statesman-journal-300x190

November 23, 2016 | by

Off-duty Salem firefighter saves life with app’s help

Fire Captain Greg Sanberg

Fire Captain Greg Sanberg was running errands in Salem this spring when an app on his phone alerted him about a medical emergency at a nearby motel.

This wasn’t a chance Facebook or Twitter post: With the help of the mobile app, the off-duty firefighter was able to locate a woman in cardiac arrest.

Sanberg, 47, performed chest compressions. The woman began to breathe around the time emergency responders arrived, he said.

“It was just as sliver of time when I was that close to that person,” he said.

The app is called PulsePoint. City officials say it has helped boost Salem’s cardiac arrest save rate to 80 percent, one of the highest in the Pacific Northwest.

PulsePoint works by giving users a heads-up when someone nearby is experiencing cardiac arrest. Users can tell the app they are trained in cardiopulmonary resuscitation or CPR.

The app lets users report where they see automated external defibrillators in the community. It lists events like traffic collisions and fire alarms, too.

In October, a little more than 5,000 Salem-area users had signed up with PulsePoint, and city officials are urging more people to use it.

The city says more people are being trained in CPR, including more than 2,700 eight-grade students who also learned how to use defibrillators last year. The city estimates up to 3,000 students are going to be trained similarly this year.

“It’s very important for everyone to have these basic skills in order to save a loved one,” Salem Fire Department Chief Mike Niblock said in a news release, noting that more than half of sudden cardiac arrests in Salem happen inside peoples’ homes.

As far as Sanberg is concerned, the more people on PulsePoint, the more likely it is to save a person’s life.

“We only have 150 people in our fire department,” he said, comparing that to the thousands of app users. And the potential for being an everyday hero doesn’t stop in Salem – the app can be used in cities around the nation, from Seattle to Pittsburgh.

“You could be across the county and save somebody’s life,” Sandberg said.

Source: Jonathan Bach, Statesman Journal

PGFD Logo

October 12, 2016 | by

Prince George’s County Fire/EMS Department Brings Lifesaving Technology to Region via 9-1-1 Integrated Smartphone App

PulsePoint Respond empowers CPR-trained citizens and off-duty professionals to provide critical assistance to cardiac arrest victims

UPPER MARLBORO, MD, October 12, 2016 – Today, the Prince George’s County Fire/Emergency Medical Services (EMS) Department (PGFD) joined the PulsePoint Foundation and CTIA Wireless Foundation to bring life-saving technology to the County via the PulsePoint Respond app. The event was held at the Prince George’s Sports & Learning Complex in Landover. County Executive Rushern Baker was joined by PGFD Fire Chief Marc Bashoor and CTIA Wireless Foundation Executive Director Athena Polydorou to highlight the benefits of this mobile app that alerts CPR-trained citizens of cardiac events in their vicinity so they may administer aid.

The app also notifies users of the closest available Automated External Defibrillator (AED). Early application of bystander CPR and rapid defibrillation from an AED have proven to be crucial in improving a person’s chance of surviving sudden cardiac arrest (SCA). PulsePoint is not limited to emergency responders or those with official CPR certification. It can be used by anyone who has been trained in CPR.

“We are proud to be the first Fire/EMS Department in the NCR to implement PulsePoint,” said Fire Chief Marc Bashoor. “It gives our residents and visitors the ability to know when a cardiac arrest is occurring close by, to respond quickly, and to attempt potentially lifesaving CPR while our paramedics travel to the scene.”

The PulsePoint app also provides users with a display of PGFD’s active and recent incidents County-wide. On average, PGFD responds to 400 daily calls for service; more than 80 percent are for emergency medical services.

“By directly alerting those who are qualified and nearby, maybe in the business next door or on the floor above, PulsePoint is able to put the right people in the right place at the right time,” said Richard Price, President of the California-based 501(c)(3) nonprofit PulsePoint Foundation.

The latest AHA guidelines, published in Circulation, state that such community programs could increase bystander CPR to the roughly 326,000 cardiac arrests that happen outside the hospital each year.

“The project expands PulsePoint coverage to the 900,000 citizens of Prince George’s County over an area of 499 square miles,” said Brian Frankel, Assistant Fire Chief, Prince George’s County Fire/EMS Department. “PulsePoint is a powerful new tool for us to engage with our community to improve cardiac arrest survival rates.”

“By connecting those in critical need with CPR-trained individuals, the PulsePoint app is saving lives across America. We’re proud to be a key sponsor of PulsePoint so that Prince George’s County residents will benefit from this inventive app that leverages Americans’ mobile-first lifestyles,” said Athena Polydorou, Executive Director of CTIA Wireless Foundation.

The free PulsePoint app is available for iPhone and Android and can be downloaded from the iTunes Store and Google Play.

About Prince George’s County Fire/EMS
The Prince George’s County Fire/EMS Department is one of the largest and busiest combination, volunteer and career, Departments in the Country, if not, the world. We responded to a total of over 140,000 calls for service last year. Eighty percent of these incidents are EMS-related.

About the PulsePoint Foundation
PulsePoint is a 501(c)(3) non-profit foundation based in the San Francisco Bay Area. Through the use of location-aware mobile devices, PulsePoint is building applications that work with local public safety agencies to improve communications with citizens, empowering them to help reduce the millions of annual deaths from sudden cardiac arrest (SCA). Deployment of the PulsePoint app can significantly strengthen the “chain of survival” by improving bystander response to cardiac arrest victims and increasing the chance that lifesaving steps will be taken prior to the arrival of emergency medical services (EMS). PulsePoint is built and maintained by volunteer engineers at Workday and distributed by our marketing and implementation partner Physio-Control, Inc. CTIA Wireless Foundation is a key sponsor and advocate of PulsePoint, providing industry and financial support. Learn more at www.pulsepoint.org or join the conversation at Facebook and Twitter. The free app is available for download on iTunes and Google Play.

About CTIA Wireless Foundation
CTIA Wireless Foundation is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit dedicated to developing and supporting initiatives that use wireless technology to enhance American communities. Its innovative programs leverage mobile technology to provide consumer benefits in two key areas: health and safety. The Foundation was formed by CTIA® member companies in 1991. Learn more at www.wirelessfoundation.org.

About Sudden Cardiac Arrest
Although a heart attack can lead to sudden cardiac arrest (SCA), the two are not the same. SCA is when the heart malfunctions and suddenly stops beating unexpectedly, whereas a heart attack is when blood flow to the heart is blocked, but the heart continues to beat. Each year, more than 420,000 out-of-hospital cardiac arrests occur, making it the leading cause of death in the United States. Survival rates nationally for SCA are less than eight percent, but delivery of CPR can sustain life until paramedics arrive by maintaining vital blood flow to the heart and brain. However, only about a third of SCA victims receive bystander CPR. Without CPR, brain damage or death can occur in minutes. The average EMS response time is nine minutes, even in urban settings; after 10 minutes there is little chance of successful resuscitation. The American Heart Association estimates that effective bystander CPR, provided immediately after SCA, can double or triple a person’s chance of survival.

# # #

Contact:
Mark E. Brady, Chief Spokesperson
(240) 508-7930
mebrady@co.pg.md.us
@PGFDPIO

Source: Prince George’s County

Allegheny County

July 7, 2016 | by

Allegheny County, Pittsburgh Announce Launch of Lifesaving Smartphone Application

PITTSBURGH – Allegheny County Executive Rich Fitzgerald, City of Pittsburgh Mayor William Peduto and City of Pittsburgh Councilman Dan Gilman today announced initiatives to improve public safety services and empower residents to take action while awaiting response by EMS professionals. The press event, which also included partners from the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center’s Department of Emergency Medicine, announced the launch of PulsePoint Response, a smartphone application to alert CPR-trained citizens of nearby cardiac arrest incidents and emergencies requiring CPR.

“We know that mere minutes can save peoples’ lives and through this public-private partnership, we have the ability to allow citizens offer that lifesaving help,” said Fitzgerald. “We thank Councilman Gilman for bringing this to us and for the partnership with Mayor Peduto and UPMC. We are also grateful for the work that Allegheny County Emergency Services put in on this project to allow this launch to happen.”

The PulsePoint app works directly with the computer-aided dispatch (CAD) system of the Allegheny County Emergency Services 911 Center. When an incident requiring an AED or CPR is reported to 911, citizen users of the app and trained EMS professionals will simultaneously receive a notification of the emergency, thereby increasing a patient’s chance of survival.

Mayor Peduto and Councilman Gilman also announced the expansion of a CPR training program for residents of the City of Pittsburgh. Data shows that each minute without CPR reduces the chance of survival by 7-10 percent. Bystander intervention in the critical early moments of sudden cardiac arrest can increase blood flow to the brain and heart and according to the American Heart Association, can double or triple an individual’s chance for survival.

“PulsePoint brings together so much of what is great about Pittsburgh, from being a leader in both technology and health care, to being the home residents and public safety personnel who are always there to help one another,” said Peduto.

Councilman Gilman will introduce legislation next week to require the registration of AED devices, an effort that will inform the UPMC Heart Map program and ReLive initiative, as well as provide integration of the information into the 911 Center and PulsePoint application.

“Bringing PulsePoint, an expanded CPR training program, and the AED registry to the Pittsburgh region will empower residents to become Good Samaritans and assist our award-winning EMS professionals to save lives during cardiac arrest incidents,” said Gilman. “I am thrilled to launch PulsePoint, a prime example of the power of technology to save lives.”

Allegheny County dispatches for 115 of the 130 municipalities, although all 911 calls come into the Allegheny County 911 Center. This app, and the shared data, will be available to all 42 EMS agencies in the county. Our leadership will begin reaching out in the near future to make those connections through the county’s EMS Council, the Local Emergency Planning Council (LEPC) and other organizations.

Allegheny County Emergency Services will also be working with volunteer and paid fire agencies throughout the county to share information on the app and resources available. Additionally, the department will be assisting in reaching out to all public safety entities within Allegheny County (police, fire, EMS, hospital staff, colleges and universities) to share the use and benefits of PulsePoint. All outreach will begin in the next few months, but interested entities can also contact Emergency Services directly at 412-473-1000.

Both the PulsePoint Respond and PulsePoint AED apps are now available for iPhone and Android and can be downloaded from the iTunes Store and Google Play.

# # #

Office of the County Executive
101 Courthouse • 436 Grant Street • Pittsburgh, PA 15219
Phone (412) 350-6500 • Fax (412) 350-6512
www.alleghenycounty.us • executive@alleghenycounty.us

Office of the Mayor
512 City-County Building • 414 Grant Street • Pittsburgh, PA 15219
Phone (412) 255-2626 • Fax (412) 255-2687
www.PittsburghPA.gov

Office of Pittsburgh City Council District 8
510 City-County Building • 414 Grant Street • Pittsburgh, PA 15219
Phone (412) 255-2133 • Fax (412) 255-0738
www.PittsburghPA.gov/District8

SOURCE: Allegheny County (Press Release)

Medic One Seattle FD

June 1, 2016 | by

Medic One Foundation and Seattle Fire Urge Citizens to Download New Life-Saving Mobile App

Goal is to recruit 15,000 PulsePoint Citizen Responders

SEATTLE (June 1, 2016) – Medic One Foundation and the Seattle Fire Department (SFD) announced today the launch of PulsePoint, a free life-saving mobile app. The Seattle Fire Department is the first agency to launch PulsePoint in King County and hopes to recruit 15,000 PulsePoint citizen responders.

PulsePoint is like an AMBER alert for sudden cardiac arrest victims. It uses location-based technology to alert citizens to a sudden cardiac arrest in their immediate vicinity so that they can start CPR in the critical life-saving minutes before first responders arrive.

With funding from the Employees Community Fund of Boeing, the Medic One Foundation is working with local fire departments in King and Snohomish counties to bring PulsePoint to additional communities throughout the region.

PulsePoint’s launch was officially announced at Seattle’s historic Fire Station #10 by Seattle Fire Chief Harold Scoggins and Mayor Ed Murray. Sharing in the PulsePoint app announcement and highlighting the impact it will have on saving lives were Jan Sprake, Medic One Foundation executive director, Dr. Michael Sayre, SFD medical director, Heather Kelley, a sudden cardiac arrest survivor, and Kelsey Camp, 2016 President of the Employees Community Fund of Boeing.

“People living and working in Seattle have access to emergency life-saving care that is second to none in the world, thanks to our Medic One system,” said Mayor Ed Murray.  “With PulsePoint, we can boost our sudden cardiac arrest survival rate even higher.”

“When sudden cardiac arrest strikes, each minute without CPR reduces the chance of survival by 7-10 percent, so early bystander CPR and rapid defibrillation from an AED is crucial,” said Seattle Fire Chief Harold Scoggins. “I am proud to join with the Medic One Foundation, the Employees Community Fund of Boeing and first responders everywhere to urge all citizens to learn CPR, download PulsePoint and help us save lives. You are a critical link in the chain of survival for sudden cardiac arrest victims.”

The free PulsePoint app is available for iPhone and Android and can be downloaded from the iTunes Store and Google Play. For more information about PulsePoint and CPR training, visit www.mediconefoundation.org.

About the Medic One Foundation
The Medic One Foundation’s mission is to save lives by improving pre-hospital emergency care. We fund extraordinary training for our region’s paramedics and innovative research to develop new methods of pre-hospital emergency care that improve survival rates and patient outcomes. The Medic One Foundation is a major reason why Seattle and King County have a survival rate for sudden cardiac arrest that is among the highest in the world. For more information, or to get involved, go to www.mediconefoundation.org.

About the Seattle Fire Department
The Seattle Fire Department provides emergency medical care and fire suppression services to the community of Seattle through 33 fire stations strategically placed throughout the city. In 2015, SFD responded to 92,852 fire and medical emergencies. The department’s mission is to minimize the loss of life and property resulting from fires, medical emergencies and other disasters. Additional information about the Seattle Fire Department can be found at http://www.seattle.gov/fire.

About the Employees Community Fund of Boeing
The Employees Community Fund of Boeing Puget Sound, known as ECF, is an employee-owned and managed charitable giving program. Since 1951, generous Boeing employees have contributed over $600,000,000 to Puget Sound nonprofits. ECF grants enable Health & Human Service agencies to purchase much-needed equipment, renovate their facilities and build new construction that directly benefit their clients. ECF also funds local United Ways that invest ECF dollars to support hundreds of nonprofit programs. The Employees Community Fund has funded $436,750 via two major grants to Medic One Foundation.

# # #

Contact:
Lee Keller
(206) 799-3805
lee@thekellergroup.com

Corey Orvold
(206) 250-1892
Corey.Orvold@seattle.gov

Source: Medic One Foundation, Seattle Fire Department

Top 25

March 25, 2016 | by

PulsePoint President Richard Price named to Government Technology’s Top 25 innovators in the public sector

Government Technology’s Top 25 Doers, Dreamers, Drivers Revealed

Honorees cut through the public sector’s barriers to
innovation and succeed in improving services to citizens

SACRAMENTO, Calif. – March 24, 2016 – Government Technology announced its 2016 Top 25 Doers, Dreamers & Drivers – 25 individuals or teams who exemplify transformative use of technology that’s improving the way government does business and serves its citizens.

Showcased in the April/May issue of Government Technology magazine, this year’s list includes public and private sector technology leaders focused on customer-centric services, transparent operations, innovative processes and pioneering partnerships.

“This year’s Top 25 have a record of using technology to solve problems, improve citizen services and transform internal operations,” said Noelle Knell, editor, Government Technology magazine. “These are the people that have found ways to cut through the public sector’s barriers to innovation — tight budgets, organizational inertia, politics as usual, etc. — to reshape government operations for the better.”

Read the winners’ stories here.

Full Story

Government Technology’s Top 25 Doers, Dreamers & Drivers for 2016:

Harry Black, City Manager, Cincinnati

Maury Blackman, CEO, Accela

Michael Bott, Assistant Comptroller and CIO, New York City Office of the Comptroller

Charles Catlett, Director, Urban Center for Computation and Data at Argonne National Laboratory and the University of Chicago

Barbara Cohn, Chief Data Officer, New York

David Couch, K-12 CIO and Associate Commissioner of the Office of KIDS, Kentucky

Richard Culatta, Chief Innovation Officer, Rhode Island

Jack Dangermond, Founder and President, Esri

Mikey Dickerson, Administrator, U.S. Digital Service

Dickie Howze, CIO, Louisiana

Waldo Jaquith, Director, U.S. Open Data

Jessica Kahn, Director of the Data and Systems Group, Center for Medicaid and CHIP Services, Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services

William Kosinetz, CIO, Sussex County, N.J.

Thom Little, Director of Curriculum Development and Research, State Legislative Leaders Foundation

Craig Orgeron, CIO, Mississippi

Chris Osgood, Chief of Streets, Boston

Sachin Pavithran, Chairman, United States Access Board

Richard Price, Founder and President, PulsePoint Foundation

Calvin Rhodes, CIO, Georgia

Jorge Salinas, Assistant City Manager and CIO, Albany, Ore.

Ed Winfield, CIO, Wayne County, Mich., Department of Technology

Steve Zink, Vice Chancellor for Information Technology, Nevada System of Higher Education

Team California

  • Tim Garza, IT Director, California Natural Resources Agency, and CIO, California Department of Water Resources
  • Rita Gass, CIO, California Conservation Corps
  • John Laird, Secretary, California Natural Resources Agency
  • Tom Lupo, CIO, California Department of Fish and Wildlife
  • Phil Minas, CIO, California Department of Parks and Recreation
  • Ronald Ralph, CIO, California Department of Forestry and Fire Protection

Team San Francisco

  • Joy Bonaguro, Chief Data Officer
  • Miguel Gamiño, CIO
  • Jay Nath, Chief Innovation Officer

Team Obama
(This award acknowledges the leadership of the Obama administration in bringing on the first federal CIO and CTO; committing to openness through the Open Data Act and open government initiatives; creating agencies like 18F and the U.S. Digital Service; and investing in smart cities, cybersecurity and community broadband.)

Government Technology’s Top 25 Doers, Dreamers & Drivers annual award program has recognized nearly 400 people since its inception in 2002. Recipients are chosen based on their record of using technology to solve problems, improve citizen services and transform internal operations.

About Government Technology | www.govtech.com
Government Technology is about solving problems in state and local government through the smart use of technology. Government Technology is a division of e.Republic, the nation’s only media and research company focused exclusively on state and local government and education.

Media Contact:
Margaret Mohr | Chief Marketing Officer
mmohr@erepublic.com | 916-932-1364

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Hardin_Memorial_Hospital_featured

December 22, 2015 | by

HMH, Hardin County EMS, 911 partner to provide life-saving app

PulsePoint app notifies CPR-trained citizens of nearby cardiac arrests

ELIZABETHTOWN, Ky. – Beginning today, Hardin Memorial Health (HMH), Hardin County Emergency Medical Services (EMS) and Hardin County 911 are making a new life-saving smartphone app available in the market place. The app, called PulsePoint, is integrated in the county’s 911 system and alerts CPR-trained bystanders in the immediate vicinity of a cardiac emergency, so they can get to the scene and start CPR in the critical minutes before EMS teams arrive.

The three partners came together today at the Hardin County Government Building to announce the availability of the app. Hardin County is the second community in the state to make this app available – Erlanger, Kentucky was the first.

“We are thrilled to partner with Hardin County EMS and Hardin County 911 to bring this life-saving tool to Hardin County,” said Sharon Wright, HMH Chief Nursing Officer.

Wright added that every day, 1,000 people experience Sudden Cardiac Arrest (SCA), the leading cause of death in our country.

Director of Hardin County EMS John Malcomson said that number typically increases over the holidays.

“There couldn’t be a better time to roll this out,” Malcomson said.

The American Heart Association estimates that effective bystander CPR, provided immediately after sudden cardiac arrest, can double or triple a person’s chance of survival, but only about one quarter of SCA victims receive bystander CPR.

“We want to change that,” Malcomson said. “Minutes matter when it comes to savings lives, especially the life of someone experiencing a cardiac emergency. This app can make a difference in a life or death situation.”

Malcomson shared the real-life story of Rodney Druen, who attended the announcement. Druen went into cardiac arrest at his home in Sonora. His neighbor, a volunteer firefighter, administered CPR until EMS arrived.

“I wouldn’t be standing here today if it weren’t for my neighbor, Brad, and the excellent care I received from Hardin County EMS and Hardin Memorial Hospital,” Druen said.

Jamie Armstrong, EMS Supervisor, also encouraged more people in Hardin County to get CPR training.

“It’s easy to learn. There are classes available through the American Red Cross, Hardin County Government, HMH and the Lincoln Trail District Health Department, ,” said Armstrong. “This is a very caring community. What better way to take care of one another than to learn CPR and download this app?”

Bob Hammonds, 911 Director, who was also on hand for the event, reiterated that the community is pivotal to the success of the PulsePoint partnership.

“PulsePoint notifications are generated by the 911 dispatch,” Hammonds said. “It is important that all citizens know to call 911 in the event of a cardiac episode – no matter how seemingly small it is. Hesitating to call 911 could prevent life-saving CPR to be administered by a trained bystander.”

The PulsePoint app also alerts bystanders to any nearby public access automated external defibrillators (AED) which is yet another tool proven critical to surviving a cardiac emergency.

PulsePoint leaders gave the Hardin County partners high praise.

“We are inspired by the strong collaboration between Hardin County EMS, Hardin County 911 and Hardin Memorial Health to bring the PulsePoint app to their community,” said Richard Price, President of the PulsePoint Foundation. “PulsePoint will amplify the excellent work already accomplished around CPR training and public AED placement in the community. The leadership to drive early adoption of PulsePoint in Kentucky is exemplary.”

To get the PulsePoint app, go to www.pulsepoint.org/download or simply search for PulsePoint in the Apple App Store or on Google Play.

###

About HMH: Hardin Memorial Health (HMH) is an integrated system of health care providers throughout a 10-county region of Central Kentucky. HMH is committed to delivering the highest-quality patient-centered health care to the more than 400,000 people it serves. With more than 2,000 medical professionals including 230 first-in-class physicians in over 40 specialties as well as primary care and a 300-bed hospital, HMH provides comprehensive health care close to home for the residents of Hardin, Meade, Nelson, LaRue, Breckinridge, Grayson, Hart, Bullitt, Green and Taylor counties. HMH is a county owned system under a management contract with Kentucky’s Baptist Health, headquartered in Louisville, Kentucky.

About Hardin County EMS: Hardin County EMS serves the citizens of Hardin County, Kentucky. Hardin County EMS currently makes approximately 15,000 runs per year and have five 24-hour ALS ambulances covering the county 24 hours a day. It also has 10 hour ALS truck that covers the area 40 hours a week at peak times as well as three BLS Trucks that do non-emergent inter-facility transports. Hardin County EMS is the sole paramedic provider in Hardin County.

About Hardin County 911: Hardin County 911 is the official Public Safety Answering Point for Hardin County, KY. Hardin County 911 dispatches for Hardin County EMS, Hardin County Sheriff, 14 fire departments, Hardin County Emergency Management, Hardin County Animal Control and West Point Police Department. In addition, Hardin County 911 answers emergency calls for Elizabethtown Police, Radcliff Police and the KY State Police Post 4 and transfers calls for service to their dispatch centers. With 20 full time employees, Hardin County 911 takes pride in being the first link to emergency services for Hardin County.

Media Contact:
Megan Blaney, Heartland Communications Consultants
(631) 431-3011
megan@heartlandcommunicate.com

Source: Hardin County

OfficeOfMayorJohnsonFeatured

December 14, 2015 | by

Mayor Kevin Johnson Brings Lifesaving Technology to Sacramento region via 9-1-1 Integrated Mobile App

PulsePoint empowers CPR-trained citizens and off-duty professionals to provide critical assistance immediately following cardiac arrest

SACRAMENTO, CA – Mayor Kevin Johnson and Sacramento-area fire departments have joined with the PulsePoint Foundation to bring life-saving technology to the region via PulsePoint, a mobile app designed to increase citizen awareness of cardiac events beyond a traditional “witnessed” area and engage them in potentially life-saving CPR.

“In a 3.0 city, we need to provide residents services and infrastructure so that connected citizens become part of the city’s network to solve problems,” said Mayor Johnson. “That’s exactly what PulsePoint does. It gives our residents the ability to know when there is a cardiac arrest, respond quickly, and attempt potentially life saving CPR before paramedics arrive.”

The initiative was formally launched Monday, December 14th at an event at Cesar Chavez Plaza adjacent to City Hall in Sacramento. Mayor Kevin Johnson was joined by Sacramento Fire Chief Walt White, Consumnes Fire Chief Tracey Hansen, Sacramento Metro Fire Chief Mark Wells, Folsom Fire Chief Ron Phillips, Sacramento Regional Fire/EMS Communications Center Chief Executive Director Teresa Murray, and PulsePoint Foundation President Richard Price to discuss the rollout of the PulsePoint app and AED registry.

“By directly alerting those who are qualified and nearby, maybe in the business next door or on the floor above, PulsePoint is able to put the right people in the right place at the right time,” said Richard Price, President of the California-based 501(c)(3) nonprofit PulsePoint Foundation.

The latest AHA guidelines, published in October in Circulation, state that such community programs could increase bystander CPR to the roughly 326,000 cardiac arrests that happen outside the hospital each year.

“The project expands PulsePoint coverage to the 1.4 million citizens of Sacramento County over an area of 1,000 square miles,” said Walt White, Sacramento Fire Chief. “Participating agencies include the Sacramento Fire Department, Sacramento Metropolitan Fire District, Cosumnes Community Services District, and the Folsom Fire Department.”

About the PulsePoint Foundation
PulsePoint is a 501(c)(3) non-profit foundation based in the San Francisco Bay Area. Through the use of location-aware mobile devices PulsePoint is building applications that work with local public safety agencies to improve communications with citizens, empowering them to help reduce the millions of annual deaths from sudden cardiac arrest (SCA). Deployment of the PulsePoint app can significantly strengthen the “chain of survival” by improving bystander response to cardiac arrest victims and increasing the chance that lifesaving steps will be taken prior to the arrival of emergency medical services (EMS). PulsePoint is built and maintained by volunteer engineers at Workday and distributed by our marketing and implementation partner Physio-Control, Inc. CTIA Wireless Foundation is a key sponsor and advocate of PulsePoint, providing industry and financial support. Learn more at www.pulsepoint.org or join the conversation at Facebook and Twitter. The free app is available for download on iTunes and Google Play.

About Cardiac Arrest
Out-of-hospital cardiac arrest is a leading cause of death in the United States. The American Heart Association estimates that effective bystander CPR, provided immediately after cardiac arrest, can double or triple a person’s chance of survival. However, less than half of cardiac arrest victims receive bystander CPR and even fewer receive a potentially lifesaving therapeutic shock from a public access AED. Improving bystander CPR rates and access to AEDs is critical to the chain of survival, which requires: (1) early recognition of the emergency and phoning 911 for EMS, (2) early bystander CPR, (3) early delivery of a shock via a defibrillator if indicated and (4) early advanced life support and post-resuscitation care delivered by healthcare providers. Different than a heart attack, sudden cardiac arrest is caused when the heart’s electrical system malfunctions and the heart stops working properly. For every minute that passes without a cardiac arrest victim receiving resuscitation, the chances of that person surviving decrease 10 percent. After 10 minutes the chances of survival are minimal.

Source: City of Sacramento

Physio Logo

October 16, 2015 | by

New CPR Guidelines Recommend Using Social Media and Mobile Technology to Speed Bystander CPR in Sudden Cardiac Arrests

PulsePoint CPR Response App Already Downloaded More than 505,000 Times – More than 16,500 Cardiac Arrest Responders Alerted to Date

(16 October 2015 – Redmond, WA) – For the first time, CPR guidelines issued by the American Heart Association (AHA) recommend that communities consider using social media and mobile app technology to alert CPR responders when someone nearby suffers sudden cardiac arrest. The new guidelines cite studies that show emerging mobile technologies can result in a “higher rate of bystander-initiated CPR.”

The leading bystander response mobile application, PulsePoint Respond, alerts users when a sudden cardiac arrest occurs in a nearby public place, directs them to the patient location and provides CPR guidance while paramedic units are en route to the call. The app also notifies users of the closest available Automated External Defibrillator (AED).

To date, the PulsePoint app has been downloaded more than 505,000 times and has alerted more than 16,500 responders to the need for CPR in more than 6,500 suspected sudden cardiac arrest incidents. PulsePoint is now active in more than 1,200 communities in 24 U.S. states and Canadian provinces.

The PulsePoint app has played a key role in saving several lives. The first documented PulsePoint save involved a 57-year old truck driver near Portland, Oregon, who suffered sudden cardiac arrest outside his gym and received CPR from a PulsePoint responder. In Spokane, Washington a five-week old infant received CPR from a nearby off-duty EMS volunteer working at his job as a mechanic. In Sunnyvale, California, a 63-year old father of two collapsed on a soccer field and received CPR from a college student living nearby who received a PulsePoint alert on his mobile phone.

“PulsePoint-connected communities don’t need to rely on the luck of having a CPR-trained citizen witness a cardiac arrest,” said Richard Price, President of the PulsePoint Foundation. “By directly notifying those who are qualified and nearby, PulsePoint helps put the right people in the right place at the right time. PulsePoint builds on the good work that a community has done with CPR training and AED placement and improves the efficiency and use of these resources. Two-thirds of our 24-hour healthcare professionals – firefighters, paramedics, police officers, nurses, doctors – are off-duty at any one time. With PulsePoint, responders like these are available to assist if they are made aware of an urgent need nearby.”

The PulsePoint apps were created by and are a product of the PulsePoint Foundation. Physio-Control is the foundation’s implementation partner and provides services to integrate PulsePoint with public safety agency dispatch and communication systems.

“Apps like PulsePoint can help save lives,” said Brian Webster, President and CEO of Physio-Control. “This new AHA guidance is a strong call to action. Quick bystander response to sudden cardiac arrests – performing early CPR and finding and using an AED – is a vital part of an effective system of care. Mobile devices are already in millions of hands – PulsePoint Respond puts lifesaving skills and awareness into those hands.”

“The PulsePoint mobile device system, for the first time, changes the old paradigm of waiting for trained EMS responders to arrive on scene,” said Dr. Bentley Bobrow, Medical Director, Bureau of Emergency Medicine and Trauma Services, Arizona Department of Health and past Chair of the American Heart Association Basic Life Support Subcommittee. “PulsePoint allows communities to harness the enormous life-saving potential of their citizens, many of whom are ready and willing to perform CPR and use an AED in the most critical minutes before trained EMS providers can arrive.”

Information on how to download the free PulsePoint app is available at this site. Public safety agencies interested in becoming PulsePoint-connected can learn more here.

###

About Sudden Cardiac Arrest (SCA)
Sudden Cardiac Arrest is the abrupt loss of heart function in a person who may or may not have diagnosed heart disease. Death can occur shortly after symptoms appear without rapid intervention and treatment. Each year, more than 420,000 emergency medical services-assessed cardiac arrests occur in the United States. The American Heart Association states that “there is clear and consistent evidence of improved survival from sudden cardiac arrest when a bystander performs CPR and rapidly uses an AED.”

About the PulsePoint Foundation
PulsePoint is a 501(c)(3) non-profit foundation based in the San Francisco Bay Area. Through the use of location-aware mobile devices PulsePoint is building applications that work with local public safety agencies to improve communications with citizens, empowering them to help reduce the millions of annual deaths from sudden cardiac arrest (SCA). Deployment of the PulsePoint app can significantly strengthen the “chain of survival” by improving bystander response to cardiac arrest victims and increasing the chance that lifesaving steps will be taken prior to the arrival of emergency medical services (EMS). PulsePoint is supported by the Wireless Foundation, built and maintained by volunteer engineers at Workday and distributed by our marketing and implementation partner Physio-Control, Inc. Learn more at www.pulsepoint.org or join the conversation at Facebook and Twitter. The free app is available for download on iTunes and Google Play.

About Physio-Control
Physio-Control, Inc. is headquartered in Redmond, Washington. The company was founded in 1955 and is the world’s leading provider of professional emergency medical response solutions that predict or intervene in life-threatening emergencies. The company’s products include LIFEPAK® monitor/defibrillators and automated external defibrillators, the LIFENET® System, HealthEMS® electronic patient care reporting (ePCR) software, LUCAS® 2 Chest Compression System, TrueCPRTM coaching device, McGrath® MAC EMS video laryngoscope and implementation for PulsePoint mobile bystander response applications. Learn more at www.physio-control.com, or connect on Facebook, LinkedIn or Twitter.

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Matt Fikse, Physio-Control, +1 425-867-4208, matt.fikse@physio-control.com
Shannon Smith, PulsePoint Foundation, +1 773-339-7513, ssmith@smithmediarelations.com

Sunrise Seal

October 1, 2015 | by

PulsePoint App Launches in Sunrise

With the launch of a new smartphone application, saving lives and preventing catastrophic injuries is now just one click away. Effective October 1, 2015, the PulsePoint Respond smartphone application, or app, is active throughout the City of Sunrise. This free app, available for both Android and Apple platforms, takes advantage of citizens and off-duty professionals who are trained in CPR and also willing to assist in the event of an emergency.

With location-aware software linked to the 911 system, PulsePoint Respond notifies registered users when someone may be in need of CPR in a nearby public place. If the app user responds to the alert, they are given further instructions if an AED is also nearby. As a result, PulsePoint users can potentially find a victim of cardiac arrest, begin CPR, and implement an AED during the time it takes for Fire-Rescue paramedics to arrive.

“We are proud to support the first launch in South Florida of this important life-saving technology tool,” said Sunrise Mayor Michael J. Ryan. “This app will not only inspire people to learn hands-only CPR and how to use an AED, this app will most certainly alter and save lives when minutes matter.”

With more than 1,000 people in the U.S. dying each day from cardiac arrest, the life-saving potential of bystander intervention cannot be overstated. Four out of five cardiac arrests happen outside of a hospital setting. Sadly, the likelihood of surviving a cardiac arrest falls by 10% for every minute that a person does not receive CPR assistance. In fact, national survival rates are below 8% due, in part, to the lack of effective bystander CPR assistance. In addition, without timely CPR and AED assistance many who survive must endure a lifetime of residual neurological injuries. However, study after study proves effective bystander CPR provided immediately after sudden cardiac arrest can double, and even triple, a victim’s chance of survival and reduce if not eliminate permanent and debilitating injuries.

“Normally, less than a third of these victims receive CPR from a bystander,” said Sunrise Fire-Rescue Chief Thomas DiBernardo. “Widespread participation in the PulsePoint app can significantly improve survival rates for these patients.”

For more information about PulsePoint Respond and PulsePoint AED, please visit www.pulsepoint.org.

Source: City of Sunrise

City of Santa Clara Seal

September 29, 2015 | by

Mobile App Helps Save Life of Santa Clara Cardiac Arrest Victim

Life-saving CPR performed after mobile app notifies nearby off-duty ER physician to emergency

SANTA CLARA, Calif., September 30, 2015 – On Sunday, May 24, 2015, 53-year old Santa Clara resident Kory Trebbin was attending church when, without warning, he suffered a sudden cardiac arrest (SCA) and was left unresponsive and without a pulse. Witnesses dialed 9-1-1 to alert authorities and while professional first responders were called to the scene, a nearby off-duty ER physician simultaneously received an alert via her smartphone notifying her of this emergency just blocks from her house. The alert was sent via PulsePoint, a 9-1-1 connected mobile app designed to alert CPR-trained citizens of SCA emergencies in their vicinity.

KTVU Newscast: PulsePoint app alerts nearby CPR-trained bystanders

The PulsePoint mobile app is designed to reduce collapse-to-CPR and collapse-to-defibrillation times by increasing CPR-trained citizen awareness of cardiac events beyond a traditional “witnessed” area. The app also directs users to the precise location of nearby public Automated External Defibrillators (AEDs).

The PulsePoint app directed the off-duty ER physician to the exact location of the emergency based on the 9-1-1 call information. Using this information, the physician made her way to the nearby church where Mr. Trebbin had collapsed and remained lifeless. The off-duty physician, who handles these medical emergencies everyday on the job, performed CPR until a Santa Clara Police Officer arrived equipped with an AED. The AED was used to deliver a shock before fire department paramedics arrived on the scene.

Because of the physicians’ advanced training she presented her credentials to the arriving paramedics and assumed patient responsibility onsite. The physician, alongside paramedics, delivered three additional shocks to Mr. Trebbin before his heart established a productive rhythm. The team then transported him to the closest hospital, which happened to be where the off-duty physician was a practicing emergency room doctor. She was able to alert the attending doctor to Mr. Trebbin’s condition from the ambulance, seamlessly transferring his care.

Mr. Trebbin was without a heart beat for a reported 18 minutes, but walked out of the hospital, healthy and without cognitive impairment, just four days later.

“It’s a miracle I’m alive,” said Kory Trebbin. “I’m so thankful to those who called 9-1-1 and to the professional first responders who rushed to the scene. But the reason I’m alive today is because PulsePoint connected me to someone who could, and did, save my life.”

Santa Clara County was one of the first counties in the nation to fully integrate this technology with its 9-1-1 system. The collaboration and allocated resources from the Santa Clara County fire departments, the PulsePoint Foundation, El Camino Hospital and the tech company Workday brought this lifesaving technology to Santa Clara County citizens. The coordinated effort by the Santa Clara Fire Department, the Santa Clara Police Department, the PulsePoint-notified citizen responder and the care provided by the emergency room combined to save Mr. Trebbin’s life.

About the PulsePoint Foundation
PulsePoint is a 501(c)(3) non-profit foundation based in the San Francisco Bay Area. Through the use of location-aware mobile devices PulsePoint is building applications that work with local public safety agencies to improve communications with citizens, empowering them to help reduce the millions of annual deaths from sudden cardiac arrest (SCA). Deployment of the PulsePoint app can significantly strengthen the “chain of survival” by improving bystander response to cardiac arrest victims and increasing the chance that lifesaving steps will be taken prior to the arrival of emergency medical services (EMS). PulsePoint is supported by the Wireless Foundation, built and maintained by volunteer engineers at Workday and distributed by our marketing and implementation partner Physio-Control, Inc. Learn more at www.pulsepoint.org or join the conversation at Facebook and Twitter. The free app is available for download on iTunes and Google Play.

About Cardiac Arrest
Out-of-hospital cardiac arrest is a leading cause of death in the United States, accounting for an estimated 424,000 deaths each year, more than 1,000 deaths per day. The American Heart Association estimates that effective bystander CPR, provided immediately after cardiac arrest, can double or triple a person’s chance of survival. However, less than half of cardiac arrest victims receive bystander CPR and even fewer receive a potentially lifesaving therapeutic shock from a public access AED. Improving bystander CPR rates and access to AEDs is critical to the chain of survival, which requires: (1) early recognition of the emergency and phoning 911 for EMS, (2) early bystander CPR, (3) early delivery of a shock via a defibrillator if indicated and (4) early advanced life support and post-resuscitation care delivered by healthcare providers. Different than a heart attack, sudden cardiac arrest is caused when the heart’s electrical system malfunctions and the heart stops working properly. For every minute that passes without a SCA victim receiving resuscitation, the chances of that person surviving decrease 10 percent. After 10 minutes the chances of survival are minimal.

About Santa Clara
Santa Clara is a family-oriented and business-friendly city, led by a city government that has developed an award-winning ethics program and a commitment to fostering public trust. Located in Santa Clara County at the southern end of San Francisco Bay, about 45 miles south of San Francisco, Santa Clara is a strategic regional hub, convenient to freeways, airports, railroads, expressways, light rail and other public transportation. Home to global companies such as Intel and Citrix, world-class educational institutions like Santa Clara University, and the San Francisco 49ers who play at Levi’s Stadium. The City of Santa Clara offers history, innovation, culture, sports and fun and represents The Center of What’s Possible.

Media contact:
Shannon Smith
ssmith@smithmediarelations.com
O: (616) 724-4256
C: (773) 339-7513

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