RT Magazine

August 26, 2015 | by

Mobile Devices Alerting CPR-trained Bystanders of Nearby Victims

The use of mobile phone technology to alert bystanders trained in CPR is helping cardiac arrest victims receive prompt and critical care

Bystander CPRCardiac arrest is a severe health issue that poses a threat of brain damage and death. The American Heart Association reports that more than 420,000 emergency medical services-assessed out-of-hospital cardiac arrests occur annually.

With the significant benefits of early CPR and intervention, it is imperative that cardiac arrest patients outside of a hospital receive immediate care. The use of mobile phone technology and new mobile apps currently being developed in the United States and abroad can aid cardiac arrest victims in receiving prompt care by alerting CPR-trained volunteers in the area that an emergency situation requires their attention.

Benefits of Early Intervention
According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), approximately 92% of people who have sudden cardiac arrest outside of a hospital setting will die. However, previous research does show that receiving rescue breaths and chest compression from a bystander while waiting for emergency care can improve the chances of survival, although only about 30% of cardiac arrest patients receive critical bystander CPR.

A New England Journal of Medicine study conducted by researchers from the Center for Resuscitation Science at Karolinska Institute, in collaboration with several other Swedish universities, analyzed over 30,000 cases of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest over a 30-year period in Sweden.2 The results of this study reveal that cardiopulmonary resuscitation performed before the arrival of the ambulance is associated with over a two-fold increase in the chance of survival.

In addition, one of the key findings in the book Strategies to Improve Cardiac Arrest Survival: A Time to Act is that the immediate, hands-on response of bystanders to cardiac arrest is critical to improve rates of effective resuscitation and, thereby, increase the likelihood of survival and positive neurologic outcomes for out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. The authors of the text also noted that many national and international registry studies indicate that bystander CPR can increase survival rates for out-of-hospital cardiac arrest between 50% and 500%.

Mobile Lifesavers
An additional study conducted by the same group of international researchers evaluated a pilot program in Stockholm County, Sweden, which provided text message alerts to CPR-trained volunteers when a reported cardiac arrest was occurring 500 meters or closer to them. The study included 10,000 civilian volunteers with the mobile app, known as SMS Lifesavers, who were alerted of the cardiac emergency. With the use of the app, there was a 30% increase in the number of patients who received cardiopulmonary resuscitation before the arrival of paramedics, the police, or rescue services, according to the Karolinska Institute. The authors of the study concluded, “A mobile-phone positioning system to dispatch lay volunteers who were trained in CPR was associated with significantly increased rates of bystander-initiated CPR among persons with out-of-hospital cardiac arrest.”

According to Jacob Hollenberg, MD, cardiologist and head of research at the Center for Resuscitation Science, the system now includes 14,000 volunteers. In addition, the researchers have recently launched a new and updated service based on GPS technology that not only dispatches volunteers for CPR but also to get the nearest available public automated external defibrillator (AED).

Hollenberg stated, “Both of these studies clearly show that cardiopulmonary resuscitation is an effective, life-saving treatment and that further encouragement must be given to respond swiftly on suspected cardiac arrest.”

In the US, several cities, including Los Angeles and San Diego, as well as Plano, Tex, have implemented similar systems to garner the aid of CPR-trained volunteers for cardiac arrest victims. One such development is the new PulsePoint app also designed to alert CPR-trained volunteers in the event of a nearby cardiac arrest. Users of the app who have indicated they are trained in CPR will be notified on their mobile phone if someone nearby is having a cardiac emergency and may require CPR. According to the PulsePoint website, the app is designed to empower CPR-trained citizens to help improve patient outcomes and save lives by reducing collapse-to-CPR and collapse-to-defibrillation times.

The mobile app PulsePoint has recruited hundreds of thousands of volunteers and connected itself to hundreds of emergency response systems. “PulsePoint engages citizens in the health of their community by empowering them to become a critical and effective part of the chain of survival. We know early intervention leads to better outcomes and PulsePoint aims to activate an army of citizen first responders,” said Richard Price, founder of PulsePoint. “The promise is to crowd-source good Samaritans.”

How to Save a Life
In the future, the use of mobile “alert” technology may be applicable to other areas of medicine and other types of emergency situations. According to Price, the use of these new mobile phone apps can possibly be used in “medical emergencies requiring rapid field intervention, such as severe allergic reactions requiring epinephrine (EpiPen) or opioid depression, including respiratory depression, [and for persons who] could benefit from overdose-reversing drugs like Naloxone (Narcan).”

For now, however, the growing use of mobile technology is helping provide swift, critical care to cardiac arrest victims and improving their chances of survival. Hollenberg said, “Out-of-hospital cardiac arrest is a major health problem. We need to find new ways of increasing rates of bystander CPR in order to really affect survival.” Hollenberg added, “I believe this new method is a way forward that will increase not only the proportion of patients receiving bystander CPR but also early increase early defibrillation and survival.”

Source: RT Magazine article by Cassandra Perez

San Diego Logo Trio

August 25, 2015 | by

Thousands of San Diegans Register for Life-Saving Apps

More than 35,000 San Diego County residents now receive alerts on their phones letting them know of a chance to potentially save someone’s life nearby.

That’s how many people have downloaded and registered for the PulsePoint Respond app in the past year since it launched locally. The app, which is free, lets users trained in CPR know when and where their help is needed.

A second app, called PulsePoint AED, lets users know where automatic external defibrillators (AED) are located nearby. The chance of saving a victim of cardiac arrest doubles when AEDs are used in addition to CPR.

The mobile apps were launched in July 2014 and March 2015 in a partnership between the County, City of San Diego, San Diego County Fire Chiefs’ Association, American Medical Response, Rural/Metro and the PulsePoint Foundation.

San Diego PulsePoint Launch

More than 1,800 local AEDs are also now listed in the PulsePoint AED app. As part of the crowdsourcing campaign in March, participants competed for prizes by using the app to identify both new and existing AEDs to expand the database of AED locations. The effort increased awareness about both apps and resulted in the registration of dozens of new AEDs.

“The more users we can add, and AEDs we can register, the more lives we have a chance to save,” said San Diego County Board of Supervisors Chairman Bill Horn. “By working together to introduce and integrate this technology into the community, we are making San Diego a safer place to live.”

San Diego iPhone 6 AED MapThe crowdsourcing campaign participants received “points” for registering AEDs in the community. The Wireless Foundation launched an accompanying Twitter campaign to encourage San Diego residents to join the contest. Joe Ferraro, an Assistant Chief of Emergency Medical Services for the Miramar Fire Department, received the most points and won a new iPad, courtesy of American Medical Response. Other prizes included a signed Chargers football, signed Padres hat, Balboa Park and Midway Museum passes and Amazon gift cards.

“I want to thank all of the county residents who helped us add and verify AEDs through PulsePoint,” said Supervisor Ron Roberts, who led the effort to bring PulsePoint and its sister app to all of San Diego County. “Their efforts are making a difference. Chief Ferraro himself is a great example of how our firefighters are embracing PulsePoint. It’s also exciting to see the two apps bringing the community and first responders together in a joint effort.”

The PulsePoint app has proven especially popular with emergency responders.

“PulsePoint is something all of the local fire agencies are excited about,” said Don Butz, President of the San Diego County Fire Chiefs’ Association and Chief of Viejas Fire Department. “We’ve encouraged all of our firefighters and paramedics to download the app. It’s our way of always being available to save a life, even when we’re not on-duty. I encourage every resident who has CPR training to download the app and join our effort.”

The way the app works is all registered users who are within a quarter mile of someone in cardiac distress receives an alert on their phone asking them to respond. Up pops a map on your smartphone, as well as the location of an AED device if one is nearby.

Both of the free apps are available through Google Play or the Apple App Store. While the campaign is over, it’s still important to register AEDs with PulsePoint AED as it could save the life of someone in need. San Diegans are also encouraged to get trained in CPR, learn how to use AEDs, and sign up to receive the PulsePoint alerts and respond if needed. The American Red Cross, American Heart Association, and San Diego Project Heartbeat provide CPR and AED trainings throughout the year.

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Source: San Diego County News Center

Lucas County

August 6, 2015 | by

Lucas County Commissioners Launch PulsePoint App For Lucas County Residents

Smartphone app empowers CPR-trained users to provide help immediately following sudden cardiac arrest

Toledo, OH – The Lucas County Commissioners have partnered with the PulsePoint Foundation to bring life-saving technology to the residents of Lucas County via a mobile app designed to increase citizen awareness of cardiac events and engage them in potentially life-saving CPR. The unique, location-aware, app alerts registered users when a sudden cardiac arrest occurs in a public place within their immediate vicinity.

The Board of Lucas County Commissioners offered this statement: “We highly encourage all Lucas County residents not only to download this life saving mobile app but also to become CPR certified and learn a skill that could one day save a life.”

Cardiac Arrest is one of the leading causes of death, affecting hundreds of thousands of people in the United States each year. Effective CPR administered immediately after cardiac arrest can potentially increase the victim’s chance of survival. Connected with the Lucas County Emergency 911 Dispatch Center, the PulsePoint app alerts CPR-trained bystanders when a sudden cardiac arrest occurs in a public place within a quarter-mile of their immediate vicinity. Users will be able to quickly find the victim and begin CPR immediately while waiting for EMS to arrive. The app also gives detailed instructions and locations of nearby automatic external defibrillators (AEDs).

The PulsePoint app can be downloaded for free on any mobile device. Additionally there is a PulsePoint AED app, which allows the public to register locations of publicly accessible AEDs. For more information on the PulsePoint apps, visit: http://www.pulsepoint.org/pulsepointrespond/.

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Filed Under: News, Press Release | Tagged With: , , ,
SBCFD Logo

June 25, 2015 | by

PulsePoint App Now Available To Santa Barbara County

Mobile app empowers CPR-trained users and off-duty professionals to provide help immediately after cardiac arrest.

NEWS RELEASE
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

SANTA BARBARA, CA. June 22, 2015 – To aid cardiac arrest victims quickly, The PulsePoint mobile app will be made available to individuals throughout Santa Barbara County beginning Thursday, June 25. This free app, which is available for both Android and iPhones, is aimed at average citizens and off-duty professionals trained in CPR. The app alerts registered users when a sudden cardiac arrest occurs in a public place in their immediate vicinity. Informed at the same time as emergency responders, users are given detailed instructions, including the location of automatic external defibrillators (AEDs) nearby.

Cardiac arrest is the leading cause of death outside of hospitals in the U.S. Cardiac arrest is responsible for more than 1,000 deaths a day and 424,000 a year. Effective CPR administered immediately after a cardiac arrest can potentially double or triple the victim’s chance of survival, but less than half of victims receive that immediate help. Connected with the Santa Barbara County Emergency 911 Dispatch Center, the PulsePoint app alerts CPR-trained bystanders when a sudden cardiac arrest occurs in a safe public place within their immediate vicinity. Users will be able to quickly find the victim and begin CPR immediately rather than idly waiting for EMS to arrive. The app also gives detailed instructions and locations of nearby automatic external defibrillators (AEDs).

“PulsePoint has been made available to the citizens of Santa Barbara County through a generous grant from the Aware & Prepare Initiative” said Eric Peterson, Santa Barbara County Fire Chief. “We are very excited to launch this life-saving app in Santa Barbara County”. A joint press conference with all participating agencies announcing the official launch of PulsePoint will be held at Santa Barbara County Fire Department Headquarters on Thursday, June 25 at 3:30 pm (4410 Cathedral Oaks Rd. Santa Barbara, CA).

Contact Information:
Captain Dave Zaniboni
Information Officer
Office 805-681-5531
Cell 805-689-0599
News Line 805-681-5546
Email david.zaniboni@sbcfire.com
Twitter @SBCFireInfo

All Santa Barbara County Fire Department News Releases are available at
www.sbcfire.com

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Source: Santa Barbara County Fire Department

LA Times Logo

June 14, 2015 | by

Crowdsourcing CPR gets more help to cardiac arrest victims

If you go into cardiac arrest, getting help within the first few minutes can mean the difference between life and death. A new study shows that help can get to victims more quickly with a mobile-phone app that directs people who know CPR to medical emergencies near them.

The researchers call their app a “mobile-phone positioning system,” an homage to the network of satellites that make up the global positioning system, or GPS. The app uses the GPS function in mobile phones to find and contact bystanders trained in cardiopulmonary resuscitation who happen to be in the vicinity of a reported cardiac emergency. CPR-trained volunteers download the app if they are willing to get the alerts.

Dr. Leif Svensson, a cardiologist at the Center for Resuscitation Science at Karolinska Institutet in Stockholm, conceived of the research project 10 years ago during his morning commute. A 50-year-old woman’s heart stopped right outside the bus he was on.

“Nobody on the bus, including myself, saw this,” he said.

But when he arrived at the hospital for work, he saw the woman again, dead upon arrival in the emergency room.

“I was sitting approximately 10 to 15 feet from the place where she had her cardiac arrest,” Svensson recalled. If he had known of her condition earlier, he would have been able to help by performing CPR.

So Svensson recruited some colleagues and devised a system to “find your closest lifesaver,” as he put it. Whenever someone reported a case of cardiac arrest to emergency responders, all CPR-trained volunteers who were within about a third of a mile of the patient would receive a text message and a phone call to alert them to the emergency and the patient’s location.

To test how well it worked, Svensson and his team enlisted nearly 10,000 CPR-trained volunteers to participate in the study. The team activated the network and put out a call to volunteers after 306 cardiac arrests over a 20-month period. In those cases, a volunteer was able to initiate CPR 62% of the time.

View the full story by Sasha Harris-Lovett at the Los Angeles Times.

Nejm_logo2011

June 10, 2015 | by

Clinical Trial: Mobile-Phone Dispatch of Laypersons for CPR in Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest

Bystander-initiated cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) before the arrival of emergency-medical-services (EMS) personnel is associated with a rate of survival among patients with out-of-hospital cardiac arrest that is up to three times as high as the rate among patients who do not receive such assistance. Low rates of bystander-initiated CPR are a major obstacle to improved survival rates.

The usual approach to increase rates of bystander-initiated CPR has been to train as much of the public as possible. However, this approach is associated with substantial costs and uncertain effects on rates of bystander-initiated CPR. With the use of a mobile-phone positioning system, persons who have mobile phones can be located and sent to assist patients with suspected out-of-hospital cardiac arrest; this approach has been reported in prior pilot and simulation studies.

We hypothesized that the use of a mobile-phone positioning system to dispatch lay responders who are trained in CPR to assist patients with suspected out-of-hospital cardiac arrest would increase the proportion of cases in which CPR was performed by trained bystanders.

Conclusion
The use of a mobile-phone positioning system for location and dispatch of lay volunteers who were trained in CPR to patients nearby who had out-of-hospital cardiac arrest significantly increased the rate of bystander-initiated CPR.

Read more about the study and results in The New England Journal of Medicine.

City-of-Plano-Logo-with-Tagline-24-featured

April 19, 2015 | by

New Plano Smartphone App to Help Heart Attack Victims

The City of Plano will hold a press conference on Monday, April 20, 2017 at 10:00 AM to kick off a new smartphone app designed to help save more lives from sudden cardiac arrest (SCA). PulsePoint empowers everyday citizens to provide life-saving assistance to SCA victims. People who are trained in CPR and are willing to assist in case of an emergency can now be notified through an app, if someone nearby is having a cardiac emergency and may require CPR. If the cardiac emergency is in a public place, the app will alert trained citizens in the vicinity of the need for bystander CPR. This will happen at the same time advanced medical care is dispatched. The app also uses maps to direct these citizen rescuers to the exact location of the closest publicly accessible Automated External Defibrillator or AED. In many cases nationwide, nearby AEDs have not been used when they may have made a difference. PulsePoint aims to address this type of failure by informing citizen rescuers where the nearest AED is located – in real-time and in context of their current location. “PulsePoint gives us the ability to alert trained citizens near the area that someone is in cardiac distress; they can then provide CPR until emergency responders can get to the scene,” says Fire Chief Marty Wade.

Speakers at the press conference will include Plano Mayor Harry LaRosiliere, Plano Fire Chief Marty Wade, Public Safety Communications Director Susan Carr and John S. Doe, a heart attack victim whose life was saved by a CPR-trained citizen.

For a video on PulsePoint, click on this link: http://www.pulsepoint.org/pulsepoint-respond/

The press conference will be held at the Tom Muehlenbeck Recreation Center on Monday April 20, 2015 at 10:00 AM. The Muehlenbeck Center is located at 5801 W. Parker Road in Plano.

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Editor’s Note: Go to the City’s Media Center for comprehensive information about the City of Plano.

Media Contact
Steve Stoler, Director
Media Relations
Ph. (972) 941-7321
Mo. (972) 345-1393
Stevest@plano.gov

About Plano
Plano, Texas, is the largest city in Collin County with a population of 269,330 as of January 2014. Incorporated in 1873, the city is located 20 miles north of Dallas. Plano was recently named the third Best Run City in America by 24/7 Wall Street. The City offers a high quality of life that includes: nationally-recognized schools, award-winning parks and sustainability initiatives, designation as one of America’s safest cities by Forbes magazine, and a wide variety of multi-cultural neighborhoods appealing to families, young singles and retirees. Plano is home to many major international corporations and Fortune 500 headquarters such as JC Penney, Dr. Pepper/Snapple Group, Rent-A-Center, Cinemark Holdings, Denbury Resources and Alliance Data Systems. The dynamic community features excellent restaurants, vibrant shopping and entertainment venues, a lively historic downtown district and active local arts scene. Easy access to DART light rail and major highways makes Plano a convenient place to live, work and visit. To learn more about Plano, go to our website at plano.gov.

Cupertino Seal

April 15, 2015 | by

“Find the AED Contest”: Residents Asked To Find Automated External Defibrillators (AED) For A Chance To Win Prizes

CONTACT:
County Fire – Stephanie Stuehler
408.335.8897 or
stephanie.stuehler@sccfd.org

Cupertino, CA – April 15, 2015 – Santa Clara County Fire Department in collaboration with the City of Cupertino, El Camino Hospital, and the PulsePoint Foundation announce the launch of the “Find the AED Contest”. Participants locate and submit photos of unregistered automated external defibrillators (AED) by using the PulsePoint AED app on their smart phone.

The contest will run from April 15 – May 15, 2015 and the top three winners who find the most AEDs in Santa Clara County Fire Department’s jurisdiction and specifically in the City of Cupertino will each receive a prize, such as an Apple Watch.

“Members of the community can use their smart phone to take photos of AEDs and upload the location information to the PulsePoint AED registry,” said Santa Clara County Fire Department’s Fire Chief, Ken Kehmna. “It is important to build an accurate registry to enable professional first responders and citizens responding to PulsePoint alerts to quickly find and use AEDs during emergencies. This contest will help us build that registry.”

The American Heart Association estimates that immediate cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) and early defibrillation with an AED can more than double a victim’s chance of survival. The PulsePoint AED and PulsePoint Respond apps are available for free download from the iTunes Store and Google Play. For more information about the contest, please visit www.sccfd.org/newsevents.

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Source: Santa Clara County Fire Department

abc-world-news-tonight

April 13, 2015 | by

ABC World News Tonight: PulsePoint Uses Social Media to Save Lives

On March 25, 2015, off-duty EMT Walter Huber received an alert through PulsePoint of a cardiac arrest at the school across the street from his home in Sunnyvale, CA.

Sunnyvale Logo

April 13, 2015 | by

PulsePoint App Helps Save Life of Cardiac Arrest Victim

Media contacts:

Shannon Smith, PulsePoint Foundation
ssmith@smithmediarelations.com
O: (616) 724-4256
C: (773) 339-7513

Chris Ernst, El Camino Hospital
Chris_Ernst@elcaminohospital.org
O: (650) 962-5853
C: (415) 710-9445

Life-saving CPR performed after mobile app funded by El Camino Hospital
notifies nearby citizen responder

SUNNYVALE, Calif., April 13, 2015 – On Wednesday, March 25, 2015 lifelong Sunnyvale resident Walter Huber was sitting down to dinner when he received an alert through PulsePoint, a 9-1-1 connected mobile app designed to alert CPR-trained citizens of sudden cardiac arrest (SCA) emergencies in their vicinity. This app alert helped save a man’s life.

The PulsePoint app displayed a map showing Huber, 21, the location of the emergency, which was based on 9-1-1 call information. Using this map Huber made his way to the reported SCA patient’s location—a soccer field just steps from his home—where he found a man unconscious and surrounded by his teammates. Just minutes earlier the man had collapsed, unresponsive and without a pulse, prompting his teammates to call 9-1-1. Huber, who is CPR trained, immediately assessed the patient and began hands-only CPR. He provided chest compressions until a Sunnyvale Department of Public Safety Officer arrived in a patrol car equipped with an Automated External Defibrillator (AED). The AED delivered a life-saving shock, effectively bringing Farid Rashti, 63, back to life.

“When someone suffers a sudden cardiac arrest, the heart stops beating without any warning so time is critical,” said Dr. Chad Rammohan, M.D., medical director of Cardiac Catheterization Lab and Chest Pain Center at El Camino Hospital and a Palo Alto Medical Foundation physician. “It’s the ‘electrical shock’ from the AED that helps to restore the person’s heartbeat and it’s the mechanical pumping from CPR that helps the SCA victim to recover some blood flow to vital organs such as the brain, heart, and the rest of the body.”

Full Story

A family history of heart disease coupled with a 2004 heart attack, resulting in quadruple bypass surgery, has led Rashti, a Campbell, Calif. resident, to live a healthy lifestyle. However, while playing soccer on March 25th, he was hit by the ball on the left side of his chest. He felt a sharp pain, unlike during his earlier heart attack. He switched to goalie where he could catch his breath when, he recalls “suddenly everything started to go black and that is the last thing I remember.” Rashti had suffered a SCA. The only way for a person to survive a SCA is to immediately receive 1) CPR, 2) an electrical shock from an AED, and 3) transport to the closest hospital emergency room.

“Thankfully the PulsePoint app alerted me to someone in need, only steps away, so I could put my training to good use and, as it turns out, help save a life,” said Huber, a Mission College student. “The fact that you could potentially save a life with this app confirms how important it is for everyone to learn CPR and download PulsePoint.”

“I’m so grateful that I was in public, surrounded by people,” said Rashti from his home where he’s been recovering. “Without my friends calling 9-1-1, the PulsePoint responder starting CPR and the patrol officer shocking me back to life with an AED, I would not be alive today.”

Santa Clara County, in which the City of Sunnyvale is located, was one of the first counties in the nation to fully integrate this technology with its 9-1-1 system. The collaboration and allocated resources from the Santa Clara County fire departments, the PulsePoint Foundation, El Camino Hospital, and the tech company Workday brought this lifesaving technology to Santa Clara County citizens. The coordinated effort by Santa Clara County, Rashti’s teammates, the PulsePoint-notified citizen responder and the care provided by the emergency room at Kaiser Permanente Santa Clara Medical Center helped save Rashti’s life.

“Every element in this chain of survival was enhanced by quick action and cutting edge technology. All Sunnyvale public safety officers are trained as police officers, firefighters and EMTs so they arrive on scene and immediately bring life-saving support with an AED and first aid equipment,” said Steve Drewniany, Deputy Chief of the Sunnyvale Department of Public Safety. “It was the quick action by Farid’s friends and Walter that set the entire response in motion. You couldn’t ask for a better example of how technology like PulsePoint and AEDs can save lives, which is why we’re making full use of them here in Sunnyvale.”

The PulsePoint mobile app is designed to reduce collapse-to-CPR and collapse-to-defibrillation times by increasing citizen awareness of cardiac events beyond a traditional “witnessed” area. The app also directs users to the precise location of nearby public AEDs. The free app is available for download on iTunes and Google Play.

About the PulsePoint Foundation
PulsePoint is a 501(c)(3) non-profit foundation based in the San Francisco Bay Area. Through the use of location-aware mobile devices PulsePoint is building applications that work with local public safety agencies to improve communications with citizens, empowering them to help reduce the millions of annual deaths from sudden cardiac arrest (SCA). Deployment of the PulsePoint app can significantly strengthen the “chain of survival” by improving bystander response to cardiac arrest victims and increasing the chance that lifesaving steps will be taken prior to the arrival of emergency medical services (EMS). PulsePoint is supported by the Wireless Foundation, built and maintained by volunteer engineers at Workday and distributed by our marketing and implementation partner Physio-Control, Inc. Learn more at www.pulsepoint.org or join the conversation at Facebook and Twitter.

About Sunnyvale Department of Public Safety
Located in the San Francisco Bay Area, the City of Sunnyvale Department of Public Safety is one of the largest fully-integrated Police, Fire, and Emergency Medical Services (EMS) public entities in the United States serving a City of over 147,000 residents. All of the Department’s Officers are fully qualified cross-trained Police Officers, Firefighters, and EMT-Basic professionals. Public Safety Officers fulfill these roles in their daily duties, ensuring the highest levels of efficiency and competency for the Sunnyvale community.

About El Camino Hospital
El Camino Hospital is an acute-care, 443-bed, nonprofit and locally governed organization with campuses in Mountain View and Los Gatos, California. In addition to heart and vascular care, key medical specialties include behavioral health, cancer, men’s health, neuroscience, orthopedic and spine, senior health, urology, and the first Women’s Hospital in Northern California. The hospital is recognized as a national leader in the use of health information technology and wireless communications, and has been awarded the Gold Seal of Approval from The Joint Commission as a Primary Stroke Center as well as back-to-back ANCC Magnet Recognitions for Nursing Care. To learn more, visit our website, find us on Facebook, follow us on Twitter, or view videos on YouTube. For a physician referral, visit our website or call the El Camino Health Line at 800-216-5556.

About Cardiac Arrest
Out-of-hospital cardiac arrest is a leading cause of death in the United States, accounting for an estimated 424,000 deaths each year, more than 1,000 deaths per day. The American Heart Association estimates that effective bystander CPR, provided immediately after cardiac arrest, can double or triple a person’s chance of survival. However, less than half of cardiac arrest victims receive bystander CPR and even fewer receive a potentially lifesaving therapeutic shock from a public access AED. Improving bystander CPR rates and access to AEDs is critical to chain of survival, which requires: (1) early recognition of the emergency and phoning 911 for EMS, (2) early bystander CPR, (3) early delivery of a shock via a defibrillator if indicated and (4) early advanced life support and post-resuscitation care delivered by healthcare providers.

Different than a heart attack, sudden cardiac arrest is caused when the heart’s electrical system malfunctions and the heart stops working properly. For every minute that passes without a SCA victim receiving resuscitation, the chances of that person surviving decrease 10 percent. After 10 minutes the chances of survival are minimal.

Source: Business Wire

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Media Assets

PulsePoint App Visuals
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SpacerSanta Clara County/SF Bay Area Responders (Map View)

Farid Rashti (Survivor)
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Walter Huber (PulsePoint Responder)
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SpacerChildhood Photo Walter Huber grew up wanting to be in public service. This picture was taken while Huber was just at toddler, sitting in a Sunnyvale fire truck.

Deputy Chief Steve Drewniany, City of Sunnyvale Department of Public Safety (DPS)
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Richard Price, Founder/President, PulsePoint Foundation
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Dr. Chad Rammohan
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SpacerCPR/AED Audio Recorded from Sunnyvale Police Officer’s Dash Cam Belt Mic

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