Downtown Long Beach, California

October 3, 2014 | by

Long Beach Fire Department Announces Adoption of PulsePoint App

Invites Residents to Citywide Preparedness Expo on October 4, 2014

LONG BEACH, Calif., October 3, 2014 – To aid cardiac arrest victims quickly, the Long Beach Fire Department, the PulsePoint Foundation and Dignity Health St. Mary Medical Center, Long Beach are making the PulsePoint app available to individuals in the City of Long Beach today. Aimed at average citizens and off-duty professionals trained in CPR, the app alerts registered users when a sudden cardiac arrest occurs in a public place in their immediate vicinity. Informed at the same time as emergency responders, users are given detailed instructions, including the location of automatic external defibrillators (AEDs) nearby.

More than 22,000 people in Los Angeles County have already downloaded the app. A widespread promotional campaign that starts on October 4 with the READY Long Beach Community Preparedness Expo at Heartwell Park will help raise awareness among the 461,000 residents of Long Beach.

“The PulsePoint App will be a vital asset to our City because it creates more first responders to augment our emergency medical personnel,” Mayor Robert Garcia said. “If you’re CPR-trained, please download the PulsePoint app now to help save a life.”

The City Council last month expressed support of the PulsePoint app and requested that the City prepare an outreach strategy to help inform the community of this new technology, based on a request brought forth by Councilmembers Stacy Mungo and Suzie Price.

The leading cause of death in the U.S., cardiac arrests outside hospitals are responsible for more than 1,000 deaths a day and 424,000 a year. Effective CPR administered immediately after a cardiac arrest can potentially double or triple the victim’s chance of survival, but less than half of victims receive that immediate help.

“The PulsePoint app enables citizens that are trained in CPR to take lifesaving action that will make a difference in our community and increase the chance of survivability during a sudden cardiac arrest,” said Long Beach Fire Chief Michael DuRee. “PulsePoint will save lives. In partnership with Dignity Health St. Mary Medical Center, Long Beach, we are committed to introducing technology that can help us build a safer, more resilient community.”

“As a health care organization committed to the health of individuals and the community, Dignity Health St. Mary Medical Center is proud to partner with the City of Long Beach and the Long Beach Fire Department to get the word out about PulsePoint,” said St. Mary Medical Center President/CEO Thomas A. Salerno. “PulsePoint has been proven to save lives, so this is right in line with our organizational mission.”

“The PulsePoint App is an important tool that the public can use to help their neighbors in time of need,” Councilmember Mungo said. “I especially encourage people to attend the Citywide “READY Long Beach” Community Preparedness Expo on Saturday, October 4, to learn how to prepare for earthquakes, fires, floods and other disasters.”

The free event, open to the public, will be from 10 am to 5 pm at Heartwell Park, near the corner of Clark and Carson streets.

In addition to the PulsePoint app, the Long Beach Fire Department will be using the PulsePoint AED app to help locate and record all public access defibrillators in the City for use during cardiac arrest emergencies. Once validated, these crowdsourced AED will be visible in the PulsePoint app as well as for dispatcher use during emergency calls. The PulsePoint apps are available for iPhone and Android and can be downloaded from the iTunes Store™ and Google Play™.

About the Long Beach Fire Department
Founded in 1897, the Long Beach Fire Department is rich with tradition and provides the highest level of service to the City of Long Beach. Each day, 110 emergency responders are on duty to provide fire protection, life safety and environmental protection services to more than 461,000 residents and commercial businesses in Long Beach’s 52.3-square-mile area. When called into action following major disasters throughout the State of California, the Department’s Urban Search and Rescue Team responds as members of California Regional Task Force 3. Once back in Long Beach, these same elite responders can be found at work providing these same services to our community. The Department proudly continues to be a frontrunner in firefighting technology, offering specialized training opportunities in Urban Search and Rescue, Emergency Medical Services, Hazardous Materials, Disaster Management, and Homeland Security. Behind the scenes, more than 70 dedicated business professionals help carry out the mission. Learn more at www.longbeach.gov/fire.

About the PulsePoint Foundation
PulsePoint is a 501(c)(3) non-profit foundation based in the San Francisco Bay Area. Through the use of modern, location-aware mobile devices PulsePoint is building applications that work with local public safety agencies to improve communications with citizens and empower them to help reduce the millions of annual deaths from sudden cardiac arrest. Deployment of the PulsePoint app can significantly strengthen the “chain of survival” by improving bystander response to cardiac arrest victims in public settings and increasing the chance that lifesaving steps will be taken prior to the arrival of emergency medical services (EMS). PulsePoint is built and maintained by volunteer engineers at Workday, a leading provider of enterprise cloud applications and distributed by Physio-Control of Redmond, WA. Learn more at www.pulsepoint.org or join the conversation at Facebook and Twitter.

About Dignity Health St. Mary Medical Center, Long Beach
Dignity Health St. Mary Medical Center is a 389-bed acute care nonprofit hospital that offers a full range of inpatient, outpatient and related health and wellness services to the greater Long Beach area. With more than 600 physicians and 1,350 employees, St. Mary is committed to providing a unique balance of high-quality, compassionate care, personal attention and leading-edge medical technology that brings both healing and humanity to the body, mind and spirit of our patients and the communities we serve. St. Mary was founded by the Sisters of Charity of the Incarnate Word in 1923, and is mission-driven not only to deliver care to the sick, but also to provide direct services to the poor and underserved and advocate on their behalf. For more information, please visit us at www.stmarymedicalcenter.org.

Media Contact
Jake Heflin, Firefighter/Paramedic/PIO
562.570.2598 (Office)
562.760.6950 (Mobile)
Jacob.Heflin@longbeach.gov

San Diego Featured

September 6, 2014 | by

Where is there PulsePoint coverage?

Currently the easiest way to view a list of PulsePoint-connected agencies is to check within the app.

Android Devices
Tap the Settings Tab and browse the list of agencies.

Apple Devices
Tap the menu icon in the upper left corner and select Agencies from the menu. You can browse the list of agencies or search by agency name, city, or zip code. You can also tap the locate current location icon (right side of the search box) to check for coverage based on your present location (i.e. is there coverage where I am right now).

Agencies Screen Spacer Agencies Search

 
Coverage Map
We are working on a dynamic map view that will automatically update as new communities come online. We hope to have such a coverage map available on our website soon. Also feel free to send us a question about any specific city/county. If you find that PulsePoint isn’t available yet in your city, and would like to speed up the process, please read how do I help bring PulsePoint to my community.

Filed Under: News | Tagged With: , , ,
App Icons

September 6, 2014 | by

How do I help bring PulsePoint to my community?

PulsePoint is typically marketed to Fire and EMS agencies. If you are with a public safety agency we are well equipped to lead you through the process. We have partnered with Physio-Control to discuss and implement PulsePoint throughout the United States and around the world. You can reach out to your local rep or give Physio-Control a call at (800) 442-1142. You can also send them an inquiry at pulsepoint@physio-control.com.

With the amount national attention PulsePoint has received recently we are fielding many inquiries from individuals interested in having PulsePoint provided in their community. While it is the mission of our foundation to provide seamless PulsePoint coverage across the globe, this will obviously take time. PulsePoint must be integrated into the local emergency call center so that we can be aware of cardiac arrests in real time.

Although we are working hard to make public safety agencies aware of PulsePoint, you can definitely help by expressing interest to your local fire chief, EMS official, and elected officials such as your mayor and council members. A simple note, phone call or public meeting comment would ensure that they are aware of PulsePoint. Expressing your personal willingness to participate in improving local cardiac arrest survival rates through CPR and AED use would likely be well received and go a long way to help move things up in priority. We have found that City Hall does listen and is quite willing to bring PulsePoint to the community. Here is a brochure you can share with them.

We are adding PulsePoint-connected communities on an almost daily basis and look forward to adding your community in the very near future.

Chris Ernst

September 5, 2014 | by

El Camino Hospitals’ Chris Ernst To Join PulsePoint Board

PLEASANTON, CA, September 5, 2014 – The PulsePoint Foundation today announced that Chris Ernst, Vice President, Marketing and Corporate Communications at El Camino Hospital, has been appointed to its board, effective August 28, 2014.

“Having championed the initial expansion of PulsePoint into San Jose, Chris has been actively involved with our foundation almost from its inception,” said Board Chairman Matthew Stamey. “Her health care experience and insight is highly valued by our board.”

In 2012, El Camino Hospital provided funding for the foundation to begin assisting local fire departments and emergency response systems. Chris Ernst and El Camino Hospital were an integral part of the team credited for bringing PulsePoint’s life-saving mobile phone apps to Santa Clara County. El Camino Hospital is committed to investing in technology and services that improve the health and well being of the community.

Ernst has more than 25 years of health care marketing and communications experience, including marketing, branding, and corporate media communications, issues/crisis management for both start-ups and mature organizations. During her tenure at El Camino Hospital, Chris has led the implementation of social and mobile marketing strategies, including the Family Medical Officer (FMO) app and the PulsePoint app to Silicon Valley. Ms. Ernst holds a bachelor’s degree in communications from California State University, Chico.

Amy Schatz,

August 24, 2014 | by

Life Saving Crowdsourcing App Expands Reach To Stop Cardiac Arrests

Recode LogoOff-duty firefighter Scott Brawner was working out in a suburban Portland gym this spring, listening to Pandora, when suddenly the music stopped.

An app on his phone warned him that someone nearby needed CPR. Brawner reportedly raced around the gym, trying to find the victim before heading to the parking lot, where he saw a man sprawled on the pavement. He began giving the man CPR until fire and rescue units showed up.

The man’s survival wasn’t just a blessing for his family, it was a huge victory for the PulsePoint Foundation, a Bay Area non-profit whose app is making it easier to alert CPR-trained people that someone nearby needs help.

Crowdsourcing has been used for everything from political campaigns to potato salad, but PulsePoint’s app represents the first time it has been used on a wide-scale to help save dying people in cardiac arrest. Victims have very little time – generally ten minutes or under – to receive CPR before they either lose brain functions or die.

PulsePoint’s free app connects to local 911 call centers and alerts users when there is someone nearby in need of CPR. PulsePoint users get an alert the same time as local emergency responders.

It also shows the location of the closest automatic defibrillator (if there is one nearby) as well as a reminder about how to do CPR, just in case the user has an adrenaline-induced brain-freeze. A related PulsePoint app is trying to get people to crowdsource the locations of automatic defibrillators so volunteers will know where to find them.

“As a fire chief I was always focused on response times. Trying to get help to people faster,” said Richard Price, a former San Ramon Valley Fire Department chief, who is the force behind the app and the non-profit foundation that oversees it. Crowdsourcing volunteer CPR-trained volunteers “is a very efficient, low-cost way of making an impact.”

Price came up with the idea for the app five years ago after a disturbing incident one day while eating a sandwich.

He was at a local deli when he heard sirens, Price remembers. Emergency vehicles pulled up and he rushed outside to see what was going on. A man in a shop next door had collapsed and emergency responders were unable to revive him.

“He was on the other side of the wall, I couldn’t see him,” Price says. “He lay there unconscious with no one doing CPR. I had a (automated defibrillator) nearby in my vehicle.”

Although the iPhone had been introduced a few years before, apps that took advantage of location-based information were only starting to be developed.

“It just struck me that we could have off-duty professionals – police, firefighters, nurses and all the CPR trained citizens – who had to be in the exact right place at the right time,” he said. “We have these phones now. Could we use someone’s phone to determine their locations…give them the same capabilities as first responders?”

Price’s fire department had little money to spend on the project. He says he talked to developers around the Bay Area but couldn’t find anyone who would help them for the right price. He eventually connected with a computer science program at Northern Kentucky University, which required students to develop a working app as a graduation requirement.

A group of students created a working prototype “at almost no cost,” Price says. They tested the app in the San Ramon area and eventually found support from PeopleSoft co-founder David Duffield, whose enterprise cloud applications company WorkDay, volunteered to take over. The company still volunteers engineering time to develop and maintain the technology.

The PulsePoint Foundation was created in 2011, which holds all of the intellectual property for the app, as well as funding from WorkDay and other groups to help expand the app’s reach. The foundation also partnered with Physio-Control, a medical device developer specializing in automated defibrillators, to market the app technology.

Los Angeles County began using the system earlier this month, joining about 700 local communities in 20 states which have connected the technology to their 911 call centers. Another 200 communities are in the process of adding the service, Price says, which generally costs about $5,000 a year.

View the full story by Amy Schatz at Re/code.

Collier County NBC

August 23, 2014 | by

Collier County Sheriff’s Office looks to integrate CPR app with 911 system

COLLIER COUNTY, FL – Thanks to a communication technology upgrade at the sheriff’s office, Collier County residents can soon find out where victims are in need of CPR almost as soon as someone calls 911.

The city plans to integrate a mobile app called Pulse Point into its computer-aided dispatch system as part of a technology upgrade.

NBC-2.com WBBH News for Fort Myers, Cape Coral

“The app typically displays all emergency activity in the jurisdiction, but alerts CPR-trained citizen and off-duty professional to nearby cardiac arrest [where CPR and AEDs are needed],” said president of the Pulse Point Foundation Richard Price.

The Collier County Sheriff’s Office says they are still working out pricing with the company; along with if the call taker or dispatcher will send the information to the app. Pulse Point is only activated for emergencies in public places. It could save lives.

“The leading cause of death in adults in the United States, there are about 1.2 million heart attacks each year,” said chief of Collier County Emergency Medical Services Walter Kopka,

Kopka says heart attacks lead to more deaths than car crashes. He claims having someone there to jumpstart CPR could be a huge help.

Full Story

“If all they do is push on their chest until professional rescuers arrive they’ll be pushing oxygen up to the brain. And that’s exactly what we want done, prior to our arrival. Keeping the brain alive,” said Kopka.

The Collier County Sheriff’s Office is working out the details to sync it up with its 911 system.

A PSA from the company show’s how it works: http://vimeo.com/77306721

All people would need to do is download the app and sign up to get alerts in their area. Then alerts will show up on their screen.

Other cities like Orlando are already using Pulse Point.

View the full story by Sophie Nielsen-Kolding at NBC-2 Florida.

Less Story
WKYC (NBC)

August 20, 2014 | by

Court bailiff saves a life with CPR

CLEVELAND — Donald Austin of Cleveland owes his life to strangers. Strangers who had a basic skill that was needed at a critical time. On July 29th, Austin took a friend to traffic court. While waiting on his friend, Austin collapsed from a massive heart attack.

Deputy Bailiff Stephen Gaines was just feet away when it happened and jumped into action.

Trouble viewing video?

“It surprised me that the training I had just snapped back into me with CPR,” Gaines says. The officer adds he had help from several colleagues including a Cleveland Police officer who assisted with the CPR, several other court officers and Sheriff’s Deputies. All who’ve had CPR training.

Meanwhile, Cleveland EMS and MetroHealth, where Austin was taken, say that the PulsePoint app was also activated. PulsePoint is a free app that you can download onto your phone and it will alert you if someone is having a heart attack nearby. It will also give you the closest AED location. No one knows who’s app was activated, but there was someone else willing to help Austin.

Austin can’t thank the officers enough.

“I have a second chance with my family and people that love me, I would like to thank them from the bottom of my heart for acting as fast as they did because they saved my life,” he says.

View the full story by Monica Robins at WKYC (NBC).

Steve Lopez, LA Times

August 10, 2014 | by

App could boost chances of cardiac arrest victims

Later this month I’ll be marking the two-year anniversary of my death.

That’s not a line you see too often, is it?

My heart gave out after knee surgery, because of an arrhythmia. Even for those who suffer cardiac arrest in a hospital, the survival rate is low. But I was lucky. A nurse quickly used CPR and brought me back from the dead in less than a minute.

CPR-needed Alert MapLast week while driving to work I heard my cardiologist, Dr. Leslie Saxon, on KNX-AM (1070) talking about a new app that could save the lives of those stricken by cardiac arrest. The Los Angeles County Fire Department is encouraging civilians to download the app and join a growing army of crowd-sourced good Samaritans — 13,000 so far — who can keep someone alive until emergency crews arrive.

Before I tell you how the app works and how simple it is to use, let me tell you why it’s so important.

Cardiac arrest is a leading cause of death, killing more than 1,000 people a day in the United States. The victims, who include children, often have no symptoms and consider themselves perfectly healthy. As opposed to a heart attack (a plumbing problem in which blood flow to the heart is blocked), cardiac arrest is the sudden loss of heart function caused by an electrical malfunction in which the heart’s pumping action is disrupted.

Without CPR — and I mean chest compressions, not mouth-to-mouth resuscitation — death can occur within minutes. That means a five-minute response to a 911 call might be too late.

“It’s going to take a community to impact the dismal survival rates for out-of-hospital cardiac arrest patients,” Saxon said.

The idea for the app was hatched several years ago by a Bay Area fire chief who thought there must be a way to put the 13 million people with CPR training to better use. So, what if the moment someone dialed 911 in a case of cardiac arrest, nearby civilians could be notified on their mobile phones and do CPR until paramedics arrive?

Richard Price, now retired from the San Ramon Valley Fire Department, helped establish a nonprofit that has now linked its PulsePoint app to emergency systems in about 200 California fire departments and several hundred more around the country. He said the Los Angeles Fire Department may be signing on soon.

“There have been some pretty significant stories of lives saved, directly attributable to the app,” Price said.

Most interventions, so far, have been by off-duty emergency responders who downloaded the app. But as Price points out, any civilian can learn CPR in a matter of minutes. The PulsePoint app itself has a “how-to” feature with a diagram on how to place the heels of the hands in the center of the chest and push down firmly and rapidly, about 100 times per minute.

If you have the app and you’re in the L.A. County Fire Department coverage area, you’ll get a beep on your iPhone or Android device if you’re within one-quarter mile of where the fallen person is. Although it might be best in some cases to simply do CPR until trained responders arrive, a related app will give you a map showing where the nearest portable Automated External Defibrillator, or AED, is located.

Even if you’re not comfortable using one, you might be able to alert someone who is. Not all cases of cardiac arrest call for an AED, but the machines are designed for quick diagnosis, with clear and simple instructions on safe use by lay persons.

Price said it will take some time for the location of all AEDs to be loaded into the app. And it’s going to take some time, as well, for AEDs to become more prevalent. Concerns about cost ($1,200 or more per unit) and legal liability have impeded wider use.

Full Story

Bob Roy, a Riverside man whose 14-year-old son, Travis, went into cardiac arrest at his middle school in 2005 and later died, has been lobbying to require schools to have AEDs.

“You’re a hundred times more likely to need an AED than a fire extinguisher, and which of those two are required by law?” asked Roy, who has helped place dozens of the devices in schools through the nonprofit thetravisfund.org.

Former state Sen. Joe Simitian, now a Santa Clara County supervisor, said resistance to AEDs is based in part on fears of legal liability if the devices malfunction. But the technology has improved dramatically since regulations were written, he said, and it may be time to legislatively broaden legal protection for those willing to try to save someone’s life.

More people die each year from cardiac arrest than from lung, breast, prostate and colon cancer combined. And Dr. Frank Pratt, medical director for the L.A. County Fire Department, says it’s time for cardiac arrest to be addressed with the same urgency.

“If this number of people were dying from an infection or a defect in an automobile or a stove, there’d be a national uproar,” Pratt said. “The PulsePoint app gives us an opportunity to reinvigorate the dialogue on the whole public health problem of sudden cardiac arrest.”

Less Story