Research

Reports and Research

CARES Logo.

Title
PulsePoint Report Utilizing CARES 2018 & 2019 Data

Author
Cardiac Arrest Registry to Enhance Survival (C.A.R.E.S)
Woodruff Health Sciences Center
Atlanta, Georgia

Findings
An analysis of PulsePoint agencies who were also CARES participants for all of 2018 and 2019 showed that PulsePoint communities performed better in all indicated CARES performance measures.

Wiley Logo.

Title
Mobile Smartphone Technology Is Associated With Out‐of‐hospital Cardiac Arrest Survival Improvement

Authors
Clement Derkenne, MD, Daniel Jost, MD, Florian Roquet, MD, Paul Dardel, MD, Romain Kedzierewicz, MD, Alexandre Mignon, MD, PhD, Stephane Travers, MD, PhD, Benoit Frattini, MD, Laurent Prieux, MD, Emmanuel Rozenberg, MD, Xavier Demaison, MD, John Gaudet, MD, PhD, Felicite de Charry, MD, Olivier Stibbe, MD, Frederique Briche, MD, Frederic Lemoine, Xavier Lesaffre, Olga Maurin, Eric Gauyat, Eric Faraon, Sabine Lemoine, and Bertrand Prunet, MD, PhD and the Bon Samaritain Task Force, Paris Fire Brigade Cardiac Arrest Task Force (May 23, 2020)

Findings
After adjustment for confounders, survival at hospital discharge was significantly improved for patients in the intervention group (35% vs. 16%, adjusted odds ratio = 5.9, 95% confidence interval = 2.1 to 16.5, p < 0.001). All CPR metrics were improved in the intervention group.

New England Journal of Medicine logo.

Title
Mobile-Phone Dispatch of Laypersons for CPR in Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest

Authors
Mattias Ringh, M.D., Mårten Rosenqvist, M.D., Ph.D., Jacob Hollenberg, M.D., Ph.D., Martin Jonsson, B.Sc., David Fredman, R.N., Per Nordberg, M.D., Hans Järnbert-Pettersson, Ph.D., Ingela Hasselqvist-Ax, R.N., Gabriel Riva, M.D., and Leif Svensson, M.D., Ph.D. (June 11, 2015)

Findings
A mobile-phone positioning system to dispatch lay volunteers who were trained in CPR was associated with significantly increased rates of bystander-initiated CPR among persons with out-of-hospital cardiac arrest.

Integration of mobile-phone positioning systems with AED registries may facilitate lay responders in locating the nearest AED and thereby increase efficacy in public-access defibrillation programs.

Almost 10,000 people voluntarily joined the program without any financial compensation, and no major adverse events were reported.

Resuscitation Journal Logo.

Title
Lay persons alerted by mobile application system initiate earlier cardio-pulmonary resuscitation: a comparison with SMS- based system notification

Authors
Caputo Maria Luce, Muschietti Sandro, Burkart Roman, Benvenuti Claudio, Conte Giulio, Regoli François, Mauri Romano, Klersy Catherine, Moccetti Tiziano, Auricchio Angel (March 4, 2017)

Findings
The mobile app system is highly efficient in the recruitment of first responders, significantly reducing the time to the initiation of CPR thus increasing survival rates.

Resuscitation Journal Logo.

Title
Real-life time and distance covered by lay first responders alerted by means of smartphone-application: Implications for early initiation of cardiopulmonary resuscitation and access to automatic external defibrillators

Authors
Angelo Auricchio, Lorenzo Gianquintieri, Roman Burkart, Claudio Benvenuti, Sandro Muschietti, Stefano Peluso, Antonietta Mira, Tiziano Moccetti, Maria Luce Caputo (May 19, 2019)

Findings
The dispatch of lay first responders directly to the OHCA site instead of first retrieving the AED, significantly decreases the time to CPR initiation.

Resuscitation Journal Logo.

Title
A text message alert system for trained volunteers improves out-of-hospital cardiac arrest survival

Authors
Ruud W.M. Pijls, Patty J. Nelemans, Braim M. Rahel, Anton P.M. Gorgels (June 8, 2016)

Findings
The text message alert system is effective in increasing survival to hospital discharge in OHCA victims and the degree of disability or dependence after survival is low.

Circulation logo.

Title
Use of Mobile Devices, Social Media, and Crowdsourcing as Digital Strategies to Improve Emergency Cardiovascular Care

Authors
John S. Rumsfeld, Steven C. Brooks, Tom P. Aufderheide, Marion Leary, Steven M. Bradley, Chileshe Nkonde-Price, Lee H. Schwamm, Mariell Jessup, Jose Maria E. Ferrer, Raina M. Merchant (August 23, 2016)

Findings
Digital strategies represent novel interventions to potentially improve care delivery and patient outcomes for emergency cardiovascular conditions.

New England Journal of Medicine logo.

Title
Early Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation in Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest

Authors
Ingela Hasselqvist-Ax, R.N., Gabriel Riva, M.D., Johan Herlitz, M.D., Ph.D., Mårten Rosenqvist, M.D., Ph.D., Jacob Hollenberg, M.D., Ph.D., Per Nordberg, M.D., Ph.D., Mattias Ringh, M.D., Ph.D., Martin Jonsson, B.Sc., Christer Axelsson, R.N., Ph.D., Jonny Lindqvist, M.Sc., Thomas Karlsson, B.Sc., and Leif Svensson, M.D., Ph.D. (June 11, 2015)

Findings
CPR performed before EMS arrival was associated with a 30-day survival rate after an out-of-hospital cardiac arrest that was more than twice as high as that associated with no CPR before EMS arrival.

New England Journal of Medicine logo.

Title
Lay Responder Care for an Adult with Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest

Authors
William J. Brady, M.D., Amal Mattu, M.D., and Corey M. Slovis, M.D. (December 5, 2019)

Findings
While instructions are being relayed by telephone, the dispatcher can alert others in the community about the cardiac arrest through text messaging and other smartphone-based applications. This approach notifies lay responders who have voluntarily agreed to join these digital response efforts of an occurrence of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest in their immediate vicinity, provides information about the arrest and location, and, in some cases, alerts them to the presence of adjacent public-access AEDs. Although this is a new strategy, early investigations are promising; studies have shown increased frequency of early CPR and associated improved survival and functional status among survivors. This strategy is formally supported by the AHA.

New England Journal of Medicine logo.

Title
Bystander Efforts and 1-Year Outcomes in Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest

Authors
Kristian Kragholm, M.D., Ph.D., Mads Wissenberg, M.D., Ph.D., Rikke N. Mortensen, M.Sc., Steen M. Hansen, M.D., Carolina Malta Hansen, M.D., Ph.D., Kristinn Thorsteinsson, M.D., Ph.D., Shahzleen Rajan, M.D., Freddy Lippert, M.D., Fredrik Folke, M.D., Ph.D., Gunnar Gislason, M.D., Ph.D., Lars Køber, M.D., D.Sc., Kirsten Fonager, M.D., Ph.D., et al. (May 4, 2017)

Findings
Bystander CPR and defibrillation were associated with risks of brain damage or nursing home admission and of death from any cause that were significantly lower than those associated with no bystander resuscitation.

NAM logo.

Title
Strategies to Improve Cardiac Arrest Survival: A Time to Act

Authors
Robert Graham, Chair, Mickey Eisenberg, Vice Chair (June 30, 2015)

Findings
The immediate, hands-on response of bystanders to cardiac arrest is critical to improve rates of effective resuscitation and, thereby, increase the likelihood of survival and positive neurologic outcomes for out-of-hospital cardiac arrest.

Bystander CPR makes the next link in the chain of survival, early defibrillation, more effective by increasing the proportion of individuals who are found with a shockable rhythm.

Many national and international registry studies indicate that bystander CPR can increase survival rates for OHCA between 50 and 500 percent.

Theoretically, a member of the public could be sued for providing bystander CPR; however, the committee is unaware of any successful suit of this type.

Use of PulsePoint is discussed on Pg. 160-161.