July 17, 2017 | by

International Association of Fire Chiefs and PulsePoint Foundation Announce Global Strategic Partnership to Increase Cardiac Arrest Survival Rates

Collaboration aims to increase awareness and use of PulsePoint and expand the role of fire and emergency services in emerging digital trends.

Fairfax, VA (July 17, 2017) — The International Association of Fire Chiefs (IAFC) and the PulsePoint Foundation (PulsePoint) today announced a strategic partnership to reinforce the use of mobile phones and apps to connect nearby CPR-trained citizens and off-duty professional rescuers with people in cardiac arrest. The collaboration also endeavors to develop strategies for utilizing public safety data in new and innovative ways. The alliance will be highlighted at Fire-Rescue International, the annual conference and expo of the IAFC being held in Charlotte, NC, July 26-29, 2017.

The PulsePoint app connects directly to local emergency communication centers. When an incident requiring CPR and an AED (Automated External Defibrillator) is reported, nearby citizens and off-duty responders who carry the app receive a notification of the emergency simultaneously with traditional first responders. PulsePoint reduces collapse-to-CPR times by increasing awareness of cardiac arrest events beyond a traditional “witnessed” area. The system also aims to reduce collapse-to-defibrillation times through augmented awareness of AED locations.

“As a past fire chief and longtime member of the IAFC, I’m very familiar with the leadership this organization provides the industry,” said Richard Price, President of the California-based 501(c)(3) nonprofit PulsePoint Foundation. “PulsePoint is using mobile technology to save lives and is pioneering uses of public safety data that until recently were unimaginable. This partnership will explore future data uses and develop strategies to help make public safety agencies more effective and impactful in their communities.”

Each year, approximately 350,000 cardiac arrests occur outside a hospital setting in the United States. Nearly 90 percent of these events prove fatal, and the chance of survival decreases by ten percent with every passing minute without CPR.

Chief John Sinclair

“The IAFC considers the deployment of PulsePoint to be a best practice in fire and EMS and we look forward to helping our member agencies implement the technology. Recognizing the excruciatingly short window of opportunity to intervene during cardiac arrest, we need to reinforce the importance of improving the utilization of CPR-trained community members and off-duty personnel,” said John Sinclair, President of the IAFC and Fire Chief of Kittitas Valley (Wash.) Fire and Rescue.

Chief Tom Jenkins

Thomas Jenkins, IAFC First Vice President and Fire Chief of Rogers (Ark.) Fire Department emphasized the importance of PulsePoint to his community: “In Rogers, we have seen PulsePoint bring together the best of citizenship, technology, and medical care to save lives from cardiac arrest.”

Chief Billy Goldfeder
Chief Billy Goldfeder

“In addition to its flagship capability of summoning CPR assistance, the PulsePoint app displays other emergency activity occurring in the community. For on duty crews this can significantly improve situational awareness and confirm the real-time communication center connection to the public,” said Deputy Chief Billy Goldfeder, International Director of the IAFC Safety, Health and Survival Section. “This makes the app much more interesting and engaging for citizens and off-duty personnel—ultimately increasing the size of the network available for cardiac arrest response.”

Chief Mike Duyck
Chief Mike Duyck

As part of the IAFC collaboration, PulsePoint has also partnered with the Western Fire Chiefs Association (WFCA) to increase awareness of the application and its lifesaving benefits. According to Mike Duyck, WFCA Director and Fire Chief of Tualatin Valley (Ore.) Fire & Rescue, “TVF&R was the first fire department in Oregon to launch the PulsePoint app for citizen responders and over the past four years we have witnessed firsthand its ability to save lives. We are now the first agency to pilot the professional version of the app, Verified Responder, which based on results to date, may mark the beginning of a national initiative with the help of the IAFC. Having lost my own father from sudden cardiac arrest, I am personally and professionally committed to sparing other families from potential heartbreak.”

About the International Association of Fire Chiefs (IAFC)
The IAFC represents the leadership of firefighters and emergency responders worldwide. IAFC members are the world’s leading experts in firefighting, emergency medical services, terrorism response, hazardous materials spills, natural disasters, search and rescue, and public safety legislation. Since 1873, the IAFC has provided a forum for its members to exchange ideas, develop professionally and uncover the latest products and services available to first responders.

About the PulsePoint Foundation
PulsePoint is a 501(c)(3) non-profit foundation based in the San Francisco Bay Area. Through the use of location-aware mobile devices, PulsePoint is building applications that work with local public safety agencies to improve communications with citizens and off-duty personnel, empowering them to help reduce the millions of annual deaths from sudden cardiac arrest. Learn more at pulsepoint.org or join the conversation at Facebook and Twitter. The free app is available for download on iTunes and Google Play.

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Media Contacts
Jim Philipps
jphilipps@iafc.org
(703) 537-4829

Shannon Smith
shannon@pulsepoint.org
(773) 339-7513

Source: IAFC Press Release

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June 8, 2017 | by

New Program Combines Off-Duty Professional Firefighters, Technology, and Defibrillators to help Save Lives

Sioux Falls, South Dakota (June 8, 2017): Sioux Falls will be the second site in the United States selected for a pilot program to utilize off-duty professional firefighters in response to cardiac arrest calls in public and private settings.

The Verified Responder Pilot Program is being launched in Sioux Falls through a partnership of the PulsePoint Foundation, Sioux Falls Fire Rescue, International Association of Firefighters Local 814, and automated external defibrillator (AED) manufacturer Philips. The first pilot site for the Verified Responder program was implemented earlier this year with Tualatin Valley Fire & Rescue in Oregon.

More than 350,000 Americans each year have an out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) where the heart stops beating, and only 12 percent survive, according to the American Heart Association. The chance of survival decreases by ten percent with every passing minute without CPR.

“Although survival rates in the Sioux Falls area are above the national average, our community continues to strive to increase a person’s chance of survival during a sudden cardiac event,” says Brad Goodroad, Sioux Falls Fire Rescue Chief. “We know that survival relies on early CPR and early defibrillation.”

The community has already been using PulsePoint Respond, a software application designed to support public safety agencies in improving cardiac arrest survival rates by notifying CPR-trained volunteers if someone nearby in a public location is having a cardiac emergency. Since its introduction five years ago, the PulsePoint application has saved numerous lives in the United States when cardiac arrest happened in public places. However, there were no programs in the United States with the ability to respond to a home or private location prior to or along with emergency responders, and the Verified Responder program allows us to close that gap.

The Verified Responder Pilot Program utilizes the PulsePoint application. In addition, Philips Healthcare has provided AEDs to participating firefighters who can then respond to cardiac emergencies. Participating professional firefighters are certified emergency medical technicians or paramedics who receive background checks as part of employment with Sioux Falls Fire Rescue.

The effort will gather important data from the Sioux Falls pilot for future lifesaving strategies and products. During the pilot, King County Emergency Medical Services in Washington State will assist with programmatic evaluation for potential expansion to additional communities.

“We were proud to introduce PulsePoint to Sioux Falls several years ago,” says Goodroad, “and we are honored to be the second site in the country selected for the Verified Responder program. Sudden cardiac arrest strikes without warning, and our team is dedicated to improving survival rates in our community.”

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Contact
Jeff Helm, Division Chief
Sioux Falls Fire Rescue
605-367-8078

Source: City of Sioux Falls Press Release

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Scott and Drew

June 3, 2014 | by

Smartphone app saves Milwaukie man’s life

CLACKAMAS, Ore. — A Milwaukie man believes a new smartphone app called PulsePoint saved his life when there were only minutes to spare.

May 9th seemed like a regular day for Drew Basse. The truck driver worked out at the 24-Hour Fitness on S.E. Sunnybrook Blvd. in Clackamas and then walked to his car.

Suddenly, he started feeling tired and light-headed. He doesn’t even remember what happened next: He had a massive heart attack.

“I was completely, completely gone,” Basse said as he talked to reporters from his bed at a rehabilitation center days later.

Luckily, a security guard had been watching and called Clackamas County 911, who sent out a PulsePoint alert. Off duty firefighter Scott Brawner was exercising inside the very same 24-Hour Fitness and his phone started buzzing.

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“When the app went off, I’d never heard it before. It turned my radio off and gave me a series of beeps,” Brawner said as he stood next to Basse’s hospital bed.

He had downloaded the app and checked the box that said he was willing to step in during an emergency nearby to give CPR.

The app brought up a GPS map with real-time locations of both men and that’s when Brawner saw the security guard kneeled down by Basse’s car door. He rushed over, saw that Basse, just seconds before, had a heart attack and he started doing hard and fast, hands-only CPR within one minute of the PulsePoint alert.

Paramedics came and Basse was brought back. He had surgery to install a pacemaker on his heart and will be recovering for the next six weeks. Doctors said he has no cognitive damage.

Both men are giving PulsePoint a lot of credit. “This PulsePoint app, it’s just a must,” Basse said. “It needs to get out to everybody, wherever people have a computer. They should make it mandatory on your phone.”

They also agree that it saved a life on May 9th.

“In a matter of minutes, somebody is there to save your life.” Basse said. “That’s what Scott did. He saved my life. I wouldn’t be here right now if it wasn’t for him.”

“I would love to see other people do the same thing,” Brawner said. “If you have the opportunity to do CPR, I mean just look at what we’ve given Drew back with everybody that’s helped him.”

Individual fire departments sign on to be a part of PulsePoint. It’s a non-profit and fairly new, so Clark County, Clackamas, and Tualatin Valley Fire and Rescue are the only local departments that have launched it at this time.

View the newscast and full story by Nina Mehlhaf at KGW.

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Drew Basse and Scott Brawner

May 27, 2014 | by

PulsePoint App Saves Life of Cardiac Arrest Victim

Life-saving CPR performed after mobile app notifies nearby off-duty firefighter

CFD #1 LogoCLACKAMAS, Ore., May 28, 2014 – On Friday, May 9, 2014 off-duty firefighter Scott Brawner was working out at a local health club when he received an alert through PulsePoint, a 9-1-1 connected mobile app designed to alert CPR-trained citizens of Sudden Cardiac Arrest (SCA) emergencies in their proximity. This alert saved a man’s life.

Using the map presented by the PulsePoint app, Scott immediately made his way to the reported patient location. In less than a minute, Scott found the man unconscious in the parking lot outside of the health facility where a security guard had first found him unresponsive and called 9-1-1. Scott immediately assessed and began hands-only CPR. He continued providing chest compressions until paramedics from American Medical Response (AMR) and Clackamas Fire District #1 arrived to provide advanced care.

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“As a fire fighter I know that every minute that passes without a SCA victim receiving resuscitation, the chances of that person surviving decrease 10 percent.” said Scott Brawner, Firefighter/Paramedic with Tualatin Valley Fire & Rescue (TVF&R). “By adopting PulsePoint, agencies are removing much of the fate and luck in survival by involving CPR-trained citizen rescuers in cardiac arrest response.”

On Saturday, May 17, 2014, at Adventist Medical Center in Portland, Oregon, Scott had the opportunity to meet the man he had saved just a week prior. His name is Drew Basse, a 57-year-old truck driver from Milwaukie, Oregon. Scott also met Drew’s son Shane, 31, and daughter Staci, 27. It was an emotional meeting filled with gratitude and appreciation as Drew is expected to fully recover with no loss of cognitive function because CPR was administered so quickly. The family was especially interested in learning more about the “miracle app” they had heard played such a key role in Drew’s survival.

“This app saved my Dad’s life,” said Shane Basse, “We’re so grateful to the PulsePoint Foundation for creating this life-saving app, Scott Brawner for his heroic actions and Clackamas Fire for not only their quick response, but for adopting this technology.”

“The PulsePoint app did its job by alerting a Good Samaritan simultaneously with the dispatch of our crews, ” said Bill Conway, EMS Officer for Clackamas Fire District #1. “This incredibly positive outcome is why Clackamas Fire, like so many organizations throughout the U.S., invested in this type of technology.”

The app on Scott’s phone is from the non-profit PulsePoint Foundation. The app is designed to reduce collapse-to-CPR and collapse-to-defibrillation times by increasing citizen awareness of cardiac events beyond a traditional “witnessed” area and by displaying the precise location of nearby public access defibrillators (AEDs).

About the PulsePoint Foundation
PulsePoint is a 501(c)(3) non-profit foundation based in the San Francisco Bay Area. Its mission is to make it much easier for citizens who are trained in CPR to use their life-saving skills to do just that…save lives! Through the use of modern, location-aware mobile devices PulsePoint is building applications that work with local public safety agencies to improve communications with citizens and empower them to help reduce the millions of annual deaths from sudden cardiac arrest.

Deployment of the PulsePoint app can significantly strengthen the “chain of survival” by improving bystander response to SCA victims in public settings and increasing the chance that lifesaving steps will be taken prior to the arrival of emergency medical services (EMS) professionals. Just two years after launching outside the San Ramon Valley (CA) the PulsePoint app has been adopted in 600 cities and communities in 18 states.

PulsePoint is built and maintained by volunteer engineers at Workday, a Silicon Valley-based company that creates enterprise cloud applications, and distributed by Physio-Control. The original idea came from Richard Price, the former chief of the San Ramon Valley Fire Department who wanted to bridge the gap between the critical minutes following SCA and the 13 million Americans who are CPR trained, but often don’t know their skills are required.

The PulsePoint app is available for iPhone and Android and can be downloaded from the iTunes Store™ and Google Play™. Learn more at www.pulsepoint.org.

About Clackamas Fire District #1
Clackamas Fire District #1 provides fire, rescue, and emergency medical services to the cities of Milwaukie, Oregon City, Happy Valley, Johnson City and a portion of Damascus as well as the unincorporated areas of Oak Lodge, Clackamas, Westwood, Carver, Redland, Beavercreek, Carus, Clarkes, and South End/Central Point.

The District has 17 fire stations strategically located throughout Clackamas County with a workforce of more than 200 employees and 100 volunteers. It is the second largest fire protection district in Oregon serving over 179,000 citizens in an area covering nearly 200 square miles.

Clackamas Fire District #1 is a CFAI Accredited agency meeting the highest standards in emergency service delivery.

About TVF&R
Tualatin Valley Fire & Rescue provides fire protection and emergency medical services to approximately 454,000 citizens in one of the fastest growing regions in Oregon. The District’s 210 square mile service area includes the cities of Beaverton, Durham, King City, Rivergrove, Sherwood, Tigard, Tualatin, West Linn, and Wilsonville, and unincorporated portions of Clackamas, Multnomah, and Washington County. TVF&R is a CFAI Accredited agency.

About Cardiac Arrest
Out-of-hospital cardiac arrest is a leading cause of death in the United States, accounting for an estimated 424,000 deaths each year, more than 1,000 deaths per day. The American Heart Association estimates that effective bystander CPR, provided immediately after cardiac arrest, can double or triple a person’s chance of survival. However, less than half of cardiac arrest victims receive bystander CPR and even fewer receive a potentially lifesaving therapeutic shock from a public access AED. Improving bystander CPR rates and access to AEDs is critical to survival.

Different than a heart attack, sudden cardiac arrest is caused when the heart’s electrical system malfunctions and the heart stops working properly. For every minute that passes without a SCA victim receiving resuscitation, the chances of that person surviving decrease 10 percent. After 10 minutes the chances of survival are minimal.

Contacts
Interview Requests & National Media
Shannon Smith
ssmith@smithmediarelations.com
C: (773) 339-7513
O: (616) 724-4256

General Inquires & Portland-Area Media
Brandon Paxton
brandon.paxton@clackamasfire.com
C: (503) 519-4123
P: (503) 294-3555

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June 29, 2013 | by

PulsePoint Responder – In Her Own Words

On March 27th 2013, the PulsePoint mobile app deployed in Tualatin Valley Fire and Rescue notified three nearby citizen responders that someone close to their location was in need of CPR. Heather Roms, who is an RN for Legacy Emanuel Medical Center in Portland, was just leaving a nearby business when she received the PulsePoint notification on her smartphone. Heather responded and began CPR until EMS crews arrived. Heather stated that she heard about the app from her mother who works at a nearby middle school and was happy to be available to respond and help. Watch her story below.

Click here if video not displaying properly.

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