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April 23, 2014 | by

Cellphone app brings quick aid to cardiac victims in need of CPR

Orange County RegisterLocal fire departments have introduced a cellphone app that links citizens who know CPR with victims experiencing sudden cardiac arrest, a tool authorities hope will bring quicker aid to victims when time is short.

The Metro Cities Fire Authority on Wednesday announced the local trial launch of PulsePoint, a “potentially lifesaving” mobile smartphone application that alerts users when someone nearby is in need of CPR and gives them directions to that person.

The system, which will be the first of its kind in Orange County, will be available for users of both Apple and Android smartphones in Anaheim, Brea, Fountain Valley, Fullerton, Garden Grove, Huntington Beach, Newport Beach and Orange.

Authorities say PulsePoint is tied in to a computer system used by MetroNet, the fire dispatch service used by the cities’ fire departments.

When paramedics are dispatched, PulsePoint notifies trained CPR users who have signed up for the app and who are within a quarter-mile of the person in need of emergency intervention.

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The app then sends the user a map to the location of the person in need of CPR, the location of the nearest automated external defibrillator and a link to CPR instructions.

“Every second counts, and this goes hand-in-hand with our effort to save as many lives as possible,” Garden Grove Fire Chief David Barlag said in a written statement.

According to the American Heart Association, effective CPR by a bystander during a sudden cardiac arrest can double or triple someone’s chances of surviving.

“Your lifesaver could be in the next aisle of a retail store or perhaps the same restaurant,” Anaheim Fire Chief Randy Bruegman said in a statement. “When alerted through PulsePoint, citizen CPR can be administered almost immediately.”

View the full story by Sean Emery at the Orange County Register.

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January 17, 2014 | by

University Hospitals phone app to help First Responders

Chagrin Valley Dispatch Nick DiCiccoCLEVELAND — Firefighters, police and EMS want you to get involved.

University Hospitals is among the first in Ohio to be equipping the police and fire crews with a new smart phone app that enlists the public as part of the front-line responders when someone nearby is suffering from a heart attack.

University Hospitals has made the cities of South Russell, Chagrin Falls, Chagrin Falls Township, Bentleyville, Gates Mills, Hunting Valley, Moreland Hills, Orange, Woodmere and Highland Hills the first group to institute the PulsePoint notification system.

The new Chagrin Valley Dispatch Center, based out of UH Bedford Medical Center, is at the center of the new technological advancement as the system has now been integrated into the 9-1-1 protocols.

The set of 10 cities are under UH ambulance protocols as the health system purchased the licensing agreement from the company with the intent of enrolling all of the fire department and EMS crews under its jurisdiction with the programming.

Read the full article by Monica Robins at WKYC.

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January 17, 2014 | by

App Sends Out Alert When Someone Needs CPR

BEDFORD, Ohio– No doubt, CPR and minutes matter when someone is having a heart attack. There is new technology that sends out an alert that someone is in cardiac arrest. It means anyone can be a lifesaver if they have a smartphone.

The new Chagrin Valley Dispatch Center, now in the basement of Bedford Medical Center, opened this week. It serves ten communities.

PulsePoint is connected to the 911 calls that come in. It is a new app for smartphones that sends out an alert that someone is in cardiac arrest.

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Lt. Nick DiCicco with the Orange Police Dept. oversees the dispatch center. He said the PulsePoint app works within a quarter-mile radius of the person’s phone. “It automatically sends the call information up to the PulsePoint servers and the PulsePoint servers then deploy it out to anybody who has downloaded the app,” Lt. DiCicco explained.

It’s for anyone who is CPR-certified and willing to try to save a life before EMS arrives.

Dan Ellenberger, University Hospitals Director of EMS Training and Disaster Preparedness, said in cardiac emergency situations it’s about getting hands on the chest. “We trained 14,000 people last year in CPR. So, there are 14,000 responders out there that can actually save a life if they knew that someone was having a cardiac arrest,” Ellenberger added.

You don’t have to live in the Chagrin Valley area to download the PulsePoint app on your phone. “You could be visiting Orange Place in Orange Village and having dinner at the Bahama Breeze and if we are responding to that area and someone is in cardiac arrest — you have the app; you will be alerted,” Lt. DiCicco said.

When PulsePoint sends out the alert, it will also show where to find the nearest defibrillator for that call. Lt. DiCicco says PulsePoint has been used in the Columbus area this past year and is credited with saving about a dozen lives. “When an ambulance gets called out it can be between a 4-6 minutes response time and if we can get a lay person there within 1 to 2 minutes to start CPR and maybe do a defibrillation — it will absolutely save a life,” Lt. DiCicco added.

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January 15, 2014 | by

University Hospitals, East Side suburbs use PulsePoint app to enlist CPR-trained people to help first responders

The PulsePoint app lets any CPR-trained user know when there is an emergency within a quarter mile, and also provides the location of the nearest defibrillator. The app is coordinated with emergency dispatch centers and aims to get CPR to victims of cardiac arrest as quickly as possible, saving valuable minutes in an emergency.

CVD App ImageCLEVELAND, Ohio– If someone collapses in a public place and needs CPR, University Hospitals and an East Side 9-1-1 dispatch center are now using an app called PulsePoint to let ordinary citizens know about it, hoping that people with CPR training who are close at hand will step in until emergency workers arrive.

PulsePoint is a free app launched in 2009 after San Ramon Valley Fire Chief Richard Price watched his own fire department’s trucks arrive to a medical emergency at a store next to the deli where he was eating lunch. A man at the store had collapsed and needed CPR, but because it was a medical emergency, Price didn’t know about it.

“If it had been a big fire, they would have called me,” Price said. “But these calls happen all the time. Had I known, I probably could have made a difference, because I had a defibrillator in my car.” Fortunately, the man survived.

Price worked with engineering students at Northern Kentucky University to develop the app, and 500 cities in 16 states are now using it.

The PulsePoint system is incorporated into the 9-1-1 protocol: in an emergency in which a person suffers a sudden cardiac arrest in a public place, app users within a quarter-mile will receive a notification of the event and also see where the nearest automated external defibrillator (AED) is located. An AED is a portable device that checks the heart rhythm and can deliver an electric shock to restore a normal rhythm if necessary.

Daniel Ellenberger, director of the EMS training & Disaster Preparedness Institute at UH, brought the technology to Northeast Ohio after seeing it demonstrated at a conference last year. Columbus-area emergency dispatchers began using the notification system over the summer.

“I thought this would be a great fit for us with our mission,” Ellenberger said. “Before anyone is going to survive an out-of-hospital cardiac arrest, they have to have great CPR. We have to train people, but part of that is being notified that they’re needed.”

Read the full article by Brie Zeltner at The Plain Dealer.

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