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September 6, 2014 | by

How do I help bring PulsePoint to my community?

PulsePoint is typically marketed to Fire and EMS agencies. If you are with a public safety agency we are well equipped to lead you through the process. We have partnered with Physio-Control to discuss and implement PulsePoint throughout the United States and around the world. You can reach out to your local rep or give Physio-Control a call at (800) 442-1142. You can also send them an inquiry at pulsepoint@physio-control.com.

With the amount national attention PulsePoint has received recently we are fielding many inquiries from individuals interested in having PulsePoint provided in their community. While it is the mission of our foundation to provide seamless PulsePoint coverage across the globe, this will obviously take time. PulsePoint must be integrated into the local emergency call center so that we can be aware of cardiac arrests in real time.

Although we are working hard to make public safety agencies aware of PulsePoint, you can definitely help by expressing interest to your local fire chief, EMS official, and elected officials such as your mayor and council members. A simple note, phone call or public meeting comment would ensure that they are aware of PulsePoint. Expressing your personal willingness to participate in improving local cardiac arrest survival rates through CPR and AED use would likely be well received and go a long way to help move things up in priority. We have found that City Hall does listen and is quite willing to bring PulsePoint to the community. Here is a brochure you can share with them.

We are adding PulsePoint-connected communities on an almost daily basis and look forward to adding your community in the very near future.

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March 28, 2013 | by

Saving Lives with an App

Mobile app notifies registrants when CPR is needed

Chief PriceRichard Price had an idea that grew into a smartphone application, and then a foundation, that may very well change the way EMS responds to cardiac arrest calls. The idea will certainly save lives, and it all started at a deli over a pastrami and rye.

Birth of an App
“I was out to lunch and was sitting in a deli with a few other people when I heard sirens in the distance,” Price says. “The sirens got louder, and then they pulled up right in front of the deli where I was eating.”

It turned out that the EMS crews were responding to a cardiac arrest call in the building next door. “If I had known, I could have made a difference. I know CPR and I have an AED in my car,” Price says. The event made him think about his smartphone and how the device knew his location and could tell someone else. “The idea came that we could possibly notify someone who was nearby an event using his or her phone,” he says.

That was three years ago, and the result of that event, and Price’s subsequent idea, has been the creation of PulsePoint, which was launched in 2012. Though the technology is sophisticated, taking hundreds of hours and many people to bring the idea to fruition, the actual PulsePoint app is simple. Users who are trained in CPR and have registered with the system as willing to assist in an emergency cardiac arrest situation will be notified on their smartphone if someone nearby is having a cardiac arrest.

Read the full article by Cynthia Kincaid on JEMS.

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June 5, 2012 | by

“Heart of Gold” Award Presented to Chief Price

After receiving the 2012 “Heart of Gold” award from Jill DiGiacomo, Executive Director for the American Heart Association, Fire Chief and PulsePoint President Richard Price delivered these comments on Saturday, June 2, 2012 at the Wente Vineyards Gala in Livermore, California.

Chief Price addresses guests at AHA Heart of Gold Ball

Chief Price addresses guests at the Heart of Gold Ball

“I would like to express my sincere appreciation to the American Heart Association Board of Directors and to the Heart of Gold Nominating Committee for selecting me for this honor tonight.

I would also like to congratulate Dr. Khan, my co-honoree this evening, for his well-deserved recognition.

I would like to thank my wonderful wife Lisa, who runs our household everyday, so that I can be the community’s 24/7 Fire Chief, while still squeezing in a little foundation work each evening – and occasional weekend.

My beautiful 9-year old daughter Halle is here tonight. At $500 a plate, I told her she would probably be the only kid here, and that looks to be true. I’m certain that this is the first time she has been served Filet Mignon and a glass Cabernet Sauvignon. Hang in there little girl, we’re almost done. And I’m surrounded tonight with more of my family and friends including my parents, Richard and Sallie Price.

1,000 Americans die every day from Sudden Cardiac Arrest, making it the leading cause of death in the U.S. But many of these deaths could be prevented if CPR was initiated, and an AED was deployed, in the first few minutes after an arrest. Over the past 50 years, 300M people have been trained in CPR, yet today, CPR is only performed in about 25% of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest cases. And publicly available AED’s, the ones you see in airports, schools and other places of assembly, are retrieved and used only 1% or 2% of the time when available – primarily because lay rescuers don’t think about them, and don’t know where to find them.

Without intervention, a cardiac arrest victim has only about 10 minutes to live. But as we have heard tonight CPR suspends time, essentially stopping that 10-minute clock, and sustains life until more advanced care can arrive. So after 10 minutes you have no chance of survival; and brain damage begins several minutes before that. To put that into context consider the paramedic response time, right now, to this facility is about eight minutes. Not much room for error. This excruciatingly short window of opportunity is exactly why most people do not survive a sudden cardiac arrest. Today, more than ever, citizens helping citizens is the only way for the Chain of Survival to truly work. Local government response times are not improving in this economy – if anything they are getting worse.

Instead of relying on fate to place a CPR-trained citizen in the exact location needed at the exact time needed, the PulsePoint app is used to dispatch nearby CPR-trained citizens simultaneously with the dispatch of local paramedics, so CPR can begin immediately. The app also directs these citizens, with a live map, to the nearest AED.

This video tribute produced by Heart.org was played before Chief Price was invited to the stage.

In the Greater Bay Area we have some of the finest cardiac care facilities in the world. But if patients arrive at these hospitals already dead, our best doctors and our latest procedures have no opportunity to make any difference at all. So therein lies the promise of the PulsePoint App – to deliver patients that are still alive, so they can benefit from all the innovation and interventions that are available to cardiac patients today.

The PulsePoint Foundation has a talented and diverse board of directors drawn from public safety, tech, medicine and finance. It includes Dave Duffield from Workday who’s engineering team built the enterprise-class PulsePoint service for the foundation; Dr. Ben Bobrow, Medical Director for the State of Arizona who is also the Chair of the American Heart Association Basic Life Support Subcommittee; and Don Ledoux, with Summit Financial, who is here tonight representing the PulsePoint board.

The mission of the foundation is to extend the reach of the app around the globe and to do that at no cost to the implementing fire or EMS agency. If you would like to join us in this mission please reach out to me. We need your help.

Events like this are a tremendous amount of work and require the combined efforts of many people, including many volunteers. This is a very special night for my family and I, and we thank everyone that had a hand in bringing us together for this important cause. I believe the PulsePoint app represents a revolutionary step forward in cardiac arrest survival and I’m thrilled to be here tonight sharing that vision with an audience that also holds a very strong commitment to that goal.

Thank you.”

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May 30, 2012 | by

Enabling Citizen Heroes

This article is reprinted with permission from EMS Insider

Add a mobile app to your CPR program

EMS InsiderWhen it comes to cardiac arrests, a few well-known facts exist: Time is muscle; the window of opportunity to save a patient whose heart has stopped is excruciatingly small; and getting responders who know CPR to the patient as soon as possible provides the best chance for survival. The third fact was brought home to San Ramon Valley (Calif.) Fire Protection District (SRVFPD) Fire Chief Richard Price during lunch one day. While he was eating at a local deli, he heard sirens in the distance. Then he watched as the engine eventually stopped in front of the restaurant. Because he does not receive pages for medical emergencies, he was unaware that someone had collapsed in cardiac arrest just next door. Had he known, he could have been there in seconds to start CPR and use the AED in his vehicle before the crews arrived. This incident gave Price an idea. With the current cell phone technology and GPS, there must be a way to alert staff who may be in the area of a cardiac arrest, he thought. “It was very conceptual at that time. The idea grew out of that,” Price says. The “idea” evolved into a CPR mobile app for the iPhone and Android, that eventually became known as PulsePoint. Price expanded on his original idea to include citizens trained in CPR, who have indicated they’re willing to assist in case of an emergency. The app uses the GPS feature on the phone to locate citizens who have signed up for the program and are in the vicinity of a cardiac arrest patient. Notifications are sent only if the victim is in a public place and only to potential rescuers within walking distance of the emergency. The application also directs rescuers to the exact location of the closest AED. “We crowd source good Samaritans,” Price says. Price knew he needed help to develop the mobile app, so the district partnered with interns from the College of Informatics at Northern Kentucky University. While they worked out the technical details, Price attended to other issues. Initially, some concern was expressed about sending too many rescuers to what can often be a chaotic scene. However, Price says that this seldom happens. “We can always make the notification circle smaller, if we get to that problem,” he says. Even in the limited cases where extra rescuers respond, it hasn’t been an issue, Price says. On one occasion, a person suffered a cardiac arrest at a coffee shop and a large number of rescuers responded. But instead of causing confusion or getting in the way, they did a good job assigning tasks, and those who weren’t directly involved in the rescue attempt helped by clapping to the beat of the chest compressions.

Privacy issues
Price notes that the chain of survival depends on training people in CPR and sending them out into their communities to respond when needed. “The app doesn’t really change that very much. It just takes some of the fate out of it,” he says. Still, certain privacy precautions had to be considered. To protect the rescuer’s information, the app doesn’t know the identity of the responders—it simply locates a “device” by accessing the unique identification number, which is required for the PulsePoint server to locate and send alert messages to a specific device. Price says the app doesn’t access any other information on the responder’s device. “No personal information is ever collected or retained,” he says. Because the activation occurs within an exceptionally limited radius—within walking distance—the app only alerts people to emergencies in their immediate vicinity. “It makes you more aware of what’s happening nearby you,” he says. He says they were also careful to consider possible Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) violations when designing the app. No patient information is ever broadcast or known by PulsePoint. Because PulsePoint doesn’t know who responded, the citizen rescuers are not informed of outcomes. “Occasionally circumstances allow the citizen rescuers to come together with survivors, but it’s a careful, respectful process,” Price says. The issue only becomes problematic if there’s an infectious disease concern.

Where’s the AED?
The biggest hurdle for a seamless citizen CPR response is locating public AEDs. Price says that the district has done a good job of promoting the use of AEDs, but locating them and ensuring they’re properly maintained has been a challenge. “When you’re dispatching people to them, the standard is higher,” he says. “You need to know one is there.” Despite a vigorous awareness program in San Ramon Valley, the use rates of AEDs among citizens are low. Price believes the area for which emergency responders should commit additional resources. “AEDs need to rise to the importance of fire extinguishers,” he says. Some communities are starting to include AED location information in their computer-aided design (CAD) system so dispatchers can provide not only CPR instructions, but also the location of a nearby AED.

PulsePoint foundation
Once the district developed the app, they wanted to share it—and not just with their neighbors. “We want to be around the globe,” Price says. To do so, they created the PulsePoint Foundation, a 501(c)3 nonprofit organization that provides and supports the app free of charge. Supporting services are also provided at no charge to public safety agencies that offer the CPR app in their community. However, charges from the CAD system vendor may occur, which interface with the app. The foundation is working with the CAD vendors to moderate these costs. Currently, the PulsePoint Foundation is working with more than 150 organizations in the deployment of the app.

Community outreach
To launch a successful CPR mobile app program, community outreach is critical. Price recommends a multi-pronged marketing program to encourage citizen awareness and ongoing involvement. The district started with a public service announcement in movie theaters and other venues to raise awareness of both the app and the importance of citizen CPR. SRVFPD used university interns to help develop the PSA. “It was a low-cost way to create tremendous
value,” Price says. The district spent very little public money, and the students received real-world experience. “It gave meaning to their studies,” Price says. “It’s a win-win.” The district continues to promote CPR at all community events, and is working to provide CPR training to all seventh graders in the local school district. It also established a program to manage the maintenance of the approximately 200 public AEDs in the community. “We know where every single one is and have hands on them every six months,” Price says.

Upgrades added
A number of upgrades have been added to the program since the original application launched. A streaming radio function allows citizens to listen to emergency calls anywhere in the world. Most recently, a Twitter feature began broadcasting PulsePoint app CPR activations in real time. The tweet includes the time of activation, the general location and the number of citizen rescuers notified. The goal is to increase awareness of the app and the role it plays in saving lives. The Twitter feed can be found at @1000livesaday, a reference to the number of people who die daily in the U.S. from sudden cardiac arrest. Price says the number of activations is around one per day. On average, 3-4 citizens respond per incident. “I’ve seen as many as 22,” he says. The next release of the app will include a survey tool sent one hour after app users were notified of a need for CPR. The goal is to collect data on the responses to the notifications and create a clearer picture of what happens during the response before the professionals arrive. It will attempt to find out whether a person responded to the notification and if not, why. If they did respond, they’ll be asked whether they performed CPR, if an AED was available, and if so, whether it was used. The optional survey will continue to allow the citizen responder to remain anonymous, if desired. Price says the survey is being developed by Bentley J. Bobrow, MD, medical director of the Bureau of Emergency Services Arizona Department of Health Services; and Steven C. Brooks, MD, MHSc FRCPC, emergency physician and scientist at Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre and assistant professor at the University of Toronto.

Summary
Because CPR has been around for 50 years, Price says sometimes it can be hard to find something exciting about it. But the process of developing the app and sharing it with others has been just that. “We were right at the time in history when it was all possible. Six months earlier, and it would not have been possible,” he says. Through this process, SRVFPD learned something about human beings that they probably already knew—people really want to help others. “This is a way, at no cost, you can make a significant difference in [out-of-hospital cardiac arrest] survivability,” Price says. “Think about the force multiplier—it’s a huge deal.” However, he warns, the app isn’t a panacea. “It works best in systems that are already good,” he says. That means good citizen CPR programs, an active AED strategy and a strong activation policy for ST-elevation myocardial infarction patients. “It ties a lot of things together and makes good systems pay off bigger,” he says. Although good work can often go unrewarded, this isn’t the case for Price. In February, the Danville Area Chamber of Commerce and the San Ramon Valley Times named Price “Citizen of the Year” for his innovative efforts to protect the lives of the citizens in his jurisdiction and beyond.

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March 13, 2012 | by

EMS: There’s an App For That!

Firehouse MagazineFrom Page 42 of Firehouse Magazine this month (March, 2012).

One of the most profound uses of an app I have seen comes from the San Ramon Valley Fire Protection District in San Ramon, CA. In January 2011, the district released an app for the iPhone and other phones that lets any citizen provide life-saving assistance to victims of sudden cardiac arrest. A citizen who is trained in CPR and who has downloaded the app is sent a notification that a cardiac arrest is occurring in the community so that citizen can provide CPR until the fire department arrives. If the cardiac arrest is in a public place, a map shows the location of the closest automated external defibrillator (AED) and where it can be found in the building, such as “mounted on wall on second floor outside main gym entrance.” A setting on that app lets you choose notifications, including fires, and a map shows you exactly where emergencies are occurring. Through its foundation, the district makes the app free to other fire departments to install in their communities.

Read the rest of this article by Chief Gary Ludwig on Firehouse.com.

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February 7, 2012 | by

Who’da Thought? An iPhone App That Saves Lives

An iPhone app, PulsePoint, marshals a community resource in its CPR (cardiopulmonary resuscitation)-trained citizens to respond to victims of sudden cardiac arrest. Who would have thought of that? Chief Richard Price of the San Ramon Valley, Calif., Fire Dept., that’s who.

The civic-minded Fire Chief’s location-aware app is free and may only come at a cost if it is not deployed. And that cost may be lives lost due to cardiac arrest.

Read the rest of this post on the LTN for Products blog at Law Technology News.

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January 18, 2012 | by

Citizen Superheroes Now Equipped with Android Devices

Lifesaving app now available in the Android Market

Android Screen ImagePLEASANTON, CA – The PulsePoint Foundation is proud to announce the release of the Android version of its life‐saving mobile app that crowd‐sources Good Samaritans to events where the potential need for bystander CPR is high. The iPhone version of the app was released in January 2011 by the San Ramon Valley Fire Protection District. The PulsePoint Foundation is the new nonprofit organization taking the reins from the Fire District to guide, enhance and expand the reach of the app worldwide.

“We are very pleased to be extending the reach of the application to Android devices and users,” said Richard Price, President of the PulsePoint Foundation and Fire Chief for the San Ramon Valley Fire Protection District. “With nearly 1,000 deaths a day directly attributed to Sudden Cardiac Arrest, the time for this app is now.”

The foundation turned to Workday, Inc. (www.workday.com) to encourage its employees to volunteer to design and build the Android version along with a multijurisdictional, multi‐client infrastructure that could handle the worldwide interest in the app. The app was developed solely by volunteers from Workday’s development team. “Workday believes strongly in the mission of the foundation and is pleased that several of its employees donated their own time to lend a hand in this important initiative to improve the outcomes for victims of Sudden Cardiac Arrest,” said Petros Dermetzis, Vice President of Development at Workday. “We are very proud and appreciative of the Workday employees who raised their hands to help others with this project.”

The PulsePoint app (previously the FireDepartment app) is now available at no cost in the Android Market. Android users can now simply visit the Market and search for “PulsePoint” to download the app, (the PulsePoint App requires the Android operating system of 2.2 or greater). Once the app is loaded into the phone users can volunteer to be notified if someone nearby is in need of CPR by selecting the CPR notification option.

The application has received several international awards including the International Association of Fire Chiefs 2011 Fire Service Award for Excellence, a CTIA-The Wireless Association 2011 VITA Wireless Samaritan Award, a 2011 Computerworld Honors Program Laureate Award for Innovation, an American Heart Association Life Saver Heart Partner Award, and an IADAS Webby Official Honoree award for the Best Use of GPS or Location Technology. The Public Service Announcement designed to promote awareness and adoption of the application also received two Telly Awards.

The foundation is guided by an Advisory Board made up of visionaries in the tech and medical industries, including Dr. Ben Bobrow of the Arizona Department of Health Services, Co‐Founder and Co‐CEO Dave Duffield of Workday, CIO Tim Ferguson of Northern Kentucky University, CEO Tim O’Reilly of O’Reilly Media, and President Jack Parow of the International Association of Fire Chiefs.

PulsePoint is a registered 501(c)(3) non‐profit foundation based in the San Francisco Bay Area whose goal is to make it much easier for citizens who are certified in CPR to use their life saving skills to do just that… save lives! Through the use of modern, location‐aware mobile devices PulsePoint is building applications that work with local Fire Departments, EMS agencies, and Police Departments to improve communications with citizens and empower them to reduce worldwide sudden cardiac arrest deaths.

Note to Editors
For additional web and print resources related to the app including sample screen shots, supporting images and video, please visit the PulsePoint Foundation website at https://www.pulsepoint.org/media-resources.

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