden cardiac arrest (SCA). Deployment of the PulsePoint app can significantly strengthen the “chain of survival” by improving bystander response to cardiac arrest victims and increasing the chance that lifesaving steps will be taken prior to the arrival of emergency medical services (EMS). PulsePoint is supported by the Wireless Foundation, built and maintained by volunteer engineers at Workday and distributed by our marketing and implementation partner Physio-Control, Inc. Learn more at www.pulsepoint.org or join the conversation at Facebook and Twitter. The free app is available for download on iTunes and Google Play.

About Physio-Control
Physio-Control, Inc. is headquartered in Redmond, Washington. The company was founded in 1955 and is the world’s leading provider of professional emergency medical response solutions that predict or intervene in life-threatening emergencies. The company’s products include LIFEPAK® monitor/defibrillators and automated external defibrillators, the LIFENET® System, HealthEMS® electronic patient care reporting (ePCR) software, LUCAS® 2 Chest Compression System, TrueCPRTM coaching device, McGrath® MAC EMS video laryngoscope and implementation for PulsePoint mobile bystander response applications. Learn more at www.physio-control.com, or connect on Facebook, LinkedIn or Twitter.

###

Matt Fikse, Physio-Control, +1 425-867-4208, matt.fikse@physio-control.com
Shannon Smith, PulsePoint Foundation, +1 773-339-7513, ssmith@smithmediarelations.com

Full Story
App Icons

September 6, 2014 | by

How do I help bring PulsePoint to my community?

PulsePoint is typically marketed to Fire and EMS agencies. If you are with a public safety agency we are well equipped to lead you through the process. We have partnered with Physio-Control to discuss and implement PulsePoint throughout the United States and around the world. You can reach out to your local rep or give Physio-Control a call at (800) 442-1142. You can also send them an inquiry at pulsepoint@physio-control.com.

With the amount national attention PulsePoint has received recently we are fielding many inquiries from individuals interested in having PulsePoint provided in their community. While it is the mission of our foundation to provide seamless PulsePoint coverage across the globe, this will obviously take time. PulsePoint must be integrated into the local emergency call center so that we can be aware of cardiac arrests in real time.

Although we are working hard to make public safety agencies aware of PulsePoint, you can definitely help by expressing interest to your local fire chief, EMS official, and elected officials such as your mayor and council members. A simple note, phone call or public meeting comment would ensure that they are aware of PulsePoint. Expressing your personal willingness to participate in improving local cardiac arrest survival rates through CPR and AED use would likely be well received and go a long way to help move things up in priority. We have found that City Hall does listen and is quite willing to bring PulsePoint to the community. Here is a brochure you can share with them.

We are adding PulsePoint-connected communities on an almost daily basis and look forward to adding your community in the very near future.

Full Story
Amy Schatz,

August 24, 2014 | by

Life Saving Crowdsourcing App Expands Reach To Stop Cardiac Arrests

Recode LogoOff-duty firefighter Scott Brawner was working out in a suburban Portland gym this spring, listening to Pandora, when suddenly the music stopped.

An app on his phone warned him that someone nearby needed CPR. Brawner reportedly raced around the gym, trying to find the victim before heading to the parking lot, where he saw a man sprawled on the pavement. He began giving the man CPR until fire and rescue units showed up.

The man’s survival wasn’t just a blessing for his family, it was a huge victory for the PulsePoint Foundation, a Bay Area non-profit whose app is making it easier to alert CPR-trained people that someone nearby needs help.

Crowdsourcing has been used for everything from political campaigns to potato salad, but PulsePoint’s app represents the first time it has been used on a wide-scale to help save dying people in cardiac arrest. Victims have very little time – generally ten minutes or under – to receive CPR before they either lose brain functions or die.

PulsePoint’s free app connects to local 911 call centers and alerts users when there is someone nearby in need of CPR. PulsePoint users get an alert the same time as local emergency responders.

It also shows the location of the closest automatic defibrillator (if there is one nearby) as well as a reminder about how to do CPR, just in case the user has an adrenaline-induced brain-freeze. A related PulsePoint app is trying to get people to crowdsource the locations of automatic defibrillators so volunteers will know where to find them.

“As a fire chief I was always focused on response times. Trying to get help to people faster,” said Richard Price, a former San Ramon Valley Fire Department chief, who is the force behind the app and the non-profit foundation that oversees it. Crowdsourcing volunteer CPR-trained volunteers “is a very efficient, low-cost way of making an impact.”

Price came up with the idea for the app five years ago after a disturbing incident one day while eating a sandwich.

He was at a local deli when he heard sirens, Price remembers. Emergency vehicles pulled up and he rushed outside to see what was going on. A man in a shop next door had collapsed and emergency responders were unable to revive him.

“He was on the other side of the wall, I couldn’t see him,” Price says. “He lay there unconscious with no one doing CPR. I had a (automated defibrillator) nearby in my vehicle.”

Although the iPhone had been introduced a few years before, apps that took advantage of location-based information were only starting to be developed.

“It just struck me that we could have off-duty professionals – police, firefighters, nurses and all the CPR trained citizens – who had to be in the exact right place at the right time,” he said. “We have these phones now. Could we use someone’s phone to determine their locations…give them the same capabilities as first responders?”

Price’s fire department had little money to spend on the project. He says he talked to developers around the Bay Area but couldn’t find anyone who would help them for the right price. He eventually connected with a computer science program at Northern Kentucky University, which required students to develop a working app as a graduation requirement.

A group of students created a working prototype “at almost no cost,” Price says. They tested the app in the San Ramon area and eventually found support from PeopleSoft co-founder David Duffield, whose enterprise cloud applications company WorkDay, volunteered to take over. The company still volunteers engineering time to develop and maintain the technology.

The PulsePoint Foundation was created in 2011, which holds all of the intellectual property for the app, as well as funding from WorkDay and other groups to help expand the app’s reach. The foundation also partnered with Physio-Control, a medical device developer specializing in automated defibrillators, to market the app technology.

Los Angeles County began using the system earlier this month, joining about 700 local communities in 20 states which have connected the technology to their 911 call centers. Another 200 communities are in the process of adding the service, Price says, which generally costs about $5,000 a year.

View the full story by Amy Schatz at Re/code.

Full Story
San Diego Logo Trio

July 28, 2014 | by

San Diego County, City, Fire Partners Activate Life-saving CPR App

Technology Helps Citizens Become Heroes

NEWS RELEASE
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
July 28, 2014
Contacts: County: Michele Clock 619-531-4506
City: Lee Swanson 619-533-3780

Every minute a victim of sudden cardiac arrest waits for CPR, their chance of survival drops by up to 10 percent.

After four to six minutes, brain damage begins to occur.

After 10 minutes, it’s often too late. Few resuscitation attempts succeed.

Now PulsePoint, an innovative new smartphone application, lets citizens trained in CPR know when their help is needed, allowing them to step in during those critical moments before a paramedic arrives. It is now available in the San Diego region, thanks to the County and a coalition of local agencies.

County Supervisors Ron Roberts and Bill Horn, San Diego Mayor Kevin L. Faulconer, San Diego County Fire Chiefs’ Association President Dave Hanneman and other local fire and government officials on Monday announced the arrival of the cutting-edge technology at a news conference at San Diego Fire-Rescue Department’s Fire Station 1.

“Sudden cardiac arrest is a leading cause of death in our country, and just 8 percent of those who experience it survive,” Supervisor Ron Roberts said. “We can do better. This app can help us change these grim statistics.”

Full Story

The region is one of the largest in the U.S. to launch the app, which was developed by the Pleasanton, California-based nonprofit PulsePoint Foundation and distributed by Redmond, Washington-based emergency medical device company Physio-Control, Inc. San Diego joins the more than 500 localities around the nation that have begun using the app. Also available on Monday is compression-only CPR training from local ambulance providers Rural/Metro and American Medical Response.

“San Diego is again on health care’s leading edge by adopting this technology,” said Mayor Kevin L. Faulconer. “It is going to allow us as citizens to help one another in previously unimaginable ways. But it’s up to us to get trained, download this tool and use it.”

Mayor Kevin Faulconer

“Most of us have a friend or loved one who has suffered with a heart condition,” said Supervisor Bill Horn. “Sudden cardiac arrest can happen to one of those individuals, or out of the blue to any of us, at any time. You never know who or when you may be in the right place at the right time to help someone, thanks to this app.”

When a 9-1-1 call for sudden cardiac arrest comes in, an alert goes to the app at the same time first responders are dispatched. Citizens who are signed up for the app and nearby the incident are notified of the location of the victim as well as the closest publicly accessible AEDs.

How effective the app is in a community depends on citizen involvement. Get trained in CPR and sign up to receive the alerts. The American Red Cross, American Heart Association, and San Diego Project Heartbeat provide trainings throughout the year. You never know, you may just help save someone’s life! So please download the app through Google play or the Apple App store. Also available through PulsePoint is a companion app called PulsePoint AED, which allows the public to register the locations of publicly accessible AEDs in their community.

Cox Communications is supporting this program by airing this public service announcement (PSA) promoting the PulsePoint app on local cable channels. For more information, visit the County’s PulsePoint information page or to download the apps, visit PulsePoint.

Less Story
PulsePoint AED Logo

June 3, 2014 | by

PulsePoint Foundation and Physio-Control Launch App to Build Comprehensive Automated External Defibrillator (AED) Registry

PulsePoint AED Will Complement Lifesaving PulsePoint Respond App

(LAS VEGAS, Nevada) – June 3, 2014 – PulsePoint AED, a new mobile application designed to build a comprehensive registry of automated external defibrillators (AEDs) available for use during cardiac emergencies, was released today by the PulsePoint Foundation at the Emergency Cardiovascular Care Update (ECCU) 2014 Conference in Las Vegas, Nevada. The PulsePoint Foundation is a non-profit organization dedicated to providing mobile technologies to help everyday citizens save lives. Physio-Control, the leading provider of emergency medical response technologies worldwide, is the marketing and implementation partner of the Foundation.

When a cardiac emergency strikes, finding an automated external defibrillator (AED) can help save a life. But that takes knowing where AEDs are located. “The PulsePoint AED registry is one of the largest and fastest growing defibrillator databases in the world,” said Richard Price, president of the PulsePoint Foundation. “The new PulsePoint AED app strengthens the chain of survival for cardiac arrest victims by empowering CPR/AED-aware citizens to report up-to-date AED location information to local authorities and to make that information immediately available to dispatchers and trained bystanders nearby.”

Full Story

Once the location of AEDs enters the database via the PulsePoint AED app, all validated AED’s become visible in the PulsePoint Respond app, which means that AED information is provided to the local emergency communications center for instant display on dispatcher consoles during calls for assistance. This allows the dispatchers to direct callers to public AEDs near them during an emergency.

“PulsePoint AED is a great way for agencies to build comprehensive AED registries while involving local citizens. Users of PulsePoint and subscribing local emergency responders all get updated information about the AEDs in their communities,” said Cameron Pollock, Vice President of Marketing, Physio-Control, Inc. “With PulsePoint AED and PulsePoint Respond, citizens, responders and medical care providers can effectively work together in their communities to help save lives.”

“Keeping AED location information current is a significant challenge,” said Jeff Helm, Division Chief, Sioux Falls Fire Rescue in South Dakota. “PulsePoint AED will increase community awareness of AED locations and will simplify the task of discovering devices missing from our registry.” In 2012 Sioux Falls Fire Rescue received the Harvard University Kennedy School of Government Ash Institute’s Bright Ideas Award for their public access defibrillator (PAD) program.

“We are pleased to continue our partnership with the PulsePoint Foundation on another life-saving resource for our community,” said Tomi Ryba, president and chief executive officer of El Camino Hospital in California. “This week is National CPR and AED Awareness Week and the launch of the PulsePoint AED app is a great opportunity for our community to actively participate in identifying local AEDs and educating themselves about the life-saving potential of CPR and AEDs.”

PulsePoint AED is the second app created by the PulsePoint Foundation. PulsePoint Respond was launched in 2011 and empowers everyday citizens to provide lifesaving assistance to victims of sudden cardiac arrest. Last month in Portland, Oregon, off-duty firefighter Scott Brawner was working out at a local health club when he received an alert through PulsePoint Respond. Brawner responded and performed CPR until advanced care arrived. Alerts provided by the PulsePoint Respond app helped save the cardiac arrest victim’s life. The PulsePoint Respond app has been downloaded more than 200,000 times to date.

PulsePoint AED and PulsePoint Respond are available to the public free of charge for Apple iOS and Google Android devices from the Apple App Store and Google Play. Engineering for both applications is provided by volunteers at Workday, Inc. Public safety agencies interested in implementing PulsePoint may contact their local Physio-Control representative or call 800-442-1142.

About sudden cardiac arrest

SCA is a leading cause of death in the United States, accounting for an estimated 325,000 deaths each year/1,000 deaths per day. The American Heart Association estimates that effective bystander CPR, provided immediately after sudden cardiac arrest, can double or triple a person’s chance of survival. However, only about one quarter of SCA victims receive bystander CPR and even fewer receive a potentially lifesaving therapeutic shock from a public access AED. Improving bystander CPR rates and access to AEDs is critical to survival.

About Physio-Control

Physio-Control, Inc. is headquartered in Redmond, Washington. The company operates in over 100 countries and is the world’s leading provider of professional emergency medical response solutions that predict or intervene in life threatening emergencies. To learn more visit www.physio-control.com, or connect at www.facebook.com/physiocontrolinc, https://www.linkedin.com/company/physio-control-inc-or @PhysioControl

About the PulsePoint Foundation

PulsePoint is a 501(c)(3) non-profit foundation based in the San Francisco Bay Area. Its mission is to make it much easier for citizens who are trained in CPR to use their life saving skills to do just that…save lives! Through the use of modern, location-aware mobile devices PulsePoint is building applications that work with local public safety agencies to improve communications with citizens and empower them to help reduce the millions of annual deaths from sudden cardiac arrest. Learn more at www.pulsepoint.org or join the conversation at http://www.facebook.com/PulsePoint and @PulsePoint.

# # #

Media Contact:

Matt Fikse, Tel: 425-867-4208, Email: matt.fikse@physio-control.com

Less Story
Drew Basse and Scott Brawner

May 27, 2014 | by

PulsePoint App Saves Life of Cardiac Arrest Victim

Life-saving CPR performed after mobile app notifies nearby off-duty firefighter

CFD #1 LogoCLACKAMAS, Ore., May 28, 2014 – On Friday, May 9, 2014 off-duty firefighter Scott Brawner was working out at a local health club when he received an alert through PulsePoint, a 9-1-1 connected mobile app designed to alert CPR-trained citizens of Sudden Cardiac Arrest (SCA) emergencies in their proximity. This alert saved a man’s life.

Using the map presented by the PulsePoint app, Scott immediately made his way to the reported patient location. In less than a minute, Scott found the man unconscious in the parking lot outside of the health facility where a security guard had first found him unresponsive and called 9-1-1. Scott immediately assessed and began hands-only CPR. He continued providing chest compressions until paramedics from American Medical Response (AMR) and Clackamas Fire District #1 arrived to provide advanced care.

Full Story

“As a fire fighter I know that every minute that passes without a SCA victim receiving resuscitation, the chances of that person surviving decrease 10 percent.” said Scott Brawner, Firefighter/Paramedic with Tualatin Valley Fire & Rescue (TVF&R). “By adopting PulsePoint, agencies are removing much of the fate and luck in survival by involving CPR-trained citizen rescuers in cardiac arrest response.”

On Saturday, May 17, 2014, at Adventist Medical Center in Portland, Oregon, Scott had the opportunity to meet the man he had saved just a week prior. His name is Drew Basse, a 57-year-old truck driver from Milwaukie, Oregon. Scott also met Drew’s son Shane, 31, and daughter Staci, 27. It was an emotional meeting filled with gratitude and appreciation as Drew is expected to fully recover with no loss of cognitive function because CPR was administered so quickly. The family was especially interested in learning more about the “miracle app” they had heard played such a key role in Drew’s survival.

“This app saved my Dad’s life,” said Shane Basse, “We’re so grateful to the PulsePoint Foundation for creating this life-saving app, Scott Brawner for his heroic actions and Clackamas Fire for not only their quick response, but for adopting this technology.”

“The PulsePoint app did its job by alerting a Good Samaritan simultaneously with the dispatch of our crews, ” said Bill Conway, EMS Officer for Clackamas Fire District #1. “This incredibly positive outcome is why Clackamas Fire, like so many organizations throughout the U.S., invested in this type of technology.”

The app on Scott’s phone is from the non-profit PulsePoint Foundation. The app is designed to reduce collapse-to-CPR and collapse-to-defibrillation times by increasing citizen awareness of cardiac events beyond a traditional “witnessed” area and by displaying the precise location of nearby public access defibrillators (AEDs).

About the PulsePoint Foundation
PulsePoint is a 501(c)(3) non-profit foundation based in the San Francisco Bay Area. Its mission is to make it much easier for citizens who are trained in CPR to use their life-saving skills to do just that…save lives! Through the use of modern, location-aware mobile devices PulsePoint is building applications that work with local public safety agencies to improve communications with citizens and empower them to help reduce the millions of annual deaths from sudden cardiac arrest.

Deployment of the PulsePoint app can significantly strengthen the “chain of survival” by improving bystander response to SCA victims in public settings and increasing the chance that lifesaving steps will be taken prior to the arrival of emergency medical services (EMS) professionals. Just two years after launching outside the San Ramon Valley (CA) the PulsePoint app has been adopted in 600 cities and communities in 18 states.

PulsePoint is built and maintained by volunteer engineers at Workday, a Silicon Valley-based company that creates enterprise cloud applications, and distributed by Physio-Control. The original idea came from Richard Price, the former chief of the San Ramon Valley Fire Department who wanted to bridge the gap between the critical minutes following SCA and the 13 million Americans who are CPR trained, but often don’t know their skills are required.

The PulsePoint app is available for iPhone and Android and can be downloaded from the iTunes Store™ and Google Play™. Learn more at www.pulsepoint.org.

About Clackamas Fire District #1
Clackamas Fire District #1 provides fire, rescue, and emergency medical services to the cities of Milwaukie, Oregon City, Happy Valley, Johnson City and a portion of Damascus as well as the unincorporated areas of Oak Lodge, Clackamas, Westwood, Carver, Redland, Beavercreek, Carus, Clarkes, and South End/Central Point.

The District has 17 fire stations strategically located throughout Clackamas County with a workforce of more than 200 employees and 100 volunteers. It is the second largest fire protection district in Oregon serving over 179,000 citizens in an area covering nearly 200 square miles.

Clackamas Fire District #1 is a CFAI Accredited agency meeting the highest standards in emergency service delivery.

About TVF&R
Tualatin Valley Fire & Rescue provides fire protection and emergency medical services to approximately 454,000 citizens in one of the fastest growing regions in Oregon. The District’s 210 square mile service area includes the cities of Beaverton, Durham, King City, Rivergrove, Sherwood, Tigard, Tualatin, West Linn, and Wilsonville, and unincorporated portions of Clackamas, Multnomah, and Washington County. TVF&R is a CFAI Accredited agency.

About Cardiac Arrest
Out-of-hospital cardiac arrest is a leading cause of death in the United States, accounting for an estimated 424,000 deaths each year, more than 1,000 deaths per day. The American Heart Association estimates that effective bystander CPR, provided immediately after cardiac arrest, can double or triple a person’s chance of survival. However, less than half of cardiac arrest victims receive bystander CPR and even fewer receive a potentially lifesaving therapeutic shock from a public access AED. Improving bystander CPR rates and access to AEDs is critical to survival.

Different than a heart attack, sudden cardiac arrest is caused when the heart’s electrical system malfunctions and the heart stops working properly. For every minute that passes without a SCA victim receiving resuscitation, the chances of that person surviving decrease 10 percent. After 10 minutes the chances of survival are minimal.

Contacts
Interview Requests & National Media
Shannon Smith
ssmith@smithmediarelations.com
C: (773) 339-7513
O: (616) 724-4256

General Inquires & Portland-Area Media
Brandon Paxton
brandon.paxton@clackamasfire.com
C: (503) 519-4123
P: (503) 294-3555

# # #

Less Story

February 14, 2014 | by

Physio-Control and PulsePoint Foundation Expand CPR and AED Awareness to Hundreds of U.S. Cities

Record number of communities go live on PulsePoint App during American Heart Month

Fire Chiefs

PulsePoint Launch Event

REDMOND, Wash. and PLEASANTON, Calif. – February 14, 2014, Physio-Control, the leading provider of emergency medical response technologies worldwide, and the PulsePoint Foundation, a non-profit organization dedicated to providing mobile technologies to help everyday citizens save lives, today announced that over 200 U.S. cities and communities, across six states will be launching new PulsePoint programs during American Heart Month (February). The communities initiating the program will be promoting the PulsePoint mobile phone app and expanding their citizen responder CPR and public access AED programs to millions of new potential citizen responders.

The PulsePoint app alerts CPR-trained citizens by smartphone of sudden cardiac arrest (SCA) emergencies in their proximity and provides the location of the nearest public access AEDs. Deployment of the PulsePoint app can significantly strengthen the “chain of survival” by improving bystander response to SCA victims in public settings and increasing the chance that lifesaving steps will be taken prior to the arrival of emergency medical services (EMS) professionals. Just two years after launching outside the San Ramon Valley, CA the PulsePoint app has been adopted by over 500 cities in 17 states.

“One of the most exciting things about the growth of PulsePoint is the increasing ability of CPR-trained individuals to share their lifesaving skills seamlessly across agency borders,” said Richard Price, President of the PulsePoint Foundation. “As these connected citizens travel to work, shop in a neighboring town, or travel to another State on vacation, they remain in reach within any PulsePoint-protected community.”

“The multiple PulsePoint app launches taking place during American Heart Month show the power of community momentum around sudden cardiac awareness and the importance of using CPR and AEDs to impact survival rates,” said Physio-Control CEO and president, Brian Webster. “It’s exciting to partner with PulsePoint and communities across the country to expand the reach of lifesaving technologies to the citizen responders.”

Out-of-hospital cardiac arrest is a leading cause of death in the United States, accounting for an estimated 424,000 deaths each year, more than 1,000 deaths per day. The American Heart Association estimates that effective bystander CPR, provided immediately after cardiac arrest, can double or triple a person’s chance of survival. However, less than half of cardiac arrest victims receive bystander CPR and even fewer receive a potentially lifesaving therapeutic shock from a public access AED. Improving bystander CPR rates and access to AEDs is critical to survival. Read more about the Emergency Cardiovascular Care 2020 Impact Goal of doubling out-of-hospital CPR bystander response.

“The American Heart Association is dedicated to strengthening the processes that can improve the chance of surviving sudden cardiac arrest to help save more lives,” said Robert W. Neumar, M.D., Ph.D., professor and chair of the University of Michigan Medical School’s Department of Emergency Medicine. “We are always thrilled to see innovative ways for communities to improve their Chain of Survival. In communities where awareness is high and the Chain of Survival is strong, the usual survival rates for out-of-hospital cardiac arrest can be doubled or tripled,” said Neumar, who serves as Chair of the American Heart Association’s Emergency Cardiovascular Care Committee.

Testimonials from February 14 PulsePoint app activations:

“PulsePoint is the embodiment of a new generation of civic innovation. By combining the rising ubiquity of smartphones with public safety and citizen participation, a new model of community engagement emerges,” said Jonathan Reichental, Ph.D., Chief Information Officer, City of Palo Alto. “PulsePoint brings data and social good to the forefront in saving lives and empowering a more active democracy. It’s the shape of things to come.”

“We have been training our citizens in CPR and facilitating the placement of AEDs throughout our jurisdiction for many years. We’re very excited to now have PulsePoint as the glue to bind it all together,” said Bryan Collins, Fire Chief for the Spokane Valley Fire District in Spokane Washington.

“PulsePoint turns our individual CPR trained citizens into a powerful connected network of first responders,” said Suffolk County Executive Steve Bellone. “By having the ability to alert these individuals to nearby CPR needed events, and informing them of the location of the closest public AED, we believe we can improve the odds of surviving a cardiac arrest on Long Island. We are proud to be the first agency to deploy PulsePoint on the East Coast.”

American Heart Month PulsePoint App launches include:

Aberdeen Fire & Rescue (SD) Palo Alto Fire Department (CA)
Airway Heights (WA) Rocky River Fire Department (OH)
Anderson County Sheriff’s Office (SC) Santa Clara County Fire Department (CA)
Bay Village Fire Department (OH) Santa Clara Fire Department (CA)
Chagrin Falls Fire Department (OH) South Santa Clara County Fire District (CA)
Chagrin Falls Suburban FD (OH) Spokane County Fire District 13 (WA)
Clackamas Fire District 1 (OR) Spokane County Fire District 3 (WA)
Cleveland EMS (OH) Spokane County Fire District 4 (WA)
Fairview Park Fire Department (OH) Spokane County Fire District 8 (WA)
Gilroy Fire Department (CA) Spokane County Fire District 9 (WA)
Medical Lake Fire Department (WA) Spokane Fire Department (WA)
Milpitas Fire Department (CA) Spokane Valley Fire Department (WA)
Morgan Hill FD/CAL FIRE (CA) Suffolk County Fire, Rescue and Emergency Services (NY)
Mountain View Fire Department (CA) Sunnyvale Department of Public Safety (CA)
North Ridgeville Fire Department (OH) Westlake Fire Department (OH)
Orange Village Fire Department (OH) Woodmere Fire Department (OH)
North Olmsted Fire Department (OH)

About Physio-Control
Physio-Control, Inc. is headquartered in Redmond, Washington. The company operates in over 100 countries and is the world’s leading provider of professional emergency medical response solutions that predict or intervene in life threatening emergencies. To learn more visit Physio-Control.com, or connect with us at @PhysioControl , www.facebook.com/physiocontrolinc or www.linkedin.com/company/physio-control-inc-.

About the PulsePoint Foundation
PulsePoint is a 501(c)(3) non-profit foundation based in the San Francisco Bay Area. Its mission is to make it much easier for citizens who are trained in CPR to use their life saving skills to do just that…save lives! Through the use of modern, location-aware mobile devices PulsePoint is building applications that work with local public safety agencies to improve communications with citizens and empower them to help reduce the millions of annual deaths from sudden cardiac arrest. Learn more at www.pulsepoint.org or join the conversation at www.facebook.com/PulsePoint and @PulsePoint.

Media Contact: Jennifer Roth / Physio-Control / jennifer.m.roth@physio-control.com / Tel: 206.617.4167

###

Full Story

September 13, 2013 | by

PulsePoint Foundation and Physio-Control Partner to Save Lives

In one of our initial segments from EMS World Expo in Las Vegas, MedicCast host Jamie Davis, the Podmedic was joined by Physio-Control, Inc CEO Brian Webster and PulsePoint Foundation President, Richard Price to talk about their ground breaking partnership to get more CPR trained responders to cardiac arrest patients around the world.

Click here if video not displaying properly.

The novel PulsePoint app alerts CPR-trained citizens by smartphone of SCA (sudden cardiac arrest) emergencies in their proximity and provides the location of the nearest public access AEDs. Deployment of the PulsePoint app can significantly strengthen the “chain of survival” by improving bystander response to SCA victims and increasing the chance that lifesaving steps will be taken prior to the arrival of emergency medical services (EMS) professionals.

Brian and Richard share with Jamie some of the history of the partnership and what will happen moving forward as Physio-Control brings its global marketing efforts to bear on building awareness and usage of the Pulse Point mobile app in communities. We are certainly looking forward to more in the near future as more lives are saved by bystanders using this app to be called to help out.

The PulsePoint smartphone app is available to the public free of charge for Apple iOS and Google Android devices from the Apple App Store and Google Play. Public safety agencies interested in learning more about implementing PulsePoint in their communities should contact their local Physio-Control representative or call 800-442-1142.

Full Story

September 12, 2013 | by

New mobile app takes CPR to the next level

Using crowdsourcing to connect trained citizens to cardiac arrest victims

EMS1.com LogoIf you have any experience in EMS, it should be pretty evident that survival from sudden cardiac arrest is wholly dependent on a system of careful steps that are rapidly and reliably implemented. Nowhere is it more crucial than right up front – when the patient collapses. Every minute it takes for professional responders to arrive at the patient’s side translates to the increasing probability that the patient will not survive. Unless the bystander is in the immediate vicinity of the patient – in the same room literally – that cardiac arrest will not receive the benefit of early CPR and defibrillation.

It would make a lot of sense to somehow be able to locate laypersons trained in CPR in the vicinity of a possible cardiac arrest and guide them to the scene. Add to that the ability to locate a nearby AED and you have an infrastructure that gives the patient a fighting chance of survival. Question is, how can that be done?

Well, technology steps in and provides a solution. During the 2013 EMSWorld Convention and Trade Show, Physio-Control announced that they were partnering with the PulsePoint Foundation to speed up implementation of what is essentially a crowdsourcing solution.

PulsePoint is a technology that harnesses the power of smartphones to receive information about a cardiac arrest that has happened within their vicinity through a free mobile app. The information is fed through software that is embedded within that community’s public safety answering point’s (PSAP) communication system, which functions silently in the background as the telecommunicator takes the initial call and dispatches resources. The app also provides potential CPR-trained bystanders with the location of any nearby AEDs.

Read the full story by Art Hsieh at EMS1.

Full Story