June 6, 2013 | by

Pulse3 Foundation expanding the PulsePoint smartphone app in Michigan

logo-pulse3_foundationSAGINAW, MI — Heart disease is taking a toll on the Great Lakes Bay Region, and the Michigan CardioVascular Institute Foundation is changing to take it on.

The foundation is changing its name to Pulse3 Foundation, said President and Chief Executive Officer Diane Fong. The private foundation will become a public charity, Fong said, and add five members to its board of directors from Saginaw, Bay and Midland counties.

“Heart disease is bigger than one organization,” she said. “Our goals, passion and commitment remains unchanged.”

The death rate from heart disease is higher in Michigan and the region than the national average.

Pulse3’s vision of a community free of heart disease remains strong with community-based, widespread, regional support, Fong said.

The foundation’s programs include the Run for Your Heart Fitness and Wellness Program, Run for Your Heart Community Races, Shocks & Saves alert system for cardiopulmonary resuscitation and automated external defibrillator emergencies, deployment of AED units in the community, CPR/ AED training, community education programs, college scholarships and continuing education programs for healthcare professionals.

One example of expanded programming is the Run for Your Heart program, Fong said. The foundation will partner with the Michigan State University Extension’s diabetes prevention program. The first 20 people who sign up will receive a scholarship to Pulse3’s Run for Your Heart program.

Fong said the charity also is expanding the PulsePoint smartphone app to Isabella, Clare and Gratiot counties. The app sends alerts to people trained in CPR when someone in public collapses from cardiac arrest.

Read the full post by The Saginaw News reporter Lindsay Knake on MLive.

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March 10, 2013 | by

Can a new smartphone application being piloted in Michigan save lives?

Blue Cross Blue ShieldFor residents of Saginaw County, the odds of surviving sudden cardiac arrest are starting to get a lot better.

An initiative spearheaded by the Michigan CardioVascular Institute Foundation and Mobile Medical Response has made Saginaw County the pilot for a smartphone application called PulsePoint, the only county in Michigan involved in testing the technology. In fact, this is only the 12th implementation of the application in the country, and the first in the Midwest. The initiative was introduced during MCVI’s Shocks and Saves charity hockey game on Feb. 2, an event sponsored by BCBSM.

The premise behind the app is simple. People trained in basic CPR are encouraged to download the PulsePoint app. When someone goes into cardiac arrest, people who are trained and who are currently near the victim are messaged through the app so that CPR can be administered until the ambulance arrives.

“During cardiac arrest, seconds really do matter. Immediate chest compressions can triple the chances of survival. Waiting for the ambulance is not the answer — it takes a community to combat sudden cardiac arrest,” says Lynn M. Schutter, director of community relations/strategic planning for MMR.

Read the full article by David Lingholm at MI Blues Perspectives.

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February 2, 2013 | by

Saginaw to launch PulsePoint smartphone app, alert bystanders to assist with CPR

MCVI Foundation LogoSAGINAW, MI — It’s going to be easier to save a life in Saginaw.

And yes, there is an app for that.

The smart phone application is PulsePoint, and the Michigan CardioVascular Institute Foundation and Mobile Medical Response are launching it at the sixth annual MCVI Foundation Shocks & Saves charity hockey game, at 4:30 p.m. Feb. 2, prior to the Saginaw Spirit game.

“We’re trying to increase bystander care while ambulance is on the way and reduce the number of people who die from cardiac arrest,” said MCVI Foundation Executive Director Diane Fong.

The free phone application is available for download from the Apple store and Google Play for Android phones.

If someone is out shopping and collapses from cardiac arrest the PulsePoint app would sent out an alert to trained CPR responders who are in the area as soon as the ambulance is dispatched, Fong said.

Cardiac arrest kills about 1,000 people per day across the country. There is a survival rate of about 8 percent, but a victim who receives immediate CPR sees their survival rates triple.

Of people who go into cardiac arrest in public places, 32 percent receive from bystanders, Fong said.

PulsePoint only shows cardiac arrests in public places, she said. The app also would show the location nearby AEDs.

So far, Fong said, the app will show 200 known AEDs in the county, and she encourages people to contact her to add locations of more of the devices.

“It stands to reason that if we can provide more immediate CPR and more immediate defibrillation, see those numbers decrease,” Fong said.

Read the full article by Lindsay Knake, at Michigan Live.

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