RFD Medic 5 at Mercy

July 1, 2014 | by

Rogers Fire Department App Asks Residents To Do CPR, Save Lives

Rogers Fire StationA new smartphone application that asks volunteers to help when someone nearby has a cardiac arrest could make the difference between life and death for some residents, said Tom Jenkins, Rogers fire chief.

“Over the course of the year, I think we will save a few more lives,” Jenkins said Friday.

On Tuesday, city aldermen approved spending about $45,000 to participate in an app by PulsePoint, a nonprofit organization that aims to provide a nationwide system that matches volunteers to people who need cardio-pulmonary resuscitation. The app will go live in Rogers within three months, Jenkins said.

Starting CPR immediately increases the chance of survival among cardiac arrest patients, said Richard Price, PulsePoint president and a former fire chief.

“We know bystanders can intervene and make a difference in people’s lives before firefighters arrive,” Price said.

During a heart attack, brain damage can start in about five minutes, and the survival rate drops to almost zero in 10 minutes, Price said. In Rogers, it takes an average of about 6 1/2 minutes for dispatchers to get the 911 call, notify firefighters, and for firefighters to suit up and drive to the location where a heart attack is happening, Jenkins said.

The cardiac arrest survival rate in Rogers was about 42 percent last year, he said.

Implementing the app is the second step to getting residents to participate in emergency care, Jenkins said. The Fire Department has pushed for residents to learn CPR for about three years, he said.

The strategy has worked, Jenkins said. The Rogers Fire Department has trained about 15,000 residents in CPR, and bystander participation is up.

The Fire Department had about 100 bystanders help during emergencies last year when just two years ago that number was in the single digits, Jenkins said.

“Our community here in Rogers has really stepped up to learn CPR,” he said.

The PulsePoint Respond app is new, but participation is growing nationwide, Price said. The 3-year-old app is used in about 600 cities and communities nationwide and in 18 states. Another 200 cities are in the process of adding the app, he said.

Rogers will be the first to try the app in Arkansas, Price said. Jenkins said other cities may follow suit once they see how well the app works.

At A Glance

Bystander CPR

Effective bystander CPR provided immediately after sudden cardiac arrest can double or triple a victim’s chance of survival. In Rogers, the survival rate was 42 percent last year, compared to about 7 percent in 2010.

App Coverage

The PulsePoint Response app will cover Rogers and Little Flock and part of Benton County along Arkansas 12 and Arkansas 94 East. The app also acts as a registry for defibrillators and notifies volunteers where public defibrillators are located. For volunteers who register, the app also will relocate when they travel to other jurisdictions that use it. So, a Rogers traveler can be notified of a cardiac arrest while they are visiting Las Vegas, for example.

Survival Rate

Survival rates nationwide for sudden cardiac arrests are less than 8 percent. Only about a third of victims receive bystander CPR. Without oxygen-rich blood, permanent brain damage or death can occur in less than 8 minutes.

View the full story By Scarlet Simson at NWAonline.

Bryan Hinds

June 29, 2014 | by

New Smartphone App Could Reduce Heart Attack Deaths

Rogers, AR — A new smartphone app is coming to Rogers, and it has the potential to help save lives. “PulsePoint” is a free app that notifies CPR certified people of a cardiac emergency nearby. When a 911 call is placed, the closest person in a public location that is certified to perform CPR will be alerted on their phone so they can respond before emergency crews arrive. The City of Rogers has been working to reduce the number of cardiac arrest deaths in the area for several years. They also want to increase the number of bystanders performing CPR.

Bryan Hinds of Rogers’ Fire Department says, “we were wanting to up that [CPR responses] percentage because we think we can significantly impact the number of survivals from cardiac arrest.”

View the full story on the NWA Homepage.

Scott and Drew

June 24, 2014 | by

Medic shares his PulsePoint experience on KXL Morning News Radio

TVF&R Firefighter Scott Brawner saved a life while off-duty recently, and credits a new mobile app for the quick response. He shares his PulsePoint experience with Steve and Rebecca on KXL Morning News Radio.


 

PulsePoint AED Logo

June 21, 2014 | by

PulsePoint AED (v1.1) is available in the store today

PulsePoint AED v1.1Among several usability improvements you’ll also find:

  • Landmark icons (such as restaurants, gas stations, etc.) are now suppressed in the map display to provide greater visibility of AED icons
  • A new “spotlight” map mask to indicate the area searched for the currently displayed AEDs
  • AED photos now support rotation

Plus, so much more in the works…

PulsePoint AED on the App Store on iTunes

Filed Under: Bugs/Fixes/Workarounds, News | Tagged With: , ,
Healthline Logo

June 21, 2014 | by

PulsePoint Named a Top Heart Disease App of the Year

best-apps-badge-2014-heart-disease-375px Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) can be a life-saving tool if someone nearby goes into cardiac arrest. PulsePoint is a one-of-a-kind app that matches those in need with those who can help instantly.

Location-based services allow users who are trained in CPR provide assistance to someone experiencing a cardiac event. If you’re signed up as a provider, you’ll get an alert when someone in your area needs emergency CPR.

See the winners at Healthline.

Written by Erica Roth. Winners selected by Tracy Rosecrans. Medically Reviewed on May 19, 2014 by Kenneth R. Hirsch, MD

NationSwell Logo

June 18, 2014 | by

An App That Turns Everyday Bystanders Into Everyday Heroes

PulsePoint saves lives by improving the way we respond to those in distress.

Justin Sullivan/Getty ImagesWhen an airplane passenger is in physical distress, the flight attendant calls through the speakers asking if medical professionals are on board. It’s a simple action that can make a huge difference. What if we could mimic this same outreach, 10,000 feet below, everyday on the ground?

That’s exactly what the smart phone app PulsePoint (for download here) makes possible, according to Emergency Management. Using the gadgets we all carry every day, municipalities that use the free mobile service are able to send out alerts to CPR-certified citizens who are nearby someone in need. In many cases, there are just a few minutes between life and death, so every second counts. By quickening response times, this app can help save lives — before an ambulance is even in sight.

PulsePoint doesn’t replace dispatched responders, but as fast as ambulances and emergency medical technicians try to arrive, they’re often not quick enough. Once 9-1-1 is dialed and the available crew is actually with the patient, it can be too late – making those that can arrive quicker a vital resource.

San Jose became the first area city to use PulsePoint in 2012 — the app’s founder and CEO, Richard Price, is from the area, having worked as an ex-fire chief of the San Ramon Valley Fire Protection District. Since then, it’s caught on thanks to support from a local hospital and the results it provides. A local hospital is also planning a public registry of automated defibrillators through a new, related app, PulsePoint AED.

With decreasing local budgets for emergency response, increasing populations and traffic congestion, the demand for innovations like PulsePoint is greater than ever. By alerting off-duty first responders, medical professionals, and other CPR certified individuals of a nearby need, PulsePoint turns them into valuable lifesavers, all with the tap of a phone, making the app early — and effective — when time means everything.

View the full story by Harrison Potter at NationSwell.

Anderson County Dispatcher

June 14, 2014 | by

Smartphone app aims to save lives in Anderson County

ANDERSON, SC (FOX Carolina) – The Anderson County Sheriff’s Office is using a new high-tech tool that aims to turn ordinary bystanders into life-saving heroes.

Dispatchers in the county will now start pushing information to a new smartphone app called PulsePoint, which is an app that alerts CPR-trained bystanders about a nearby emergency where they may be able to help.

FOX Carolina

“You know the difference early CPR and defibrillation can make in a sudden cardiac arrest event. Fifty-seven percent of U.S. adults say they’ve had CPR training, and most would be willing to use CPR or an AED to help save a stranger’s life. Yet only 11 percent say they’ve used CPR in an actual emergency. That’s a number we can increase together,” PulsePoint says on its website.

The company also makes an app to help people locate automated external defibrillators (AEDs) nearby during cardiac emergencies.

It allows users to report the locations of AEDs whenever they see them, and that information is then shared with emergency dispatchers, who can share their location with people trained in CPR and off-duty firefighters, nurses and other professionals.

View the full story by Joseph Pereira at FOX Carolina.

SJ Mercury News Logo

June 12, 2014 | by

PulsePoint app turns bystanders into first responders

When it comes to helping a victim of cardiac arrest, it’s all about speed. PulsePoint, a life-saving mobile app, may not necessarily increase the speed at which first responders arrive, but it adds more legs to the race.

Santa Clara County agencies began using the PulsePoint app earlier this year with the goal of mobilizing CPR-trained residents and bystanders into becoming first responders.

The free app uses location-based technology to alert CPR-trained citizens if someone in their immediate area is experiencing sudden cardiac arrest. The alerted citizen can then choose to spring into action, find the victim and begin resuscitation until official emergency responders arrive.

“I can do an important job that the fire department can not do,” says PulsePoint Foundation president and app inventor Richard Price, adding that first responders “can’t get there in two minutes. I can sustain life until they arrive.”

Price, the former chief of the San Ramon Valley Fire Protection District, conceived the idea in 2009 after there was a cardiac arrest incident near him that he was unaware of and could not respond to. The idea came just as the smart phone revolution was gaining serious momentum.

“This idea to push a message to a phone is fairly new, and the ability for the phone to know where it’s at is still fairly new,” Price says.

Price adds that there are associated time costs that people forget about between the initial 911 call and paramedics arriving to assist. Call dispatchers have to take information, firefighters and paramedics need to scramble to their vehicles, and responders still need to get to the precise location of the victim.

All of this needs to happen in nine minutes, after which Price says there is a 92 percent chance of death.

“In these first few minutes, you can really make a difference,” Price says. “You just think about these minutes as a [baseball] score, and you don’t want to start in a deep hole. You don’t win many games when it’s 9-0 in the first inning.”

While the app is available to all CPR-trained individuals, the real target audience is off-duty firefighters, nurses and other life-saving professionals. However, Price adds that all CPR-trained individuals are valuable, and simply being aware of the app can stimulate awareness of CPR and trigger more discussion, especially for younger more tech-savvy residents.

View the full story by Matt Wilson at San Jose Mercury News.

Scott Brawner Alert

June 6, 2014 | by

A CPR App Is Saving Lives One Text at a Time

Calling 9-1-1 triggers a life-saving chain of events from a free smartphone app.

In May of this year, cardiac arrest struck Drew Basse, a 57-year-old truck driver in Clackamas, Ore., too suddenly for him to even call for help.

“I remember sitting down in my car and the dome light being on — then I was completely knocked out,” Basse said. He didn’t even have time to call 9-1-1. But a passing security guard did, starting a life-saving chain of events involving a free smartphone app called PulsePoint.

The security guard’s 9-1-1 call automatically sent a message to PulsePoint, and a text message alert went out from the app saying that someone needed CPR.

Scott Brawner, an off-duty firefighter from Tualatin Valley Fire & Rescue in Canby, Ore., happened to be on a treadmill at a nearby 24-hour fitness center when he got the app alert on his iPhone, telling him where someone was in need of CPR.

Brawner was surprised when the app kicked in, he said. “I was listening to Pandora — it turned off the radio, made a tone, and showed a map and AED location,” he said. “I had never seen the place before and I ran right to it.” On the way, Brawner could see where he was going on his iPhone map.

Full Story

He found Basse alone in his car sitting bolt upright. The security guard was there and shaken up, said Brawner, and he didn’t know CPR.

“I wasn’t even breathing when Scott Brawner found me,” said Basse.

“I pulled Drew out of the driver’s seat, laid him on the ground, and started CPR. I did a few hundred cycles of hands-only CPR — 100 beats per minute, compressions only. Then the ambulance and fire department came and I moved aside. It’s a little bit of a blur,” said Brawner.

The firefighter found out about the PulsePoint smartphone CPR alert system at the fire department he worked about a year ago. “During the roll-out I thought it would be great to put on my phone, and my wife downloaded it too. She’s also trained in CPR,” Brawner said. “I’ve been a paramedic for 34 years and have never seen anything like it,” he said about the app, which works on both iOS and Android devices.

While the American Heart Association reports that 9 out of 10 of the 359,400 people who went into cardiac arrest outside of a hospital in 2013 died, Basse’s case turned out differently.

View the full story by Jennifer J. Brown at Everyday Health.

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Drew in Wheelchair

June 4, 2014 | by

Heart Attack Rescue? There’s an App for That

A new smartphone app that aims to turn ordinary bystanders into heart attack heroes did just that last month, saving the life of a 57-year-old truck driver from Portland, Oregon, who had collapsed outside a gym.

Drew Basse is the first high-profile rescue attributed to PulsePoint, a free mobile app that alerts users when someone is in cardiac arrest nearby.

“Without people like Scott Brawner, I wouldn’t have had a second chance,” said Basse, referring to the off-duty local firefighter who answered the PulsePoint ping.

Basse, a father of two and grandfather to four, is recovering in a Portland rehabilitation center after the May 9 incident that Brawner said was the highlight of his 34-year career.

“I can’t believe that it worked,” said Brawner, 52, of Tualatin, Oregon. “It was just awesome. It still gives me chills.”

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Created on a shoestring budget by Richard Price, a former San Ramon, California, fire chief who didn’t want to miss an emergency call, PulsePoint has gained slow traction since 2009, rolling out to 911 dispatch centers that now cover some 600 U.S. cities.

“We’ve found that people are very willing to put their hand up and say, ‘I’ll help,’” said Price. More than 140,000 people have signed up for PulsePoint so far and more than 7,300 have responded to nearly 2,300 alerts.

Every year in the U.S. there are about 360,000 out-of-hospital cardiac arrests, or about 1,000 a day. Experts who research the problem say PulsePoint may be one way to boost the ranks of those who can perform bystander CPR, which doubles or triples the chances of surviving.

“It’s a great use of technology to enlist the aid of people who are willing and able to help save lives from cardiac arrest,” said Dr. Michael Sayre, an emergency medicine doctor with the University of Washington in Seattle and an leader in resuscitation medicine.

In Basse’s case, he was saved by Brawner, who happened to be working out at the same gym. Brawner’s fire district signed up for PulsePoint about a year ago.

But even he wasn’t expecting the alert that showed up on his phone as he walked on the treadmill, telling him that someone needed CPR, or cardiopulmonary resuscitation, right away. He saw a map, an icon of where he was, an icon showing the closet AED or automated external defibrillator — and an icon showing a victim. He quickly ran down two flights of stairs.

“I saw a security guard standing in the parking structure and it just didn’t look right to me,” Brawner said. “That’s where Drew Basse was. He was literally sitting in his car, unconscious, not breathing, no pulse.”

In fact, Brawner thought he looked like a “fresh code,” firefighter slang for someone who is already dead.

Brawner pulled Basse out of his car and started performing CPR. Within minutes, emergency crews arrived and took over, but the time that Brawner kept Basse’s blood pumping was crucial, doctors said.

That’s just what PulsePoint founder Price, 52, had in mind. He was a veteran of 32 years as a firefighter and fire chief, focused on improving bystander CPR and rapid response.

He was at lunch one day when he heard sirens and saw a fire truck pull right up to the business next door. “I wasn’t even aware of it,” he said. “I was actually in uniform. I had an AED in my car. We just weren’t plugged into those types of calls.”

Using technical skill gleaned from years of operating dispatch centers, Price worked with engineering interns from Northern Kentucky University to develop the app. Now, it’s updated and maintained by the firm Workday, which provides technical services for free.

View the full story by JoNel Aleccia at NBC News.

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