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August 25, 2015 | by

Thousands of San Diegans Register for Life-Saving Apps

More than 35,000 San Diego County residents now receive alerts on their phones letting them know of a chance to potentially save someone’s life nearby.

That’s how many people have downloaded and registered for the PulsePoint Respond app in the past year since it launched locally. The app, which is free, lets users trained in CPR know when and where their help is needed.

A second app, called PulsePoint AED, lets users know where automatic external defibrillators (AED) are located nearby. The chance of saving a victim of cardiac arrest doubles when AEDs are used in addition to CPR.

The mobile apps were launched in July 2014 and March 2015 in a partnership between the County, City of San Diego, San Diego County Fire Chiefs’ Association, American Medical Response, Rural/Metro and the PulsePoint Foundation.

San Diego PulsePoint Launch

More than 1,800 local AEDs are also now listed in the PulsePoint AED app. As part of the crowdsourcing campaign in March, participants competed for prizes by using the app to identify both new and existing AEDs to expand the database of AED locations. The effort increased awareness about both apps and resulted in the registration of dozens of new AEDs.

“The more users we can add, and AEDs we can register, the more lives we have a chance to save,” said San Diego County Board of Supervisors Chairman Bill Horn. “By working together to introduce and integrate this technology into the community, we are making San Diego a safer place to live.”

San Diego iPhone 6 AED MapThe crowdsourcing campaign participants received “points” for registering AEDs in the community. The Wireless Foundation launched an accompanying Twitter campaign to encourage San Diego residents to join the contest. Joe Ferraro, an Assistant Chief of Emergency Medical Services for the Miramar Fire Department, received the most points and won a new iPad, courtesy of American Medical Response. Other prizes included a signed Chargers football, signed Padres hat, Balboa Park and Midway Museum passes and Amazon gift cards.

“I want to thank all of the county residents who helped us add and verify AEDs through PulsePoint,” said Supervisor Ron Roberts, who led the effort to bring PulsePoint and its sister app to all of San Diego County. “Their efforts are making a difference. Chief Ferraro himself is a great example of how our firefighters are embracing PulsePoint. It’s also exciting to see the two apps bringing the community and first responders together in a joint effort.”

The PulsePoint app has proven especially popular with emergency responders.

“PulsePoint is something all of the local fire agencies are excited about,” said Don Butz, President of the San Diego County Fire Chiefs’ Association and Chief of Viejas Fire Department. “We’ve encouraged all of our firefighters and paramedics to download the app. It’s our way of always being available to save a life, even when we’re not on-duty. I encourage every resident who has CPR training to download the app and join our effort.”

The way the app works is all registered users who are within a quarter mile of someone in cardiac distress receives an alert on their phone asking them to respond. Up pops a map on your smartphone, as well as the location of an AED device if one is nearby.

Both of the free apps are available through Google Play or the Apple App Store. While the campaign is over, it’s still important to register AEDs with PulsePoint AED as it could save the life of someone in need. San Diegans are also encouraged to get trained in CPR, learn how to use AEDs, and sign up to receive the PulsePoint alerts and respond if needed. The American Red Cross, American Heart Association, and San Diego Project Heartbeat provide CPR and AED trainings throughout the year.

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Source: San Diego County News Center

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March 16, 2015 | by

San Diego County, City, Fire Chiefs Launch AED App, Crowdsourcing Campaign

Someone collapses nearby you at the gym, the store or even at work. They are showing the classic signs of sudden cardiac arrest: no heartbeat, no breathing. What do you do? How can you help?

Finding and deploying an automated external defibrillator (AED) can help save a life in those critical minutes before a paramedic arrives. In fact, you’re twice as likely to survive an out-of-hospital cardiac arrest if you receive both cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) and AED assistance, compared to CPR alone.

Knowing where AEDs are located during an emergency is at the heart of a new crowdsourcing campaign launched by the County of San Diego, City of San Diego and San Diego County Fire Chiefs’ Association at a news conference Monday at the County’s Waterfront Park. The goal is to create a robust electronic map identifying the location of AEDs in the region, using a new app called PulsePoint AED. The PulsePoint AED app is the companion app to the PulsePoint Respond app, recently launched in San Diego County, which notifies nearby responders of a cardiac emergency through a “CPR needed” alert, providing a map of the emergency’s location and identifying nearby approved AEDs.

County Board of Supervisors Chairman Bill Horn, Supervisor Ron Roberts, San Diego Fire-Rescue Chief Javier Mainar and San Diego County Fire Chiefs’ Association President Don Butz and other local fire and government officials on Monday asked for the public’s help in using the app to locate additional AEDs in the County as part of the crowdsourcing campaign. Members of the public who register the most AEDs will earn prizes as part of a contest organized by the PulsePoint Foundation. Prizes will include an iPad donated by American Medical Response, an autographed football from the San Diego Chargers, Amazon gift cards donated by PulsePoint, a family four pack of tickets to the USS Midway Museum, two pairs of One-Day Explorer passes to Balboa Park donated by the Balboa Park Cultural Partnership and an autographed Padres hat donated by the team.

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“Introducing this app today is yet another way to make heart health a priority and to boost survival rates for cardiac arrest victims,” said Bill Horn, Chairman of the County Board of Supervisors. “Now citizens can play a key role. We need your help.”

Horn also announced that the County plans to purchase about 30 new AED devices to place in Sheriff’’s supervisor vehicles.

The new app was developed by the Pleasanton, California-based nonprofit PulsePoint Foundation and distributed by Redmond, Washington-based emergency medical device company Physio-Control, Inc. San Diego has used the PulsePoint AED app to build one of the most extensive and model AED registries in the country.

“This new technology is going to help us create the most comprehensive database of AEDs we’ve ever had in the region,” said Supervisor Ron Roberts. “As citizens, we can help one another in previously unheard-of ways.”

Roberts said the app is just the latest heart health advancement in the region, along with Love Your Heart, Strike Out Stroke and Sidewalk CPR day.

The PulsePoint AED app allows anyone in the community to submit an AED, including the exact location, description and photo of the AED. All submitted AEDs are verified by San Diego EMS professionals before they appear in PulsePoint Respond. When PulsePoint Respond issues a “CPR needed” alert, providing the location of the emergency, it also provides the location of the nearest AEDs.

“We’ve already had great success registering more than a thousand AEDs across the City of San Diego through the PulsePoint AED app,” said San Diego Fire-Rescue Chief Javier Mainar. “We’re asking for citizens to help build out a similar system throughout the region.”

Chief Don Butz, the President of the San Diego County Fire Chiefs’ Association, said fire agencies around the county are behind the effort.

“Every minute does make a difference when it comes to sudden cardiac arrest,” said Butz. “Each minute a victim waits for CPR, their chance of survival drops by up to 10 percent. In those moments before our first responders arrive, citizens can make a difference. Knowing where AEDs are is a big piece of the puzzle.”

Officials also demonstrated how to use an AED, and American Medical Response provided free CPR training and AED instruction and taught citizens how to use the new PulsePoint AED app from noon-3 p.m. on the south side of the County Administration Center building near the snack bar.

You can download the apps through Google Play or the Apple App Store, start registering AEDs with PulsePoint AED and be eligible to win a prize. You’re also encouraged to get trained in CPR and how to use AEDs and sign up to receive the alerts when your help may be needed. The American Red Cross, American Heart Association, and San Diego Project Heartbeat provide trainings throughout the year. You may just help save someone’s life.

For more information, visit the County’s PulsePoint information page or to download the apps, visit PulsePoint.

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July 28, 2014 | by

San Diego County, City, Fire Partners Activate Life-saving CPR App

Technology Helps Citizens Become Heroes

NEWS RELEASE
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
July 28, 2014
Contacts: County: Michele Clock 619-531-4506
City: Lee Swanson 619-533-3780

Every minute a victim of sudden cardiac arrest waits for CPR, their chance of survival drops by up to 10 percent.

After four to six minutes, brain damage begins to occur.

After 10 minutes, it’s often too late. Few resuscitation attempts succeed.

Now PulsePoint, an innovative new smartphone application, lets citizens trained in CPR know when their help is needed, allowing them to step in during those critical moments before a paramedic arrives. It is now available in the San Diego region, thanks to the County and a coalition of local agencies.

County Supervisors Ron Roberts and Bill Horn, San Diego Mayor Kevin L. Faulconer, San Diego County Fire Chiefs’ Association President Dave Hanneman and other local fire and government officials on Monday announced the arrival of the cutting-edge technology at a news conference at San Diego Fire-Rescue Department’s Fire Station 1.

“Sudden cardiac arrest is a leading cause of death in our country, and just 8 percent of those who experience it survive,” Supervisor Ron Roberts said. “We can do better. This app can help us change these grim statistics.”

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The region is one of the largest in the U.S. to launch the app, which was developed by the Pleasanton, California-based nonprofit PulsePoint Foundation and distributed by Redmond, Washington-based emergency medical device company Physio-Control, Inc. San Diego joins the more than 500 localities around the nation that have begun using the app. Also available on Monday is compression-only CPR training from local ambulance providers Rural/Metro and American Medical Response.

“San Diego is again on health care’s leading edge by adopting this technology,” said Mayor Kevin L. Faulconer. “It is going to allow us as citizens to help one another in previously unimaginable ways. But it’s up to us to get trained, download this tool and use it.”

Mayor Kevin Faulconer

“Most of us have a friend or loved one who has suffered with a heart condition,” said Supervisor Bill Horn. “Sudden cardiac arrest can happen to one of those individuals, or out of the blue to any of us, at any time. You never know who or when you may be in the right place at the right time to help someone, thanks to this app.”

When a 9-1-1 call for sudden cardiac arrest comes in, an alert goes to the app at the same time first responders are dispatched. Citizens who are signed up for the app and nearby the incident are notified of the location of the victim as well as the closest publicly accessible AEDs.

How effective the app is in a community depends on citizen involvement. Get trained in CPR and sign up to receive the alerts. The American Red Cross, American Heart Association, and San Diego Project Heartbeat provide trainings throughout the year. You never know, you may just help save someone’s life! So please download the app through Google play or the Apple App store. Also available through PulsePoint is a companion app called PulsePoint AED, which allows the public to register the locations of publicly accessible AEDs in their community.

Cox Communications is supporting this program by airing this public service announcement (PSA) promoting the PulsePoint app on local cable channels. For more information, visit the County’s PulsePoint information page or to download the apps, visit PulsePoint.

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July 25, 2014 | by

County, City, Fire Partners to Launch Life-saving CPR App

Region is among the largest in U.S. to adopt technology

MEDIA ADVISORY
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
July 25, 2014
Contacts: County: Michele Clock 619-531-4506
City: Lee Swanson 619-533-3780

WHAT: The County of San Diego, City of San Diego, San Diego County Fire Chiefs’ Association and other local agencies have joined forces to launch a regional smartphone application that lets citizens trained in CPR know when their assistance is urgently needed in the critical moments before paramedics arrive. The app, called PulsePoint, was designed to quickly bring help to victims of Sudden Cardiac Arrest (SCA). The region is one of the largest in the U.S. to activate the app. Officials will discuss the technology’s potential, how citizens can use it and where to learn compression-only CPR tactics for free starting Monday (note: not for certification).

WHEN: Monday, July 28, 11 a.m.

WHERE: San Diego Fire-Rescue Department’s Fire Station 1
1222 First Ave., San Diego, CA 92101

WHO: Kevin L. Faulconer, San Diego Mayor
Ron Roberts, County Supervisor (District 4)
Bill Horn, County Supervisor (District 5)
Chief Dave Hanneman, San Diego County Fire Chiefs’ Association President
Tom Johnson, Sudden Cardiac Arrest Survivor

WHY: Sudden Cardiac Arrest is one of the leading causes of death in the United States. Many adults are trained in CPR, but often are not aware of when their help is needed. Less than 8 percent of victims survive the condition. But a coalition of local leaders hopes to change that with this app.

VISUALS: Emergency response officials, firefighters, San Diego Fire-Rescue Department fire station backdrop, compression-only CPR demonstration available, Automated External Defibrillator (AED) display, posters of smartphone with app on the screen and infographic. Also Monday: Members of the public learning compression-only CPR and how to use the new PulsePoint app at the County Administration Center’s Waterfront Park (south side) noon – 3 p.m. taught by Rural/Metro, and the public learning compression-only CPR at Moonlight Beach in Encinitas 10 a.m. – 4 p.m. taught by American Medical Response, City of Encinitas Lifeguards and City of Encinitas Fire Department.

For more information or to download the apps, visit PulsePoint. Cox Communications will air this PSA on the app locally.

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Drew Basse and Scott Brawner

May 27, 2014 | by

PulsePoint App Saves Life of Cardiac Arrest Victim

Life-saving CPR performed after mobile app notifies nearby off-duty firefighter

CFD #1 LogoCLACKAMAS, Ore., May 28, 2014 – On Friday, May 9, 2014 off-duty firefighter Scott Brawner was working out at a local health club when he received an alert through PulsePoint, a 9-1-1 connected mobile app designed to alert CPR-trained citizens of Sudden Cardiac Arrest (SCA) emergencies in their proximity. This alert saved a man’s life.

Using the map presented by the PulsePoint app, Scott immediately made his way to the reported patient location. In less than a minute, Scott found the man unconscious in the parking lot outside of the health facility where a security guard had first found him unresponsive and called 9-1-1. Scott immediately assessed and began hands-only CPR. He continued providing chest compressions until paramedics from American Medical Response (AMR) and Clackamas Fire District #1 arrived to provide advanced care.

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“As a fire fighter I know that every minute that passes without a SCA victim receiving resuscitation, the chances of that person surviving decrease 10 percent.” said Scott Brawner, Firefighter/Paramedic with Tualatin Valley Fire & Rescue (TVF&R). “By adopting PulsePoint, agencies are removing much of the fate and luck in survival by involving CPR-trained citizen rescuers in cardiac arrest response.”

On Saturday, May 17, 2014, at Adventist Medical Center in Portland, Oregon, Scott had the opportunity to meet the man he had saved just a week prior. His name is Drew Basse, a 57-year-old truck driver from Milwaukie, Oregon. Scott also met Drew’s son Shane, 31, and daughter Staci, 27. It was an emotional meeting filled with gratitude and appreciation as Drew is expected to fully recover with no loss of cognitive function because CPR was administered so quickly. The family was especially interested in learning more about the “miracle app” they had heard played such a key role in Drew’s survival.

“This app saved my Dad’s life,” said Shane Basse, “We’re so grateful to the PulsePoint Foundation for creating this life-saving app, Scott Brawner for his heroic actions and Clackamas Fire for not only their quick response, but for adopting this technology.”

“The PulsePoint app did its job by alerting a Good Samaritan simultaneously with the dispatch of our crews, ” said Bill Conway, EMS Officer for Clackamas Fire District #1. “This incredibly positive outcome is why Clackamas Fire, like so many organizations throughout the U.S., invested in this type of technology.”

The app on Scott’s phone is from the non-profit PulsePoint Foundation. The app is designed to reduce collapse-to-CPR and collapse-to-defibrillation times by increasing citizen awareness of cardiac events beyond a traditional “witnessed” area and by displaying the precise location of nearby public access defibrillators (AEDs).

About the PulsePoint Foundation
PulsePoint is a 501(c)(3) non-profit foundation based in the San Francisco Bay Area. Its mission is to make it much easier for citizens who are trained in CPR to use their life-saving skills to do just that…save lives! Through the use of modern, location-aware mobile devices PulsePoint is building applications that work with local public safety agencies to improve communications with citizens and empower them to help reduce the millions of annual deaths from sudden cardiac arrest.

Deployment of the PulsePoint app can significantly strengthen the “chain of survival” by improving bystander response to SCA victims in public settings and increasing the chance that lifesaving steps will be taken prior to the arrival of emergency medical services (EMS) professionals. Just two years after launching outside the San Ramon Valley (CA) the PulsePoint app has been adopted in 600 cities and communities in 18 states.

PulsePoint is built and maintained by volunteer engineers at Workday, a Silicon Valley-based company that creates enterprise cloud applications, and distributed by Physio-Control. The original idea came from Richard Price, the former chief of the San Ramon Valley Fire Department who wanted to bridge the gap between the critical minutes following SCA and the 13 million Americans who are CPR trained, but often don’t know their skills are required.

The PulsePoint app is available for iPhone and Android and can be downloaded from the iTunes Store™ and Google Play™. Learn more at www.pulsepoint.org.

About Clackamas Fire District #1
Clackamas Fire District #1 provides fire, rescue, and emergency medical services to the cities of Milwaukie, Oregon City, Happy Valley, Johnson City and a portion of Damascus as well as the unincorporated areas of Oak Lodge, Clackamas, Westwood, Carver, Redland, Beavercreek, Carus, Clarkes, and South End/Central Point.

The District has 17 fire stations strategically located throughout Clackamas County with a workforce of more than 200 employees and 100 volunteers. It is the second largest fire protection district in Oregon serving over 179,000 citizens in an area covering nearly 200 square miles.

Clackamas Fire District #1 is a CFAI Accredited agency meeting the highest standards in emergency service delivery.

About TVF&R
Tualatin Valley Fire & Rescue provides fire protection and emergency medical services to approximately 454,000 citizens in one of the fastest growing regions in Oregon. The District’s 210 square mile service area includes the cities of Beaverton, Durham, King City, Rivergrove, Sherwood, Tigard, Tualatin, West Linn, and Wilsonville, and unincorporated portions of Clackamas, Multnomah, and Washington County. TVF&R is a CFAI Accredited agency.

About Cardiac Arrest
Out-of-hospital cardiac arrest is a leading cause of death in the United States, accounting for an estimated 424,000 deaths each year, more than 1,000 deaths per day. The American Heart Association estimates that effective bystander CPR, provided immediately after cardiac arrest, can double or triple a person’s chance of survival. However, less than half of cardiac arrest victims receive bystander CPR and even fewer receive a potentially lifesaving therapeutic shock from a public access AED. Improving bystander CPR rates and access to AEDs is critical to survival.

Different than a heart attack, sudden cardiac arrest is caused when the heart’s electrical system malfunctions and the heart stops working properly. For every minute that passes without a SCA victim receiving resuscitation, the chances of that person surviving decrease 10 percent. After 10 minutes the chances of survival are minimal.

Contacts
Interview Requests & National Media
Shannon Smith
ssmith@smithmediarelations.com
C: (773) 339-7513
O: (616) 724-4256

General Inquires & Portland-Area Media
Brandon Paxton
brandon.paxton@clackamasfire.com
C: (503) 519-4123
P: (503) 294-3555

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February 14, 2014 | by

Announcing the Rollout of PulsePoint in Spokane County

Media Contact: Captain Scott Crawford – (509) 954-4750, PIO Bill Clifford – (509) 928-1700

What: The Spokane County Combined Communications Center and Spokane County Fire Departments are proud to announce the arrival of the PulsePoint smartphone App in Spokane County.

When: Friday, February 14, 2014 from 10:00 AM to Noon

Where: Spokane Fire Department Field House, 1618 N. Rebecca Spokane, WA 99212

Now your smartphone can help you save a life. A free smartphone App called PulsePoint will soon be available in Spokane County. PulsePoint enables subscribers who are CPR trained to be alerted to a sudden cardiac arrest at the same time emergency responders are notified. Registered users will be notified when a sudden cardiac arrest has occurred in a public place within their vicinity. PulsePoint will give the citizen responder mapping directions, notify them of any automatic external defibrillators (AEDs) in the area, and provide radio traffic of the emergency responders. Early CPR is the key if a sudden cardiac arrest victim is to survive. When a person goes into sudden cardiac arrest, their heart, brain, and other vital organs no longer receive oxygen. Researchers have found that without early CPR within the first 3 to 5 minutes, a sudden cardiac arrest victim’s chances of survival are dramatically reduced. The free PulsePoint app can be found in the Apple App Store or on Google Play.

You only need to be willing to do “Hands-Only” CPR. According to the American Heart Association, Hands-Only CPR has been shown to be as effective as conventional CPR in the first minutes of sudden cardiac arrest. Subscribers can also view active fire and emergency medical incidents and monitor emergency radio traffic.

Activities:

Welcome and introductions: Bobby Williams – Spokane Fire Chief

PulsePoint Origins and History: Bryan Collins – Spokane Valley Fire Chief

PulsePoint – Enhancing the chain of survival: Michael Metcalf, M.D. – EMS Council

Spokane County Combined Communications Center role in PulsePoint activations: Brian Schaeffer – Spokane Fire Assistant Chief

A personal story of survival: Survivor Speaker – Sudden Cardiac Arrest Foundation

On screen walkthrough of finding, downloading, installing, and configuring the app: Brian Schaeffer – Spokane Fire Assistant Chief

  • Find the app on the Apple App Store and Google Play.
  • Install the app.
  • Choose agency and alert options.
  • Learn about other features.

PulsePoint demonstration: With sudden cardiac arrest victim, PulsePoint activation, Good Samaritan response, AED acquisition, arrival of SVFD Paramedics and AMR, demonstration of Pit Crew CPR.

Closing Remarks: Bobby Williams – Spokane Fire Chief

Additionally there will be:

Knowledge experts on site to show event participants PulsePoint and help them install and configure the app on their phones and other devices.
Handouts discussing Early Activation, Early CPR, Early Defibrillation with the AED, Rapid Transport, Emergency Room and Hospital Care.
Heart healthy snacks and drinks for attendees.

Websites:

Home


http://www.spokanevalleyfire.com/
https://www.facebook.com/spokanefire

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November 23, 2013 | by

Taking pulse of CPR

Clark County unveils smartphone app that can help save lives of cardiac arrest victims

Troy-Wayrynen_TheColumbian_11222013_300pxApproximately 360 to 370 people go into cardiac arrest annually in Clark County, and an average of 17 percent survive, Dr. Lynn Wittwer said Friday.

Wittwer, the county’s emergency medical services program director, said he was defining “survive” as patients who leave the hospital in good neurological condition.

While a 17 percent survival rate ranks higher than many places in the United States, Wittwer would like to increase the survival rate to 30 percent.

And a tool he believes will help was unveiled Friday at the Clark County Public Service Center: PulsePoint, a free smartphone app that alerts CPR-trained users to a cardiac arrest in public.

The Vancouver Fire Department has been working about two years to get the app activated here, ever since Chief Joe Molina heard about it in California. A $25,000 grant paid for the behind-the-scenes work that Clark Regional Emergency Services Agency had to do in order for the app to work countywide. When a call about a cardiac arrest goes to 911, users of PulsePoint who are within 400 yards of the call will be alerted.

Chief Nick Swinhart of the Camas-Washougal Fire Department demonstrated the app Friday.

Now that Vancouver police and sheriff’s patrol cars are equipped with automated external defibrillators, the PulsePoint app has the next greatest potential to increase survival rates for cardiac arrest victims, Swinhart said. Emergency responders are hoping residents who know CPR will download the app, greatly increasing the chance that if someone suffers cardiac arrest in public there will be someone able to respond within a few minutes.

After downloading the app, the user clicks “Clark County” from a list of agencies. Then, under settings, her or she selects “CPR” from call types.

The user can listen to emergency radio traffic if alerted to a nearby cardiac arrest call. A map will show the patient’s exact location.

Doug Smith-Lee, EMS manager for CRESA, reiterated the app only alerts people to calls made from nearby public locations.

Read the full article by Stephanie Rice at The Columbian. Photo by Roy Wayrynen.

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April 4, 2013 | by

Nurse uses lifesaving app to find, try to help man in cardiac arrest

Heather Rom (Portland Tribune)Heather Roms was inside her car near Pediatric Dental when she saw and heard the alert on her phone that someone nearby was having a cardiac emergency. The app gave her the address and location, and Roms quickly drove to Shari’s Restaurant, where a man was having a cardiac emergency.

A labor and delivery nurse who’s accustomed to using the most modern technology to save newborns in jeopardy relied on just her own skills to try and save a man’s life last week.

Heather Roms, 39, of West Linn, was just leaving her daughter’s dentist appointment about 9 a.m. March 27 on Southwest Town Center Loop in Wilsonville when she received an alert on her smartphone that someone nearby was having a cardiac emergency.

It was the first time she had seen the alert on her phone, and she guessed she must be pretty close to where it was taking place.

At first, the PulsePoint application showed only the address of the location where the emergency was happening. Those who subscribe to the app receive notification of the emergency at the same time as first responders.

In this instance, first responders were paramedics from Tualatin Valley Fire & Rescue and AMR ambulance.

At first, Roms wondered whether she should respond, not knowing how instantaneously she received the alert.

Read the full article by Michelle Te at the Portland Tribune.

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